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The five organizations are the WTO, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Animal Health Organization (Office International des Epizooties or OIE), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank. (...) The OIE handles animal health. The FAO and WHO jointly provide the secretariat of Codex Alimentarius, which deals with food safety. The International Plant Protection Convention, which deals with plant health, whose secretariat is provided by the FAO.
Language:English
Score: 740921 - https://www.wto.org/english/news_e/pres01_e/pr254_e.htm
Data Source: un
South-East Asia Nepal Home Health topics Our work News Emergencies About us About WHO in Nepal Home / About us World Health Organization in Nepal The World Health Organization (WHO) The World Health Organization (WHO) was established on 7 April 1948 as the directing and coordinating authority in global public health within the United Nations system. (...) According to its constitution, the main goal of WHO is the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all people. The South-East Asia Region Home to a quarter of the world population, WHO SEARO provides leadership on health matters, articulates evidence-based policy options, provides technical support to countries and monitors health trends. (...) The strategy draws on the mandate, expertise, and comparative advantage of the WHO as the world’s leading public health organization.
Language:English
Score: 740320.95 - https://www.who.int/nepal/footer/help
Data Source: un
South-East Asia Nepal Home Health topics Our work News Emergencies About us About WHO in Nepal Home / About us World Health Organization in Nepal The World Health Organization (WHO) The World Health Organization (WHO) was established on 7 April 1948 as the directing and coordinating authority in global public health within the United Nations system. (...) According to its constitution, the main goal of WHO is the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all people. The South-East Asia Region Home to a quarter of the world population, WHO SEARO provides leadership on health matters, articulates evidence-based policy options, provides technical support to countries and monitors health trends. (...) The strategy draws on the mandate, expertise, and comparative advantage of the WHO as the world’s leading public health organization.
Language:English
Score: 740320.95 - https://www.who.int/nepal/about-us
Data Source: un
Suppose an intervention targets health outcomes of children through info on hand-washing. (...) • If control group is different from the counterfactual, our results can be biased • Can occur due to • Spillovers • Crossovers Constraints: logistics • Need to recognize logistical constraints in research designs. • E.g. individual de-worming treatment by health workers – Many responsibilities. Not just de-worming. – Serve members from both T/C groups – Different procedures for different groups? (...) Rotation design • Groups get treatment in turns • Advantages? • Concerns? Rotation design Round 2 Treatment from Round 1  Control —————————————————————————— Control from Round 1  Treatment Round 1 Treatment: 1/2 Control: 1/2 “Want to survey me?
Language:English
Score: 738630.27 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...s/presentation/wcms_326491.pdf
Data Source: un
In order to maximize the impact of company’s contribution in achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals, Siemens is committed to work with partners to deepen understanding of concrete needs in countries in support of the UN Secretary General’s Global Strategy on Women’s and Children’s Health. To kick off this process, in collaboration with the Global Strategy’s Innovation Working Group (IWG), the Partnership for Maternal and Children’s Health (PMNCH) and the World Vision International (WVI), a workshop meeting took place during the 2011 World Health Assembly in Geneva. (...) Sustainable business models which address public health needs have to be developed for most impact Beyond the pure provision of technology, especially the reliability of service and customer specific training have been identified as key success factors, which can be addressed by Siemens in collaboration with partners. (...) Siemens is willing to pass on these cost advantages to the countries. However, procurement of individual products is still predominant.
Language:English
Score: 736852.25 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...11/201105_siemens_workshop/en/
Data Source: un
PMNCH | World Prematurity Day Access Home Alt+0 Content Alt+2 Search Search Navigation Home About Our work News and events Knowledge centre Get involved Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Menu News and events Press centre Newsletter Videos Social media World Prematurity Day 17 November 2013 | GLOBAL Press release Excerpt of press release from: Every Woman Every Child, GAPPS, London School of hygiene & Tropical Medicine, March of Dimes, The Partnership for Maternal Newborn and Child Health, Save the Children and UNICEF Baby boys at higher risk of death and disability due to preterm birth Ground breaking global studies on preterm birth and disability carried out by almost 50 researchers at 35 institutions and launched in association with World Prematurity Day finds baby boys are at a higher risk of death and disability due to preterm birth than baby girls. (...) Even in the womb, girls mature more rapidly than boys, which provides an advantage, because the lungs and other organs are more developed,” says Professor Joy Lawn, M.D., PhD, a neonatologist and epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and team leader of the new research. (...) However, after the first month of life, in some societies where girls receive less nutrition and medical care, the girls are more likely to die than boys, despite this biological survival advantage for girls. Read more: download the joint partner press release: English pdf, 890kb French pdf, 920kb Spanish pdf, 1.11Mb « Previous page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next page » Introduction Partners address issues of newborn health on World Prematurity Day Press release World Prematurity Day journal articles and comments MamaYe infographic World Prematurity Day 2013 round-up You are here: Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health News and events Calendar All 2013 Events Quick Links Key documents PMNCH vision Strategy and workplan Annual report PMNCH pamphlet Stay informed PMNCH e-blast Press centre Knowledge centre Get involved Become a member Requests for proposals Employment Share your news Contact us Keep in touch © WHO 2022
Language:English
Score: 735430 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...events/2013/wpd/en/index2.html
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Primary health care will address adverse childhood experiences 14 May 2019 UNICEF/2019 Available in: English Македонски Skopje, 13 May 2019: UNICEF launched a new pilot initiative to assess the negative effects of adverse childhood experiences on health risk behavior and wellbeing as adults through screening among patients in 10 primary health care settings in Skopje. (...) A recent study in North Macedonia, confirms ACE is linked to risky health behavior, chronic health conditions and low life potential. (...) The study finds a general trend that as the number of adverse childhood experiences increased, so did health-risk behaviours, implying an association with longer-term poor health outcomes.
Language:English
Score: 733328.5 - https://www.unicef.org/northma...-adverse-childhood-experiences
Data Source: un
Conclusions 1 The Protocol on Water and Health Conclusions of the workshop Workshop on Reporting under the Protocol on Water and Health Geneva, 16-17 February 2010 Pierre Studer, Chairperson TFIR 2 The Protocol on Water and Health General conclusions - 1General conclusions - 1 All countries represented at the workshop informed that they will submit the reports to the secretariat by the end of March Reporting is straightforward when targets have been set, more difficult when there is an intersectoral coordination mechanism but not targets are adopted, and very difficult, if not impossible, when there is no cooperation Not just any information should be included: the report should be a picture of where the country is in the implementation of the Protocol. 3 The Protocol on Water and Health General conclusions - 2General conclusions - 2 Reporting is complex but useful and Parties should take advantage of the process in particular to review the targets they have established or to advance the setting of targets if this is not completed To be able to analyse the results and to address them within the programme of work of the Protocol on 2011-2013 it is crucial that Parties and other interested countries submit their report by 31 March 2010. Preparation of national report is a long exercise, many Parties seem to be late and should speed up their national process 4 The Protocol on Water and Health General conclusions - 3General conclusions - 3 Intersectoral cooperation continue to be one of the main challenges, also for reporting. At the same time reporting provides a trigger to strengthen intersectoral cooperation (one of the advantages) Reporting through an intersectoral coordination can in particular allow identifying needs that might have not been detected at the sectoral level and that can become the subject of a future target The same intersectoral coordination group/platform that is responsible for target setting should be also responsible for reporting 5 The Protocol on Water and Health General conclusions - 4General conclusions - 4 For some of the questions raised during the workshop (e.g. definitions), explanations are available in the template itself or in the guidelines for setting targets, evaluation of progress and reporting => countries should carefully study the guidelines developed under the Protocol Monitoring systems, data collection, analysis and storage are crucial for the implementation of the Protocol and for reporting and if gaps are identified in the reporting process these can become the subject of a future target 6 The Protocol on Water and Health General conclusions - 5General conclusions - 5 It is important the national reports respect the length limit of 50 pages When writing their reports, countries should think about the usefulness and readability of the informationfor other countries It is important to take stocks of lessons learned in the preparation of the report: both on the substance and on the process.
Language:English
Score: 732720.56 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA.../Presentations/Conclusions.pdf
Data Source: un
But men are also affected: regular long hours of work have negative consequences on their health and their ability to contribute fully to the upbringing of their children. (...) Advantages: State-regulated arrangements for leave and part-time work. (...) Decent working time arrangements should promote health and safety and gender equality, be family-friendly, advance enterprise productivity and competitiveness, and facilitate worker’s choice and influence over working hours.
Language:English
Score: 732524.2 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_101648.pdf
Data Source: un
There are no specific references to women in cities in the Beijing Platform for Action and its follow-up but a number of references to important elements of the urban environment, such as water, sanitation, transport and health care. On the other hand, all the critical areas of concern in the Platform for Action have relevance for women in cities, including poverty, education, health, economy, decision-making, human rights, violence, conflict, environment, and media. 2 At the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II), in Istanbul in 1996, the City Summit placed great importance on women’s concerns and led to a series of commitments by national governments within the framework of the Habitat Programme. (...) The urban environment can be a site of both empowerment and exploitation for women. Cities offer many advantages for women; but there are also many challenges. Compared with rural areas, many cities offer better facilities and services, such as water, transport, education, child care and health care. They provide more opportunities for social, economic, cultural and political participation.
Language:English
Score: 729836.5 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...0in%20cities%20CSW%20event.pdf
Data Source: un