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A written performance improvement plan was signed by the Applicant and her first and second reporting officers on 6 January 2012. 5. (...) UNDT/2012/117 Page 3 of 7 8. The performance improvement plan was reviewed on 20 June 2012. On this occasion, the Applicant’s first reporting officer observed that she had improved in the competency of planning and organizing but that she had not been able to improve the communication competency. 9. (...) In addition, the end-of-cycle appraisal “should have not given immediate reason to enforce the performance improvement plan” as she had met two of the three goals identified in the performance improvement plan and she had been assessed as fully competent in the core values.
Language:English
Score: 643580.8 - www.un.org/en/internalj...dt/judgments/undt-2012-117.pdf
Data Source: oaj
Trade liberalization is among several factors that can improve the allocation of resources at national and international levels, and hence improve the resilience to external shocks. (...) While recognizing current efforts to strengthen the financial architecture, Members wished to improve their understanding of the trade and trade policy implications of a perceived greater volatility of financial markets and exchange rates world-wide. - Trade-financing [ 1 ] . Based mainly on experience gained in Asia and elsewhere (in the 1990s), there is a need to improve the stability and security of sources of trade-financing, especially to help deal with periods of financial crisis.
Language:English
Score: 643510.94 - https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/devel_e/wgtdf_e.htm
Data Source: un
Hubert Jenny, Senior Project Engineer Southeast Asia Department, Infrastructure Division Asian Development Bank hjenny@adb.org UN-DESA Capacity Building Workshop Partnership for Improving the Performance of the Water Utilities in the Asia & Pacific Region Bangkok July 2006 2 ADB Water Strategy • Under Review (2006) Linkage with Urban Strategy (also under review) • Principles – Promote National Focus of Sector Reform – Foster Integrated Management Water Resources – Improve / Expand Water Services Delivery – Foster Water Conservation / Increase Efficiencies – Promote Regional Cooperation – Facilitate Exchange Water Sector Information &Experience – Improve Governance • Safeguards (Environment, Resettlement, Ethnic Minority) and Procurement Compliance 3 Rationale for PPP & Private Sector Participation • Relieve Local and Provincial Government of operational responsibility for utilities • Lower cost of service / Clarify internal budget transfer and true cost of the water • Increase access: MDG 7 • Improve level of service: Benchmarking, including Non Revenue Water 4 PPP / PSP Objectives • Achieve complete managerial, financial & operational autonomy • Achieve financial self-sufficiency: Full Cost recovery +++ • Establish appropriate independent regulatory control • Develop Integrated Business Planning Models • Construct financial planning and control systems that define responsibilities and measure performance • Improve planning and operational performance via method changes, management development and broad-based training 5 PPP/PSP Options ä Public Autonomous Water / Wastewater Company ä Service Contracts ä Management Contracts ä Leases ä Concessions ä Build-Operate-Transfer Contracts (BOT) ä Full or Partial Divestiture 6 PPP / PSP Functional Activities • Institutional Reform • Business Planning • Financial Management Development • Financial Modeling and Tariff Development • Management Information Systems (MIS) • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) • Information Technology (IT) • Water Operations • Human Resources Development • Training and Management Development 7 All planning, goal setting, operations, tariff development, capital planning, financing are under the complete control of utility management. (...) Private Company is responsible for collection of operating revenues with additional financial risks transferred to the Private Sector • Utility leases specified assets (Right of Use) for operation and improvement • PSP profit depends on operating performance • Utility responsible for major capital, PSP for maintenance capit al • Define incentive conditions and responsibility assignments • Scope can be done under Joint Venture arrangement but with further complications in design and administration 35 PSP / PPP: CONCESSION AGREEMENT Concessions (15-30 years): Private Company both operates the system and is responsible for new investment for a period of time defined in the concession agreement. At the end of the contract, the concessionaire hands over the system and is paid the residual value of the existing assets. • Transfer of responsibility for new capital investment / extension to PC is an attractive component • Ownership remains with utility for initial assets with improvement assets reverting to utility at end of contract • Full responsibility of PC for operations and capital need entails incentives for efficiencies • Complex contract to include performance targets, arrangements for capital investment, tariff determination, and arrangements for arbitrating disputes • Regulation must be high quality to ensure equitable distribution of benefits to utility (lower prices, better service) and concessionaire (in profits). 36 PSP / PPP: BOT / BOO (Form of Concession) • Most often used for construction of new facilities • PSP/PPP operates and maintains facility for contract years relinquishing all rights at end of contract, often 10-30 years, renewable • Utility pays PSP/PPP for water produced / WW treated at a price that covers costs with guaranteed volume + reasonable return on investment • Can be modified into BOO where ownership remains with PSP; or DBO with shared capital responsibilities • Transfer-Operate-Transfer Back (TOT) variation can be little more than a disguised and expensive loan • BOLT (Build Operate Lease Transfer); DBFO (Design Build Finance Operate); DCMF (Design Construct Maintain Finance) 37 PSP / PPP: FULL/PARTIAL DIVESTITURE Asset Transfer (indefinite) – Tradesale or Flotation: A full asset transfer results in private ownership with full control over asset ownership, operation of existing assets and construction of new assets without any requirement for transferring back • PSP takes full ownership through purchase of assets or stock. • PSP has full responsibility for operations, maintenance, and investment requirements • Divestiture requires that regulators safeguard level of service, renovation, capacity for growth, fair pricing, and fair ROI • Partial divestiture can represent sale of shares to public (local or foreign), and management/employees who determine the efficiencies 38 APPENDIX 2 Institutional Strengthening 39 BUSINESS PLANNING • Encompasses Charter Authority/Agreement • Mission and Vision Statements • Goals and Objectives • Integration of all Functional Efforts 40 BUSINESS PLANNING • Forces Hard Decisions on Affordable Tasks • Inherent Budget Process Assigns: Ø Responsibilities by functional areas Ø Provides basis for control & performance measurement 41 BUDGETING • A formal structure for controlling costs & staffing • Assigns spending & control responsibilities to specific management • Establishes structured basis for spending performance evaluation & FIS reporting • Sound budgeting information required for proper tariff development • Budget becomes the core of the Business Plan 42 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT • Assess existing accounting systems relative to defined best practices • Assist in MIS selection of software and development of full computerized FIS • Assist in the design of modern budgeting system that includes capturing responsibility and performance by function and activity 43 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT • Prepare Manual of Policies, Procedures, and Financial regulations for selected activities • Review Billing & Collection System and recommend improvements • Prepare and conduct financial training program for different levels of financial and non-financial staff 44 FINANCIAL MODELING / TARIFFS • Develop Financial Model that works interactively with Budget Process to find an acceptable spending and tariff combination • Define the tariff requirements each year to meet: – Revenue requirements: operating, capital, profit – Planning tool to achieve full self-sufficiency 45 Essential Ingredients for Successful Modeling: • Accurate Water Demand Forecasts by customer group to define Sales Revenues • Accurate & high level of collections from billings • Accurate historical & projected level of spending for operations and capital • Regulatory support of required spending and tariff levels FINANCIAL MODELING / TARIFFS 46 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM THE MAJOR GOAL OF MIS IS TO: • TIE TOGETHER ALL MGT ACTIVITY • FOR ALL FUNCTIONAL ELEMENTS • INTO A COMPUTER BASED INFO SYSTEM • TO ENHANCE MGT DECISING MAKING & • IMPROVE OPERATING EFFICIENCIES 47 Financial: • Installation of computer accounting systems • Establish Local Area Networks (LANs) to link data • Design of a modern budgeting system • Computerized Billing & Collection system • Develop Financial Projection Models (each year) • Develop computerized water demand forecasting models essential to successful budgeting and planning • Measured domestic customer responses to price increases MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 48 Production Systems: • Water demand and supply analysis to ensure supply • Review of water monitoring system and design of improved Operations Monitoring Platform • Guidance document and analysis on identifying leaks and measuring unbilled water • Guidance document on method for planning and control of inventories MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 49 Human Resources Development: • HR database to include: Ø Employee employment & earnings history Ø Skills inventory, training achievements, aspirations Ø Job description with skill requirements to screen employees for best qualified candidates MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 50 Human Resources Development: • System generates payroll checks and links with accounting system • Designed system for building job description database • Designed system for summarizing staffing requirements by department, function, and activity, matching skills requirements MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 51 The goal for GIS is to develop a mapping and geographic system to support improved network operations and broad based Management Information System. 1.Get the basic GIS installed and working 2.Expand GIS outside the core GIS functions 3.Integrate GIS into everyday running of utility 4.Integrate GIS with all Utility MIS GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM 52 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Key goals for IT development: • Develop overall strategic plan for assessing and implementing hardware, software, and staffing required to meet the targeted MIS, GIS, and FIS systems developments • Advise on the selection (standardization, reliability) and procurement of specific computer hardware and software for CAD, GIS, FIS, EIS, LAN, WAN and internet needs 53 WATER SYSTEMS OPERATION Project Objectives: • Improve reliability and quality of water treatment and distribution: Ø Upgrade operational practices Ø Reduce quantities of unbilled water Ø Develop operational performance indicators Ø Improve maintenance and materials management programs 54 WATER SYSTEMS OPERATIONS Project Objectives: • Improve staffing and operating methods to increase efficiency and lower costs: Ø Provide guidance in operational standard setting and maintenance planning Ø Provide training and technical assistance for all key functions Ø Assess and recommend steps to provide safer working conditions 55 HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT • Review overall management organization to determine where changes would improve business performance • Assess needs and opportunities for HR practice improvements • Develop and implement HRD plans and work schedules to achieve agreed improvements • Develop and conduct workshops and other training according to priorities identified with utilities
Language:English
Score: 643085.55 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...p_asia/presentations/jenny.pdf
Data Source: un
CHULAMANEE CHARTSUWAN, AMBASSADOR AND DEPUTY PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE, CHARGE D' AFFAIRES, A.L OF THE KINGDOM OF THAILAND, ON AGENDA ITEM 136 : IMPROVING THE FINANCIAL SITUATION OFTHE UNITED NATIONS, AT THE SECOND RESUMED PART OF THE SEVENTIETH SESSION OF THE FIFTH COMMITTEE OF THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY (New York, 11 May 2016) Mr. (...) I have the honour to speak on behalf of the Group of 77 and China on agenda item 136 : Improving the financial situation of the United Nations. 2. (...) However, the Group remains positive that this situation will improve as it is recognised that not all Member States have national financial cycles aligned with that of the United Nations. 6.
Language:English
Score: 642683.9 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/fifth...land%20(G77%20and%20China).pdf
Data Source: un
The Board's reports have also contributed to better governance and more efficient financial and operational management of the UN. Madame Chair, We welcome the findings and recommendations of the Board on the financial position of the United Nations, as well as its financial performance and cash flows, as expressed in its latest report. (...) However, we note the Board's observation that the Administration is not yet making full use of the new platforms to support improved management decision-making and deliver the promised financial and service delivery improvements. In regards to business transformation, we concur with the Board on the need for a more harmonized approach to Organisation-wide business transformation and the need to establish an approach to managing and improving operations to enable continuous reform and improvements in departments.
Language:English
Score: 642005.1 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/fifth...0Auditors_European%20Union.pdf
Data Source: un
For many of the entities IPSAS implementation has to date largely been a technical exercise, although there is some evidence of more fundamental changes in underlying businesses processes. These improvements need to be embedded and processes for 2 producing financial information streamlined and enhanced to further improve the timeliness and quality of financial reporting. (...) For example, with some exceptions, the Board notes limited progress on the production of new management accounting data and in improving financial reporting for management so that it has regular and on-going in-year information on financial performance to aid timely decision making. (...) Entities must now use the financial information under IPSAS as a platform for improved accountability, control and financial sustainability, as well as more cost-effective decision making and delivery of vital services.
Language:English
Score: 641829.64 - https://www.un.org/en/auditors...ng%20statement%20-%20IPSAS.pdf
Data Source: un
The impact of liberalisation is seen in: - Stronger growth. - Greater efficiency and financial depth. - Support for business. - Improved access to capital. - The introduction of international standards. (...) The liberalisation of financial services has considerable potential to generate growth and improve services to business and the consumer. (...) This has been prompted by the desire of the authorities to improve the efficiency and stability of their financial systems and to help reduce the costs of restructuring and recapitalising troubled banks.
Language:English
Score: 641590.5 - https://www.wto.org/english/forums_e/ngo_e/ifsl.pdf
Data Source: un
It shall evaluate and contribute to the improvement of governance, risk management and control processes, and report thereon. (...) (Medium) 18 1912/UNDP Clustering Process 1 June 2018 Number of transactions per GSSU staff can be increased With the completion of the financial clustering in the Regional Bureau for Asia and the Pacific, the Bureau for Management Services should update its time-motion study to identify how it can improve staff utilization. (...) The Regional Bureau and the Office’s management accepted the residual risk. 2010/UNDP Yemen 4 January 2019 Weaknesses in financial oversight and controls over payments The Office should improve its financial oversight and control over payments of allowances by, on a sample basis, matching the staff names in the timesheets and in the UNDP pre-agreed list prior to making payments.
Language:English
Score: 640933.74 - https://www.undp.org/sites/g/f...session/dp2020-16_Annexes.docx
Data Source: un
None of the above responsibilities pose any financial risk to the Organization. On the contrary, the advisory role of providing guidance with regard to compliance with Financial Regulations and Rules reduces the financial risk to the Organization. 72. (...) Remedial measures may include counselling, transfer to more suitable functions, additional training and/or the institution of a time-bound performance improvement plan, which should include clear targets for improvement, provision for coaching and supervision by the first Case No. (...) Depriving the Applicant of her duties was a means of not allowing her to improve if improvement was an issue. Is the matter urgent?
Language:English
Score: 640785.8 - www.un.org/en/internalj...s/undt/orders/nbi-2014-255.pdf
Data Source: oaj
Nevertheless, Canada, like other members, would like to see specific financial means of implementation put forward. We believe a limited number of initiatives linked to each building block would make for a manageable agenda, one that demonstrates the determination of the international community to make improvements and also stands greater promise of being implemented. (...) Raise public revenue through improved tax administration: i. Strengthen tax administration, including through digitalisation ii. (...) Use new technologies to promote financial inclusion d. Protect consumers, regulate business conduct and improve financial literacy e.
Language:English
Score: 640528.27 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...ep-comments-Canada-Feb2015.pdf
Data Source: un