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Etpu MECHANISM FOR ADDRESSING COMPLAINTS REGARDING ALLEGED MISCONDUCT OR INCAPACITY OF THE JUDGES OF THE UNITED NATIONS DISPUTE TRIBUNAL AND THE UNITED NATIONS APPEALS TRIBUNAL 1. Allegations regarding misconduct or incapacity of a judge should be made, in writing, directly to the President of the relevant Tribunal. (...) A complaint shall not be receivable unless it is received within 60 days of the date on which the alleged misconduct or incapacity took place, except as set out in paragraph 4 below. 4.
Language:English
Score: 1247239 - https://www.un.org/en/internal...ustice/pdfs/Mechanism_(EN).pdf
Data Source: un
Etpu MECHANISM FOR ADDRESSING COMPLAINTS REGARDING ALLEGED MISCONDUCT OR INCAPACITY OF THE JUDGES OF THE UNITED NATIONS DISPUTE TRIBUNAL AND THE UNITED NATIONS APPEALS TRIBUNAL 1. Allegations regarding misconduct or incapacity of a judge should be made, in writing, directly to the President of the relevant Tribunal. (...) A complaint shall not be receivable unless it is received within 60 days of the date on which the alleged misconduct or incapacity took place, except as set out in paragraph 4 below. 4.
Language:English
Score: 1247239 - https://www.un.org/es/internal...ustice/pdfs/Mechanism_(EN).pdf
Data Source: un
However, in order to ensure rotation of the Chairmanship, no Member shall serve as Chairman for more than two consecutive terms. (3) The Chairman shall be responsible for the overall direction of the Appellate Body business, and in particular, his/her responsibilities shall include: (a) the supervision of the internal functioning of the Appellate Body; and (b) any such other duties as the Members may agree to entrust to him/her. (4) Where the office of the Chairman becomes vacant due to permanent incapacity as a result of illness or death or by resignation or expiration of his/her term, the Members shall elect a new Chairman who shall serve a full term in accordance with paragraph 2. (5) In the event of a temporary absence or incapacity of the Chairman, the Appellate Body shall authorize another Member to act as Chairman ad interim, and the Member so authorized shall temporarily exercise all the powers, duties and functions of the Chairman until the Chairman is capable of resuming his/her functions. 1.2 2002 Amendment of Rule 5(2) 1.
Language:English
Score: 1077124.6 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...ons_e/ai17_e/wpar_rul5_oth.pdf
Data Source: un
Regardless of the origin, financial and socio-economic crises feature combinations of adverse conditions: lack of access to financing/credit, slump in investments, household demand and consumption, a falling GDP, high deficits and debt ratios, loss of income, unemployment, shrinkage of state provisions, poverty, enforced migration, homelessness, and an incapacity to satisfy basic needs. These translate into losses for collective and private agencies in the crisis community. (...) DRs such as drought, desertification, and famine may trigger market speculation on scarce resources, rising prices, a decline of dependent economic sectors, a fall of GDP and income, an incapacity to satisfy basic needs, a disruption of social cohesion, and even armed conflicts.
Language:English
Score: 966528 - https://www.undrr.org/publicat...r-risks-examples-developed-and
Data Source: un
The proposed definitions of incapacity to work, and permanent and temporary incapacity to work, were the subject of a number of comments. It was generally felt that incapacity for work should be defined as in the code of practice. (...) A number of modifications were put forward to the proposed classification of the consequences of injuries : deletion of the categories "temporary incapacity to work" and "less than one day lost", and separation of the proposed group "permanent incapacity to work or 183 days or more lost" into "more than six months lost and up to one year" and "permanent incapacity to work".
Language:English
Score: 963100.8 - www.ilo.org/public/engl...ds/relm/gb/docs/gb272/gb-3.htm
Data Source: un
The proposed definitions of incapacity to work, and permanent and temporary incapacity to work, were the subject of a number of comments. It was generally felt that incapacity for work should be defined as in the code of practice. (...) A number of modifications were put forward to the proposed classification of the consequences of injuries : deletion of the categories "temporary incapacity to work" and "less than one day lost", and separation of the proposed group "permanent incapacity to work or 183 days or more lost" into "more than six months lost and up to one year" and "permanent incapacity to work".
Language:English
Score: 963100.8 - https://www.ilo.org/public/eng...ds/relm/gb/docs/gb272/gb-3.htm
Data Source: un
.- The provisions of this decree apply to persons with disabilities holding a National Disability Card and justifying a Permanent Potential Incapacity Rate (IPP) of at least fifty percent (50%). (...) ARTICLE 27.- (1) The disability allowance provided for in Article 26 above shall be granted to indigent persons with disabilities whose Permanent Impairment Incapacity rate is at least ninety-five (95) percent and whose state of health requires constant medical supervision and care based on the expert report of a specialist physician. (2) The indigence mentioned in paragraph 1 above is established based on a social survey conducted by the relevant departments of the Ministry of Social Affairs. (3) The allocation of the invalidity allowance to the disabled person is subject to: - the non-perception of any public support for installation or self-employment purposes; - the non-enjoyment of social benefits in respect of occupational risks, old-age or invalidity pension, or any other form of life pension; - the absence of any preferential measures for employment granted by the public authorities; - the non-enjoyment of a monthly salary equivalent to at least the Guaranteed Minimum Interprofessional Salary (SMIG). (4) Amounts and methods of granting the invalidity allowance are set by joint order of the Ministers for Social Affairs and Finance. ARTICLE 28.- The medical care of indigent disabled persons consists of the reduction or exemption of fees, in proportion to their Permanent Potential Incapacity (PPI) rate for: - Consultation; - laboratory examinations; - radiography or medical imaging; - hospitalization; - medical evacuation; - purchase of certain medicines, in specialized institutions and public or private health facilities, ARTICLE 29.- (1) The State subsidizes certain products and materials intended for the treatment of specific pathologies or functional rehabilitation. (2) The list of products and materials provided for in paragraph 1 above is laid down in a special joint text of the Ministers for Social Affairs and Health. (3) Public and private institutions of functional rehabilitation and medical rehabilitation of persons with disabilities may be eligible for grants whose conditions and procedures are fixed by a specific text of the Minister of Finance, after consulting the Ministers in charge of Social Affairs and Health.
Language:English
Score: 947756.6 - https://www.un.org/development...N-2010-LAW-ENGLISH-VERSION.pdf
Data Source: un
COMMUNICATION NO. 36/2012 : COMMITTEE ON THE ELIMINATION OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN : VIEWS ADOPTED BY THE COMMITTEE AT ITS 57TH SESSION, 10-28 FEBRUARY 2014
De Blok took out private incapacity insurance that provided for maternity allowance. (...) Spreij inquired as to the cost of private incapacity insurance after media reports regarding the Discontinuation of Access to Incapacity Insurance (Self-employed Persons) Act. (...) Until 31 July 2004, self-employed persons were compulsorily insured against the risk of loss of income as a result of incapacity for work under the Incapacity Insurance (Self-employed Persons) Act.
Language:English
Score: 943683.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...DS=CEDAW/C/57/D/36/2012&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
(Income US$2004) 1,425 1,520 3,580 4,408 8,912 10,289 6,587 4,947 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 FIJI TONGA Less than required Same as required More than required Total Country Fiji: Income and Remittances (US$ 2004) 312 753 1,891 467 244 244 488 228 265 Less than required Same as required More than required Average Income All Remittances Cash Remittances 291 727 1,844 616 358 540527 286 432 Less than required Same as required More than required Average Income All Remittances Cash Remittances Tonga: Income and Remittances (US$ 2004) Remittance Motivations Figure 2 Predicted Transfers and the Subjective Income Gap : Tonga Source: Brown and Jimenez (2008b) 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 -10000 0 10000 20000 30000 Household Subjective Income Gap(US$) P r e d i c t e d T r a n s f e r s ($) Motivations: Regression Results Principal Motivations to RemitPrincipal Motivations to Remit Altruism: $100 decrease in subjective income gap leads to Altruism: $100 decrease in subjective income gap leads to $47$47--$30 remittances increase in Tonga and $8$30 remittances increase in Tonga and $8--$9 in Fiji $9 in Fiji Exchange: $100 increase in subjective income gap leads to Exchange: $100 increase in subjective income gap leads to $11$11--$6 remittances increase in Tonga and $1 in Fiji$6 remittances increase in Tonga and $1 in Fiji Other significant motivators:Other significant motivators: Presence old person increased remittances by U$562 in Presence old person increased remittances by U$562 in Tonga, but not in Fiji Tonga, but not in Fiji Major social ceremony increased remittances by $1518 in Major social ceremony increased remittances by $1518 in Tonga and $354 in Fiji Tonga and $354 in Fiji The number of HHM with medical incapacity for more than The number of HHM with medical incapacity for more than 30 days increased remittances ($300) in Tonga, but had not 30 days increased remittances ($300) in Tonga, but had not significant effect in Fijisignificant effect in Fiji Motivations: Regression Results Remittances by Numbers of Sick in HH Remittances by # of Sick HHM 521 2,429 697 2,680 347 5,302 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Fiji Tonga U $ R em itt an ce s No sick HHM 1 sick HHM >= 2 sick HHM Remittances and Major Social Ceremonies 475 2,533 1,308 5,265 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Fiji Tonga U $ R em itt an ce s No Wedding/Funeral Had Wedding/Funeral Uses and Effects of Remittances • How are remittances used? (...) Number of days during the survey year was recordedNumber of days during the survey year was recorded Identified those with more than 30 days of incapacity. Identified those with more than 30 days of incapacity.
Language:English
Score: 940741.6 - https://www.un.org/development...ation_brown_remitt_and_dev.pdf
Data Source: un
Employment injury benefit Convention No. 102 - [ ratifications ]: medical care, periodical payments corresponding to at least 50% of the reference wage in cases of incapacity for work or invalidity. Benefits for widow and dependent children in case of death of breadwinner with periodical payments corresponding to at least 40% of the reference wage. (...) Except in the case of incapacity for work, obligation to revise the rates of periodical payments following substantial changes in the cost of living. (...) Periodical payments, corresponding to at least 60% of the reference wage in cases of incapacity for work or invalidity, benefits for widow, the disabled and dependent widower, and dependent children in case of death of breadwinner, with periodical payments corresponding to at least 50% of the reference wage.
Language:English
Score: 936673.6 - https://www.ilo.org/global/sta...al-security/lang--ja/index.htm
Data Source: un