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NATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE TREATMENT OF OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING IN CPI : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
With regard to legal forms of ownership, 41.8 per cent of dwellings were owner-occupied, 38 per cent were rented dwellings (of which over two thirds were in state-owned and municipal houses), and 18.9 per cent were dwellings of the members of building cooperatives. (...) The Swedish model for owner-occupiers’ housing costs in the CPI includes mortgage interest, interest on own equity, depreciation, ground rent, repairs and maintenance, insurance, water and sewerage charges, electricity, heating and property tax. (...) The same average interest rate is applied both on the amount borrowed and on the owner’s own equity. There are three different types of borrowing in Sweden - from the state, from housing finance institutions and from banks.
Language:English
Score: 945981.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...et?open&DS=CES/AC.49/66&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems | UNECE Skip to main content English Advanced Search   Main navigation About UNECE Executive Secretary Mission Organizational structure Secretariat Executive Committee Commission Legal instruments Work with us Our work Economic Cooperation & Integration Environmental Policy Forests Housing & Land Population Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes High-impact Areas Circular Economy Gender SPECA Technical cooperation THE PEP UN SG's Special Envoy for Road Safety UN Road Safety Fund UN cooperation in the UNECE region Regional Forum on Sustainable Development SDGs Open UNECE Events Meetings & Events Information for Delegates Coronavirus Advisory Publications Media Executive Secretary's Blog News Press Releases Covid-19 Press Releases Speeches Stories UNECE Weekly Videos More options Housing and Land Management Housing and Land Management About us Secretariat Composition The Committee Bureau of the Committee History of the Committee The Working Party Bureau of the Working Party Terms of Reference REM Advisory Group members Brochures Geneva UN Charter on Sustainable Housing Geneva UN Charter Centres of Excellence Regional Action Plan 2030 Areas of Work Sustainable Housing and Real Estate Markets Affordable and Social Housing, Housing Finance Past activities Energy Efficiency in Buildings Sustainable Urban Development Sustainable Smart Cities Forum of Mayors National Urban Policies Land Administration and Management Land Administration Reviews Country Profiles on Urban Development, Housing and Land Management Projects Inter-regional cooperation for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda Norwegian project Post COVID-19 Recovery in Informal Settlements in the ECE Region UNDA 13th tranche project on building economic resilience after COVID-19 UNDA 12th tranche project on innovative financing for sustainable smart cities UNDA 11th tranche UNDA 10th tranche UNDA 9th tranche Armenia Training materials Meetings and Events Publications and reports Standards Press Releases Videos Contact us Quick links Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems Housing and Land Management Land administration Published: October 2021 This publication is based on the “Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems” presented at the Twelfth Session of the Working Party on Land Administration in 2021. (...) It includes best practices in the detection and prevention of fraud in land registration systems, necessitated by the public electronic availability of land and owner information in ECE member States. Its findings cover three main areas: accessibility of systems, experience of fraud and countermeasures.
Language:English
Score: 945034.1 - https://unece.org/info/Housing...and-Land-Management/pub/361158
Data Source: un
THE TREATMENT OF NON-MARKET GOODS IN CPI : OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING : PAPER / BY THE UNITED KINGDOM
Methodological options for measuring owner-occupiers’ housing costs - Acquisition 11. (...) In the United Kingdom, there is very little privately rented housing and even less that is broadly comparable with owner-occupied housing. (...) Have countries developed their treatment of owner-occupiers’ housing costs in the CPI to meet specific uses?
Language:English
Score: 944586.3 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...et?open&DS=CES/AC.49/41&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
. … has a fth of native forests on the Earth ...has ... houses one third of the globe’s freshwater reserves ... has ... concentrates more than BIOFUEL ARABLE SOILS FORESTS ... is home to an important part of global mining reserves … houses the biggest biological diversity in the word and various of the megadiverse countries To adapt with progressivity criteria the percentage the state receives from the exploitation of natural resources. (...) To foster a State policy oriented towards a structural change with long-term productive diversication. 12% 25% 20% Ag Cu 49% 44% Sn Li 33% 65% of arable soils in the world biofuel on the Earth of world´s oil reserves In order to maximize the contribution of this wealth to sustainable development, the Economic Comission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) promotes the governance of natural resources as a set of sovereign policies regarding management of a given property and the appropriation and distribution of income coming from its exploitation. participate in the exploitation of resources (either through public companies or by owning shares of another kind of enterprise) To glean income from the export of these products, states usually can: use scal instruments (income tax or royalties) 1/3 Constitutions of all countries in the region recognize the State as the owner of underground resources.
Language:English
Score: 942972.7 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...fographic/files/eclac_rrnn.pdf
Data Source: un
The Israelis simply sent a notice to each property-owner stating that they were taking over the land and that the owner was to go to the bank to collect the price thereof. (...) The witness referred to various types of pressure used to force Palestinians to leave their homes, including the cutting-off of water; repeated imprisonment of land owners or leaders of refugee camps with the offer to release them if they would sign a paper agreeing to leave the area; refusal to allow their children to attend school, and confiscation and destruction of houses owned by Palestinians living abroad. 4. (...) Responding to various questions, the witness said that only a few of the original owners had been paid for the houses that had been destroyed.
Language:English
Score: 942776 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-188041/
Data Source: un
WORKSHOP ON MANAGEMENT OF THE HOUSING STOCK : REPORT / PREPARED BY THE DELEGATION OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE SECRETARIAT
With the adoption of laws on property and on the privatization of the State-owned and municipal housing stock, private individuals and legal entities also became owners. (...) Among these, the most important are: (a) Owner-occupied housing, including indirect ownership: - Housing cooperatives; - Owner-occupied flats in multi- flat buildings (condominiums) organized as homeowners’ associations; - Owner-occupied flats in multi- flat buildings organized as joint-stock companies; and - Owner-occupied, single-family houses. (...) It was assumed that the new private owners would take on the full organizational, economic and financial responsibilities for their housing units.
Language:English
Score: 940128.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce.../get?open&DS=HBP/2004/3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Household consumption expenditure...................................................................................... 28 Basic concepts and definitions ................................................................................................ 28 Timing of consumption........................................................................................................... 29 iv ICLS-R-2003-06-0049-1-EN.Doc/v1 Consumption expenditure ....................................................................................................... 30 Consumption expenditure on durable goods and owner-occupied housing............................ 31 Acquisition approach .................................................................................................... 31 Payments approach ....................................................................................................... 31 Consumption approach ................................................................................................. 32 Conclusion .................................................................................................................... 33 Operational definitions............................................................................................................ 34 Goods acquired from the market, own produced or received as income in-kind.......... 34 Goods received as transfers from outside the household.............................................. 35 Services acquired from the market ............................................................................... 35 Own production of services .......................................................................................... 39 Services received as transfers from other households, NPISHs and government......... 40 Other issues................................................................................................................... 40 Household expenditure............................................................................................................ 40 Exclusions ............................................................................................................................... 41 Business expenditures................................................................................................... 41 Investment expenditures ............................................................................................... 41 Annex 3: Operational and conceptual treatment of expenditure items ................................... 42 5. (...) Classification, estimation, analysis and dissemination .......................................................... 62 Classification........................................................................................................................... 62 Valuation methods .................................................................................................................. 63 Income in kind (goods and services), transfers and own production (goods)............... 63 Owner-occupied dwelling............................................................................................. 64 Durable goods............................................................................................................... 68 Social transfers in kind ................................................................................................. 68 Estimation ............................................................................................................................... 69 Analysis................................................................................................................................... 70 Dissemination.......................................................................................................................... 73 8. (...) It consists of employee income (e.g. wages) and self-employment income (return to labour); (2) property income from ownership of financial and other assets, e.g. interest payments; (3) income from household production of services for own consumption, e.g. services of owner-occupied housing, household production of domestic services for own consumption; (4) transfers received in cash and goods from government (e.g. pensions), other households (e.g. alimony, parental support) and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISH) (e.g. scholarships, strike pay); (5) transfers received as services, e.g. social transfers in kind (STIK), care services from other households.
Language:English
Score: 938644.3 - https://www.ilo.org/public/eng...t/download/17thicls/r2hies.pdf
Data Source: un
Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems | UNECE Skip to main content English Advanced Search   Main navigation About UNECE Executive Secretary Mission Organizational structure Secretariat Executive Committee Commission Legal instruments Work with us Our work Economic Cooperation & Integration Environmental Policy Forests Housing & Land Population Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes High-impact Areas Circular Economy Gender SPECA Technical cooperation THE PEP UN SG's Special Envoy for Road Safety UN Road Safety Fund UN cooperation in the UNECE region Regional Forum on Sustainable Development SDGs Open UNECE Events Meetings & Events Information for Delegates Coronavirus Advisory Publications Media Executive Secretary's Blog News Press Releases Covid-19 Press Releases Speeches Stories UNECE Weekly Videos UNECE Publications Housing-and-Land-Management More options Publications (default menu) Publications Historical documents Compendium of Legal Instruments 2015 Newsletter in Russian A short history of UNECE (1947-2007) Annual Report What UNECE does for you Sustainable Development Briefs Reports to ECOSOC Other UNECE Discussion Papers Housing and Land Management Housing and Land Management About us Secretariat Composition The Committee Bureau of the Committee History of the Committee The Working Party Bureau of the Working Party Terms of Reference REM Advisory Group members Brochures Geneva UN Charter on Sustainable Housing Geneva UN Charter Centres of Excellence Regional Action Plan 2030 Areas of Work Sustainable Housing and Real Estate Markets Affordable and Social Housing, Housing Finance Past activities Energy Efficiency in Buildings Sustainable Urban Development Sustainable Smart Cities Forum of Mayors National Urban Policies Land Administration and Management Land Administration Reviews Country Profiles on Urban Development, Housing and Land Management Projects Inter-regional cooperation for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda Norwegian project Post COVID-19 Recovery in Informal Settlements in the ECE Region UNDA 13th tranche project on building economic resilience after COVID-19 UNDA 12th tranche project on innovative financing for sustainable smart cities UNDA 11th tranche UNDA 10th tranche UNDA 9th tranche Armenia Training materials Meetings and Events Publications and reports Standards Press Releases Videos Contact us Quick links Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems Housing and Land Management Land administration Published: October 2021 This publication is based on the “Study on Fraud in Land Administration Systems” presented at the Twelfth Session of the Working Party on Land Administration in 2021. (...) It includes best practices in the detection and prevention of fraud in land registration systems, necessitated by the public electronic availability of land and owner information in ECE member States. Its findings cover three main areas: accessibility of systems, experience of fraud and countermeasures.
Language:English
Score: 938539.5 - https://unece.org/housing-and-...ud-land-administration-systems
Data Source: un
CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP OF HOUSING : DISCUSSION PAPER / PREPARED BY G. GUNDERSEN, CHAIRMAN, HOUSING AND URBAN MANAGEMENT ADVISORY NETWORK
HBP/2002/6 page 3 Statement 4: Condominium ownership of housing requires owners to have clear rights and obligations. (...) This combination of low-income owners and the need for investment in operation, maintenance and repair of the run-down housing stock is not sustainable in the medium or longer term. One solution is to introduce public sector housing support systems guaranteeing the ability of low-income owners to meet the financial obligations stemming from the ownership.
Language:English
Score: 937982.6 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce.../get?open&DS=HBP/2002/6&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING : FEASIBILITY OF A COST-ORIENTED APPROACH : DOCUMENT / SUBMITTED BY THE SWISS FEDERAL STATISTICS OFFICE
Scope for, and consequences of, covering owner-occupied housing in the CPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5. (...) treated the USAL structure as being similar to that of owner-occupied housing, as the chief differences between the two types of housing are to be found in financing costs and, to a lesser extent, in conditions of ownership. (...) These omissions weigh against it: it is unlikely that explicit inclusion of a specially designed owner-occupied housing index number in the CPI will work better as an indicator than current practice (including the share of owner-occupied housing in the weighting for rents).
Language:English
Score: 936362.5 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...et?open&DS=CES/AC.49/49&Lang=E
Data Source: ods