Home

Results 21 - 30 of 80,937 for illness. Search took 1.342 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
Integrated management of ill children in facilities and health centres 2. (...) In particular this applies to providing care for LBW babies, identifying newborns with signs of severe illness and facilitating timely referral, and improving the quality of care for newborn illness at primary and referral care facilities. (...) Programmes can use checklists to assess the quality of newborn care, which can help gauge case management of ill babies and development of health worker skills.
Language:English
Score: 672063.8 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...blications/aonsectionIII_5.pdf
Data Source: un
WHO | The costs of maternal–newborn illness and mortality Skip to main content Access Home Alt+0 Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 Search Search the WHO .int site Submit Advanced search Navigation Home Health topics Data Media centre Publications Countries Programmes Governance About WHO Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Sexual and reproductive health Menu Sexual and reproductive health What's new? Topics Publications HRP research programme About us Staff Contact us The costs of maternal–newborn illness and mortality Authors : Islam, M. Kamrul / Gerdtham, Ulf-G. Publication details Number of pages : 40 Publication date : 2006 Languages : English ISBN : 92 4 159449 7 - Web only Downloads Full text [2.1Mb] The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the estimation of the cost of illness (COI) related to maternal– newborn ill-health (MNIH).
Language:English
Score: 671106 - https://www.who.int/reproducti...erinatal_health/9241594497/en/
Data Source: un
Topics Publications HRP research programme About us Staff Contact us The effect of maternal-newborn ill-health on households. Economic vulnerability and social implications Authors : Hutton, Guy Publication details Number of pages : 32 Publication date : 2006 Languages : English ISBN : 92 4 159448 9 - Web only Downloads Full text [2.1Mb] Pregnancy and childbirth are wonderful and life-changing events. They can also bring potential for illness and suffering. Women from economically developing societies are especially vulnerable during these periods. The overall objective of this paper is to undertake a review of the evidence base on economic vulnerability and social implications in relation to maternal and newborn ill-health, and to highlight the major gaps in this evidence base.
Language:English
Score: 669442.33 - https://www.who.int/reproducti...erinatal_health/9241594489/en/
Data Source: un
Everyone is also meant to be self-monitoring – having a close awareness of any illness and regularly checking for fever Anyone who is ill or tests positive for an active infection (PCR) should be in isolation – see below for details Home care of an ill person in isolation can be done safely – see below for details The World Health Organization recommends that you continue to isolate yourself for 14 days after your symptoms have resolved. (...) If you or someone in your household has mild to moderate respiratory illness or the key findings of coronavirus (fever, cough, malaise, or respiratory symptoms), isolation is required. (...) When to stop isolation For patients who were ill: At least 10 days have passed since the start of the illness AND At least 72 hours have passed since any symptoms have completely stopped For patients who never had symptoms (asymptomatic cases): At least 10 days have passed since COVID-19 positive PCR test (nasal swab) Advice for breastfeeding and infant care For infants, seek medical advice from their pediatrician on how to continue to breastfeed safely.
Language:English
Score: 668311.13 - https://www.un.org/en/node/63387
Data Source: un
Although most people with COVID-19 experience mild symptoms or moderate illness, approximately 10-15% of cases progress to severe disease, and about 5% become critically ill. (...) This persistent state of ill health is known as ‘post COVID condition’ but other names are also used to describe the condition. (...) The majority of patients surveyed (85%) were outpatients with mild illness. Patients that are admitted to intensive care units may experience Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) which is a condition where health problems remain after critical illness.
Language:English
Score: 667384.67 - https://www.who.int/srilanka/n...0-2021-post-covid-19-condition
Data Source: un
WHO Delivers Medicines for the Treatment of Mental Illness to the oPt - Article - Question of Palestine Skip to content Welcome to the United Nations عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Search for: Home About The Committee on Palestinian Rights Division for Palestinian Rights Key Topics Key issues at stake The Quartet History Fast facts The Committee Background Bureau Membership Mandate and Objectives Areas of Activities Working Group Reports Statements Newsletters Events Upcoming Events Committee Meetings International Conferences and Side Events Delegation visits Solidarity Day Capacity Building Programme UNISPAL About UNISPAL Search Document Collection Map Collection Civil Society Overview Responsibilities of Civil Society Partners NGO Action News Get accredited Benefits of accreditation Civil Society Partners UN System FAQ Search for: WHO Delivers Medicines for the Treatment of Mental Illness to the oPt – Article Home / WHO Delivers Medicines for the Treatment of Mental Illness to the oPt – Article WHO Delivers Medicines for the Treatment of Mental Illness to the oPt – Article Download Document Files: [get_file_name file_url=”https://www.un.org/unispal/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/WHOARTICLE_280618.pdf“] Document Type: Article Document Sources: World Health Organization (WHO) Subject: Assistance , Health Publication Date: 28/06/2018 URL source: http://www.emro.who.int/pdf/pse/palestine-news/who-delivers-medicines-for-the-treatment-of-mental-illness-to-the-occupied-palestinian-territory.pdf?
Language:English
Score: 664500.44 - https://www.un.org/unispal/doc...al-illness-to-the-opt-article/
Data Source: un
Develop understanding and support for people with mental illnesses within local communities and the population at large. (...) Although a great number of people in Palestine have a mentally ill relative, they often cannot identify the illness. (...) Now people are not ashamed of having a mentally ill person in their family, and the patients themselves have made considerable progress."
Language:English
Score: 664272.8 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-193643/
Data Source: un
“We are alarmed at Israel’s failure to prosecute, punish and redress the torture and ill-treatment perpetrated against Mr Al-Arbeed. (...) Within 48 hours, Al-Arbeed was hospitalised with life-threatening injuries due to ill-treatment and now suffers irreparable physical and psychological conditions. “We are alarmed that the use of so-called ‘enhanced interrogation techniques’ or ‘exceptional measures’ during questioning reportedly led to a forced confession, which the universal prohibition of torture and ill-treatment aims to prevent,” the experts said.
Language:English
Score: 664201.66 - https://www.un.org/unispal/doc...-and-ill-treatment-un-experts/
Data Source: un
Sick pay and compensation: a brief overview of variety Illness and injury not only affect the physical and mental health of workers. (...) Distinctions can be drawn, for example, in terms of how far schemes focus attention on the prevention of illness or injury, the provision of financial support (and security) and the rehabilitation and return to work of workers who have experienced ill health and injury. (...) In other words, those most prone to ill health tend to be labouring in work situations less supportive of good health.
Language:English
Score: 664035.8 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...enericdocument/wcms_681841.pdf
Data Source: un
Everyone is also meant to be self-monitoring – having a close awareness of any illness and regularly checking for fever Anyone who is ill or tests positive for an active infection (PCR) should be in isolation – see below for details Home care of an ill person in isolation can be done safely – see below for details The World Health Organization recommends that you continue to isolate yourself for 14 days after your symptoms have resolved. (...) If you or someone in your household has mild to moderate respiratory illness or the key findings of coronavirus (fever, cough, malaise, or respiratory symptoms), isolation is required. (...) When to stop isolation For patients who were ill: At least 10 days have passed since the start of the illness AND At least 72 hours have passed since any symptoms have completely stopped For patients who never had symptoms (asymptomatic cases): At least 10 days have passed since COVID-19 positive PCR test (nasal swab) Advice for breastfeeding and infant care For infants, seek medical advice from their pediatrician on how to continue to breastfeed safely.
Language:English
Score: 654526.17 - https://www.un.org/en/coronavirus/home-care-and-isolation
Data Source: un