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Manner and particulars of registration 7. Statement to be signed by persons registering 8. (...) Penalty for 10. If any firm or person by this Act required to furnish a statement of default in registration particulars or of any change in particulars shall, without reasonable Excuse, have made default in so doing within the time specified in this Act, every partner in the firm or the person so in default shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding T$20 for every day during which the default continues, and the court shall order a statement of the required particulars or change in the particulars to be furnished to the Registrar within such time as may be specified in the court order. (...) Duty to furnish 13. (1) The Registrar may require any person to furnish him with such particulars particulars as appear necessary to the Registrar for the purpose of ascertaining whether or not he or the firm of which he is partner should be registered under this Act or an alteration made in the registered particulars, and may also, in the case of a corporation require the secretary or any other officer of a corporation performing the duties of secretary to furnish such particulars, and if any person when so required fails to supply such particulars as it is in his power to give or furnishes particulars which are false in any material particular, he shall, on conviction, be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months or to a fine not exceeding T$500 or to both such imprisonment and fine. (2) If from any information so furnished it appear to the Registrar that any firm or person ought to be registered under this Act, or an alteration ought to be made in the registered particulars the Registrar shall require the firm or person to furnish the required particulars within fourteen days.
Language:English
Score: 727168.4 - https://www.wto.org/english/th..._e/ton_e/WTACCTON4A3_LEG_5.pdf
Data Source: un
Causing Confusion with Respect to Another’s Enterprise or Activities Any deceptive act or practice in the course of trade that causes, or is likely to cause, confusion with respect to another person or his activities, in particular with regard to the products or services offered by such person, shall constitute an act of unfair competition. §2.3. (...) Misleading the Public (a) Any act or practice in the course of trade that intentionally misleads, or is likely to mislead, the public with respect to a person or his activities, in particular, the products or services offered by such person, shall constitute an act of unfair competition. (...) Discrediting Another’s Enterprise or its Activities (a) Any false or unjustified allegation in the course of trade that discredits, or is likely to discredit, another person or his activities, in particular, the products or services offered by such person, shall constitute an act of unfair competition.
Language:English
Score: 697919.63 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...c_e/lbr_e/WTACCLBR10_LEG_8.pdf
Data Source: un
Inclusion of geriatrics and gerontology in university and nursing training programmes; Recommendations on Care - Adopt measures that improve access to palliative care, in order to allow all older persons with terminal illnesses to avoid unnecessary suffering and die with dignity; - Improve existing preferential measures that facilitate access to medicines, equipment, assistive devices and comprehensive rehabilitation services, in particular in rural, coastal and remote areas; - Put additional efforts into providing human-rights training for formal and informal caregivers, and to inform older persons about their human rights in care settings, including their right to privacy and intimacy; - Continue implementing specific programmes to address the situation of older persons with HIV/AIDS, and those suffering from communicable and non-communicable diseases; as well as to address emerging diseases, including chikungunya, dengue, and zika; including training for care providers and health professionals, and facilitating access to prevention, treatment and rehabilitation mechanisms; - Pay particular attention to the situation of older persons with chronic degenerative diseases, Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia; - Pay particular attention to the situation of certain groups of older persons, including those living on the streets, in rural, coastal and remote areas, those belonging to ethnic, linguistic or religious minorities, LGBTI older persons, and those deprived of their liberty. (...) Particular attention should be given to older women, those with disabilities, those living alone and in need of care, those living on the streets, LGBTI older persons, and the age group of nonagenarians and centenarians, that could be at greatest risk of being abused; - Adopt or amend existing legal/policy/regulatory frameworks to prevent, investigate, punish and eradicate abuse, abandonment, negligence, and all forms of violence against older persons. (...) Recommendations on Education, training, lifelong learning and capacity-building - Increase investment in education and adopt specific programmes to reduce illiteracy among older persons, with particular attention to older women, and those living in rural and remote areas; - Promote access for older persons to education and training programmes, including the creation of third age universities and other institutional programmes, which will reinforce intergenerational interactions and dialogues, with particular focus on numeracy, information and new technology, communication, and computing skills; - Promote the incorporation of the issue of ageing and old age in curricula at all levels of the education systems and promote intergenerational interactions in schools; - Develop accessible and age-friendly formatted information and educational programs, and materials that consider the needs and challenges faced by older persons, in particular those with disabilities.
Language:English
Score: 697395.9 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...d_plan_of_action_on_ageing.pdf
Data Source: un
“geographical indication”, in relation to goods originating in a particular country or in a region or locality of that country, means a sign recognised in that country as a sign indicating that the goods: (a) originated in that country, region or locality; and (b) have a quality, reputation or other characteristic attributable to their geographical origin; 8 “goods of a person” means goods dealt with or provided in the course of trade by the person; “indigenous knowledge” means any knowledge: (a) that is created, acquired or inspired for traditional economic, spiritual, ritual, narrative, decorative or recreational purposes; and (b) whose nature or use has been transmitted from generation to generation; and (c) that is regarded as pertaining to a particular indigenous person or people in Vanuatu; “limitations” means limitations on the exclusive right to use a trademark given by the registration of the trademark, including limitations on: (a) mode of use; or (b) use within a territorial area in Vanuatu; or (c) use for goods or services to be exported; “old Act” means the Registration of United Kingdom Trademarks Act [Cap 81]; “opponent”, for the registration of a trademark, means: (a) the person who has filed (under section 30) a notice of opposition to the registration of the trademark; or (b) the person in whose name the notice of opposition is taken to have been filed; “originate”, for or in relation to wine, has the meaning given by section 8; “pending”, for an application for the registration of a trademark, includes the period in which an appeal may be made from a decision on the application; “person” includes a body of persons, whether incorporated or not; 9 “predecessor in title”, for a person who claims to be the owner of a trademark, means: (a) if the trademark was assigned or transmitted to one or more than one other person before it was assigned or transmitted to the first-mentioned person—that other person or any one of those other persons; or (b) if paragraph (a) does not apply—the person who assigned the trademark, or from whom the trademark was transmitted, to the first-mentioned person;. (...) The Registrar must enter these particulars in the Register. (2) The Registrar must also enter in the Register: (a) a graphical representation of the trademark; and (b) its registration number; and (c) any other particulars that are required by this Act to be entered in the Register. 30 (3) If two or more persons applied together for the registration of the trademark (see section 17), the applicants must be registered as joint owners of the trademark. (...) RENEWAL WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER REGISTRATION EXPIRES 51. (1) If, within 3 months after the registration of a trademark has expired, a person asks the Registrar to renew the registration of the trademark, the Registrar must renew the registration of the trademark for 10 years from the day on which the registration expired. (2) The request must be in the approved form and be filed with the Registrar. 33 PART 7—AMENDMENT AND CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION CORRECTION OF REGISTER 52. (1) The Registrar may, on his or her own initiative, correct any error or omission made in entering in the Register any particular in respect of the registration of a trademark. (2) The Court may, on the application of an aggrieved person, order that the Register be rectified by: (a) entering in the Register particulars that were wrongly omitted from it; or (b) correcting an error in an entry in the Register. (3) When the Registrar amends any information entered in the Register about a trademark, the Registrar may also amend the certificate of registration if it is necessary to ensure it reflects the information in the Register.
Language:English
Score: 692398.34 - https://www.wto.org/english/th..._e/vut_e/WTACCVUT14_LEG_33.pdf
Data Source: un
“geographical indication”, in relation to goods originating in a particular country or in a region or locality of that country, means a sign recognised in that country as a sign indicating that the goods: (a) originated in that country, region or locality; and (b) have a quality, reputation or other characteristic attributable to their geographical origin; 8 “goods of a person” means goods dealt with or provided in the course of trade by the person; “indigenous knowledge” means any knowledge: (a) that is created, acquired or inspired for traditional economic, spiritual, ritual, narrative, decorative or recreational purposes; and (b) whose nature or use has been transmitted from generation to generation; and (c) that is regarded as pertaining to a particular indigenous person or people in Vanuatu; “limitations” means limitations on the exclusive right to use a trademark given by the registration of the trademark, including limitations on: (a) mode of use; or (b) use within a territorial area in Vanuatu; or (c) use for goods or services to be exported; “National Cultural Council” means the Vanuatu National Cultural Council established by the Vanuatu National Cultural Council Act [CAP 186]; “old Act” means the Registration of United Kingdom Trademarks Act [Cap 81]; “opponent”, for the registration of a trademark, means: (a) the person who has filed (under section 30) a notice of opposition to the registration of the trademark; or (b) the person in whose name the notice of opposition is taken to have been filed; “originate”, for or in relation to wine, has the meaning given by section 8; “pending”, for an application for the registration of a trademark, includes the period in which an appeal may be made from a decision on the application; “person” includes a body of persons, whether incorporated or not; 9 “predecessor in title”, for a person who claims to be the owner of a trademark, means: (a) if the trademark was assigned or transmitted to one or more than one other person before it was assigned or transmitted to the first-mentioned person—that other person or any one of those other persons; or (b) if paragraph (a) does not apply—the person who assigned the trademark, or from whom the trademark was transmitted, to the first-mentioned person;. (...) The Registrar must enter these particulars in the Register. (2) The Registrar must also enter in the Register: (a) a graphical representation of the trademark; and (b) its registration number; and (c) any other particulars that are required by this Act to be entered in the Register. 31 (3) If two or more persons applied together for the registration of the trademark (see section 17), the applicants must be registered as joint owners of the trademark. (...) RENEWAL WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER REGISTRATION EXPIRES 51. (1) If, within 3 months after the registration of a trademark has expired, a person asks the Registrar to renew the registration of the trademark, the Registrar must renew the registration of the trademark for 10 years from the day on which the registration expired. (2) The request must be in the approved form and be filed with the Registrar. 34 PART 7—AMENDMENT AND CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION CORRECTION OF REGISTER 52. (1) The Registrar may, on his or her own initiative, correct any error or omission made in entering in the Register any particular in respect of the registration of a trademark. (2) The Court may, on the application of an aggrieved person, order that the Register be rectified by: (a) entering in the Register particulars that were wrongly omitted from it; or (b) correcting an error in an entry in the Register. (3) When the Registrar amends any information entered in the Register about a trademark, the Registrar may also amend the certificate of registration if it is necessary to ensure it reflects the information in the Register.
Language:English
Score: 692398.34 - https://www.wto.org/english/th.../vut_e/WTACCVUT9A6_LEG_12A.pdf
Data Source: un
The Registrar must enter these particulars in the Register. (2) The Registrar must also enter in the Register: (a) a graphical representation of the trademark; and (b) its registration number; and (c) any other particulars that are required by this Act to be entered in the Register. (3) If two or more persons applied together for the registration of the trademark (see section 17), the applicants must be registered as joint owners of the trademark. (...) OF TRADEMARK WHOSE REGISTRATION IS SOUGHT 67. (1) If a trademark whose registration is being sought is assigned or transmitted: (a) the applicant for the registration of the trademark; or (b) the person to whom it has been assigned or transmitted; must apply to the Registrar for the assignment or transmission to be recorded. (2) The application must be in an approved form and be filed with the Registrar. (3) If the application complies with this Act, the Registrar must: (a) within 3 working days of receiving the application, record, in the papers dealing with the application for registration, the particulars of the assignment or transmission; and (b) publish the particulars of the assignment or transmission in the Gazette. (4) On and after the day on which the Registrar records the particulars of the assignment or transmission, the person to whom the trademark has been assigned or transmitted is taken, for the purposes of this Act, to be the applicant for the registration of the trademark. (...) If an application for the assignment or transmission of a trademark complies with this Act, the Registrar must notify in writing any person recorded under Part 10 as claiming an interest in, or a right in respect of, the trademark. 29 PART 10—VOLUNTARY RECORDING OF CLAIMS TO INTERESTS IN TRADEMARKS RECORDING CLAIMS TO INTEREST ETC. - REGISTERED TRADEMARKS 70. (1) If: (a) a person (other than the registered owner of the trademark) claims to have an interest in, or a right to, a registered trademark; and (b) this interest or right may not be recorded in the Register under Part 9; the person and the registered owner of the trademark may together apply to the Registrar to have particulars of the claim recorded in the Register. (2) The application must be in the approved form and must be filed with the Registrar. (3) If the application has been made in accordance with this section, the Registrar must enter in the Register the particulars of the claim set out in the application. (4) If: (a) a trademark is registered; and (b) immediately before the registration, particulars of a claim to an interest in, or right to, the unregistered trademark were recorded under section 72; the Registrar must enter those particulars in the Register.
Language:English
Score: 691666.85 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...cc_e/vut_e/WTACCVUT9_LEG_3.pdf
Data Source: un
The priority date for the registration of a design for a particular article is: (a) if the design is registered—the date of registration of the design for that article; or (b) if the registration of the design is being sought—the day that would be the date of registration of the design for the article if the design were registered. 10 PART 2—DESIGNS AND DESIGN RIGHTS OWNERSHIP OF UNREGISTERED DESIGN 5. (1) This section deals with unregistered designs. (2) Subject to this section, the author of an unregistered design is the owner of the design. (3) If a person or the person’s employee makes a design for another person, that other person is the owner of the design. (4) In spite of subsection (3), if a design is made by a person in the course of his or her employment, the employer is the owner of the design. (5) The owner of a design or the assignee of an interest in a design may assign to another person the whole or any part of his or her interest in the design. (...) The Registrar must enter these particulars in the Register. (2) The Registrar must also enter in the Register: (a) a representation of the design; and (b) its registration number; and (c) any other particulars that are required by this Act to be entered in the Register. (3) If two or more persons applied together for the registration of the design, the applicants must be registered as joint owners of the design. (...) RECORDING CLAIMS TO INTEREST—REGISTERED DESIGNS 56. (1) If: (a) a person has applied for the registration of a design; and 35 (b) another person claims to have an interest in, or a right to, the design; they may together apply to the Registrar for a record to be kept of the other person’s claim. (2) If a person (other than the registered owner of a design) claims to have an interest in, or a right to, a registered design, the person and the registered owner of the design may together apply to the Registrar to have particulars of the claim recorded in the Register. (3) The application must be in the approved form and must be filed with the Registrar. (4) If the application has been made in accordance with this section, the Registrar must: (a) for a registered design—enter in the Register the particulars of the claim set out in the application; and (b) for an unregistered design—record, in the papers dealing with the application for registration, the particulars of the claim set out in the application. (5) After a design is registered, the Registrar must enter the particulars of the claim to an interest in, or right to, the unregistered design in the Register.
Language:English
Score: 685603.27 - https://www.wto.org/english/th..._e/vut_e/WTACCVUT14_LEG_31.pdf
Data Source: un
The priority date for the registration of a design for a particular article is: (a) if the design is registered—the date of registration of the design for that article; or (b) if the registration of the design is being sought—the day that would be the date of registration of the design for the article if the design were registered. 10 PART 2—DESIGNS AND DESIGN RIGHTS OWNERSHIP OF UNREGISTERED DESIGN 5. (1) This section deals with unregistered designs. (2) Subject to this section, the author of an unregistered design is the owner of the design. (3) If a person or the person’s employee makes a design for another person, that other person is the owner of the design. (4) In spite of subsection (3), if a design is made by a person in the course of his or her employment, the employer is the owner of the design. (5) The owner of a design or the assignee of an interest in a design may assign to another person the whole or any part of his or her interest in the design. (...) The Registrar must enter these particulars in the Register. (2) The Registrar must also enter in the Register: (a) a representation of the design; and (b) its registration number; and (c) any other particulars that are required by this Act to be entered in the Register. (3) If two or more persons applied together for the registration of the design, the applicants must be registered as joint owners of the design. (...) RECORDING CLAIMS TO INTEREST—REGISTERED DESIGNS 56. (1) If: (a) a person has applied for the registration of a design; and 34 (b) another person claims to have an interest in, or a right to, the design; they may together apply to the Registrar for a record to be kept of the other person’s claim. (2) If a person (other than the registered owner of a design) claims to have an interest in, or a right to, a registered design, the person and the registered owner of the design may together apply to the Registrar to have particulars of the claim recorded in the Register. (3) The application must be in the approved form and must be filed with the Registrar. (4) If the application has been made in accordance with this section, the Registrar must: (a) for a registered design—enter in the Register the particulars of the claim set out in the application; and (b) for an unregistered design—record, in the papers dealing with the application for registration, the particulars of the claim set out in the application. (5) After a design is registered, the Registrar must enter the particulars of the claim to an interest in, or right to, the unregistered design in the Register.
Language:English
Score: 685603.27 - https://www.wto.org/english/th.../vut_e/WTACCVUT9A6_LEG_11A.pdf
Data Source: un
Other measures taken in response to COVID-19, such as self-isolation, need to take into account the particular situation of persons with disabilities, including that some may need personal assistance.  2) Ensure communication is accessible and disability-inclusive All public health, education and work- related communication on COVID-19, including on telework arrangements, must be accessible to persons with disabilities, including through the use of sign language, subtitles and accessible websites. Communication should also address the particular situation of persons with disabilities.  3) Provide adequate social protection Social protection is essential for persons with disabilities to cover the extra costs related to disability, which may increase due to the impact of the crisis and lead to a disruption of their support system. (...) For this to happen, the application of international labour standards and other human rights instruments, in particular the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, is essential.  5) Change the narrative Fundamental to all these points is including persons with disabilities as co-creators of COVID-19 responses, as champions and users, not as victims.
Language:English
Score: 684859.03 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_741287.pdf
Data Source: un
In the experience of the Court, and its Detention Centre in particular, the facilitation of family visits for indigent detained persons through the TFFV has played a critical role in promoting psychosocial well-being. (...) Visits offset social isolation and have a humanising effect on the detained person. Visits also improve familial relationships, with particular benefits for the psychosocial development of the children of detained persons. (...) It accounts for eight separate visits, involving 24 family members, benefiting three indigent detained persons. The amount of funding required varies each year, depending on how many indigent persons are in ICC custody, and the particular circumstances and needs of their respective families.
Language:English
Score: 680898.3 - https://www.icc-cpi.int/sites/...ons/20190919-tffvisits-eng.pdf
Data Source: un