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And just like globalization, many of our countries have failed to take full advantage of the benefits of increased migration. Indeed there are some undisputable advantages of international migration to the development of countries. (...) This has seriously hampered delivery of health services. 2 Brain drain is a serious deterrent for sustainable development. (...) However transnational criminal elements have also taken advantage of the situation to launch their criminal activities including trafficking of women and children.
Language:English
Score: 727398.44 - https://www.un.org/webcast/migration/pdfs/malawi-e.pdf
Data Source: un
IR can help to ensure that health solutions reach the people who need them and are used in ways that generate intended results. (...) No technical or scientific background is required, though a health background will be an advantage.  The course starts on 22 Febraury 2021. (...) No technical or scientific background is required, though a health background will be an advantage.  The course starts on 29 March 2021.
Language:English
Score: 727155.37 - https://www.who.int/tdr/capacity/strengthening/mooc/en/
Data Source: un
UN Womenwatch | The UN System and Rural Women - Joint Programme: Accelerating Progress toward the Economic Empowerment of Rural Women UN System & Rural Women Introduction Education & Training Health Access Food Security Social Protection Decent Work Markets Climate Change Policy Decision-making FAO Comparative Advantage Good Practices 1 Good Practices 2 IFAD Comparative Advantage Good Practices ITC-ILO Comparative Advantage SPFII Comparative Advantage Good Practices UNCTAD Comparative Advantage UNDP Comparative Advantage Good Practices UNESCO Comparative Advantage UNFPA Comparative Advantage Good Practices 1 Good Practices 2 UN Women Comparative Advantage Good Practices WFP Good Practices WHO Comparative Advantage Good Practices Joint Efforts Facts & Figures Related News Related Resources Joint Programme: Accelerating Progress towards the Economic Empowerment of Rural Women In support of rural women's economic empowerment UN Women, FAO, IFAD and WFP are spearheading a more comprehensive UN system response through joint actions in the format of a 5-year pilot programme.
Language:English
Score: 726607.9 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...mpowerment-of-rural-women.html
Data Source: un
Moreover, when children from urban and rural households with similar levels of wealth are compared, the urban advantage is no longer apparent.   “Children should be a focus of urban planning, yet in many cities they are forgotten, with millions of children cut-off from social services in urban slums and informal settlements, and exposed to environmental or health hazards due to overcrowding,” Chandy added. (...) The report is based on an analysis of 80 surveys (Demographic and Health Survey, DHS, and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, MICS) from 77 countries conducted between 2011 and 2016. (...) Read the story Article “These are happy moments”: reactions to UNICEF intervention In schools and health facilities in rural communities, officials have been reacting to UNICEF’s intervention.
Language:English
Score: 726076.86 - https://www.unicef.org/gambia/...kely-die-young-and-less-likely
Data Source: un
The WHO-managed allocation of the AGFUND’s funding worth of 300 million MNT (150.000 USD) for setting up the E-Learning Centre at the MNUMS and its three branches as well as production of interactive training programmes on various public health subjects, like Primary Ear and Hearing Care, COPD, Аsthma, Allergic Rhinitis, Chronic Kidney Diseases, is a demonstration of taking full advantage of the good internet connectivity in Mongolia. (...) The launching ceremony was attended by Head of the MNUMS Board, ex-Minister of Health, Mr. S Lambaa, MNUMS’s senior management, WHO, ADB and Global Fund representatives. Related Link: Country Programme on e-Health and m-Health Quick links Newsroom Emergencies Head of WHO Office Careers Regional links Data Publications Campaigns Help Contact us Email scams Privacy Integrity Hotline Privacy legal notice © 2022 WHO
Language:English
Score: 725388.33 - https://www.who.int/mongolia/n...f-medical-sciences-of-mongolia
Data Source: un
.) % needing solidarity NHI 2.650 58.6 Old Age 2.150 48.2 TOTAL 2.450 54.7 Mix of Financing Mechanisms and Health Services in Aruba SERVICES-ACTIVITIES FINANCING Public health- disease control, health promotion Taxes Ambulatory care – preventive and curative Taxes, Univ. health insurance, Out of the pocket Hospital care Univ. health insurance, Complementary private health insurance Institutional long-term care Taxes and Out of the pocket Drugs and diagnostics Universal health insurance, Complementary private health insurance, Out of the pocket Research and training Taxes, Grants, Out of the pocket Some advantages of the NHI • broad non contributory coverage, • more transparency in terms of healthcare expenditures, • enhanced accessibility to healthcare by the needy, foreigners and the elderly, • more targeted funds for healthcare, • provides a mechanism for cost control, • more choices for the patients and better incentives for the providers of healthcare. SECOND INTERGOBERNMENTAL REGIONAL CONFERENCEON AGEINGBrasilia, Brazil, 4 to 6 December, 2007 LOCATION: 14 miles north of the coast of VenezuelaPOPULATION: 106.000 (end 2006) POLITICAL SYSTEM: autonomous part of the Ki Social Welfare System Recommended steps by ILO to prevent Old age/Survivors’ funds to exhaust by 2025 Income distribution in the year 2005 ‘Break-even point’ for funds and % of people needing solidarity (2005)- Government grant for NHI included - Mix of Financing Mechanisms and Health Services in Aruba Some advantages of the NHI
Language:English
Score: 725388.33 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...es/presentations/wmarchena.pdf
Data Source: un
Professional norms and expertise regarding manpower requirements for health services delivery are also incorporated into this approach, in order to discover the most cost-effective method of meeting health care needs. d Assumptions: This approach seeks to address all health care needs and assumes that the use of resources will be prioritized based on need (O’Brian-Pallas et al, 2001a; O’Brian- Pallas, et al, 2001b; Hall and Mejia, 1978; Markham and Birch, 1997; O’Brian-Pallas et al, 2001a, as cited in Dreesch et al, 2005). d Advantages: This approach is centered on improving the efficiency of a combination of HRH resources to deliver health care services. (...) These targets are then translated into staffing requirements for personnel and productivity norms for health care facilities (Dreesch et al, 2005; Hall, 2001). d Assumptions: The service-target approach assumes that health services standards can be met by health workers and facilities within a specified amount of time (Hall and Mejia, 1978; Markham and Birch, 1997; O’Brian- Pallas et al, 2001a, as cited in Dreesch et al, 2005). d Advantages: Projections based on the service- target approach account for some of the complexity of the relationships between variables and can complement other projection methods. (...) Health worker time requirements are also estimated and converted into full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each intervention. d Assumptions: The adjusted service target- based approach assumes that evidence-based interventions can be effectively implemented in all circumstances (Dreesch et al, 2005). d Advantages: This competency-based approach identifies critical health workforce skills, providing guidance for future training initiatives.
Language:English
Score: 725310.16 - https://www.who.int/workforcea...liance/knowledge/toolkit/4.pdf
Data Source: un
27-30 million children missed out on immunisation every year 3 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 The GAVI Alliance - Structure 4 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 A unique Alliance • Bringing together partners utilising their specific expertise to overcome problems that no one partner working alone could effectively address • High level: major leaders in international health and development, great potential to affect decision making • 360 degree engagement: developing countries, donors, industry, civil society, multilateral agencies and others • Now working to improve collaboration with civil society organisations (CSOs), through a new type of support in GAVI- eligible countries 5 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 Coordination at Country Level • As an Alliance, GAVI relies on partners presence in countries. • An Inter-agency Coordination Committee (ICC) helps guide the application process and assists government for traditional GAVI support • The national Health System Coordination Committee (HSCC) or equivalent, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health planning department (or similar), has overall responsibility for GAVI HSS • Support should be country-driven and aligned with existing plans 6 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 An Alliance of Partners: the benefits • Global Health partnerships like GAVI have some clear advantages: – flexible, quick-adapting – foster innovation by combining best of public and private sector – high visibility enables generation of new resources for health – engage new actors – a focused message – provides longer-term commitments to countries 7 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 Predictable financing • A strategic goal: increase the predictability and sustainability of long-term financing • Seek multi-year commitment from traditional donors • Current ODA flows are not sufficient to achieve MDGs - IFFIm provides long-term, predictable and targeted financing needed to scale up immunisation and health system strengthening • AMC is an innovative solution to a market based problem. February 2007 launch of AMC pneumo pilot 8 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 • Estimated additional children reached with GAVI support (2001-06) – Hepatitis B: 126 million – Hib: 20 million – DTP3: 28 million – Yellow Fever: 17 million Results: Progress to date • African region DTP3 coverage increased from 46% (1999) to 67% (2005) • 1.7 million cumulative deaths already averted • It is projected that, as of 2006, more than 2.3 million future deaths will have been prevented through GAVI Alliance support (600,000 in 2006 alone). 9 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 9 Health Systems Strengthening (HSS) US$500 million (2006 – 2010) funding will provide flexible grants to GAVI-eligible countries for: – Recruiting and training health care workers – Building and strengthening systems to distribute vaccines and other child health care packages – Transporting health care workers and equipment – Infrastructure investments 10 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 HSS principles • Country driven • Country aligned • Harmonized • Predictable • Additional HSS process helps support countries to overcome health systems barriers in delivering child health packages. (...) • Listen to countries first and foremost • Be prepared to change guidelines/plans • Technical assistance critical for developing high quality proposals • In-country review process crucial for success • Strong links between partners and between immunisation and broader health sector planning processes are important • All partners should be included - especially Civil Society and private sector WHO 12 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 Harmonisation and Alignment Advantages of global health partnerships will fade unless: – Collaboration with other health sector stakeholders is emphasised – Broader-based support to systems is expanded – Emphasis on minimising transaction costs at country level – Strengthen existing systems rather than creating parallel processes 13 Partners’ Forum 18 April 2007 Links with the broader health systems strengthening agenda • Accountability to the OECD / DAC principles and indicators with emphasis on alignment and harmonization • ‘Scaling up for better health’ / MDG 4+5 business plan / G8 German led social health protection agenda – importance of coordinated efforts • Need to link with other Global partnerships GFATM, HMN, PMNCH, Global Health Workforce Alliance, Stop TB, Roll Back Malaria, UNAIDS, civil society etc
Language:English
Score: 724677.93 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/events/2007/palaciospres1804.pdf
Data Source: un
Right now, for example, we are rolling out an initiative in the Pacific that will help deliver digital services in education, agriculture and health in support of recovery.  The Smart Islands initiative is one of the many projects undertaken by ITU since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic to boost digital transformation in the hardest-to-connect communities, including SIDS. (...) One factor is that people do not know how to take advantage of the technology. Other factors include lack of awareness of the advantages of connecting, lack of relevant local content online in the local language, and in particular the cost of connection, which is still much higher in SIDS than most countries. (...) Digital skills must be developed to fully take advantage of the technology. ITU/UNICEF initiatives such as GIGA to connect every school to the Internet, and the ITU/ILO Digital Skills project to encourage youth to take advantage of the work opportunities of the technology, as well as the ITU Academy online educational platform and our Digital Transformation Centers are all working to this end.
Language:English
Score: 724308.4 - https://www.itu.int/en/osg/dsg...speeches/Pages/2021-09-14.aspx
Data Source: un
Development of an Airport Emergency Plan for Public Health Events. 1. What is Annex 14? 2. What emergencies does it address in addition to those of public health? (...) Is it necessary for there to be a separate public health emergency airport plan (separate from the aerodrome emergency plan) 4. (...) Which entity issues an aerodrome certificate for those aerodromes that are incompliance with the ICAO Standards and Recommended Practice? 7. What is the advantage of having an aerodrome public health emergency plan 8.
Language:English
Score: 723013.57 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...20Public%20Health%20Events.pdf
Data Source: un