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Expenditure reduced by 20% where employee has been fired, an MSME went bankrupt or an individual was unemployed. 3. (...) Expenditure reduced by 40% where employee has been fired, an MSME went bankrupt or an individual was unemployed. 3. (...) Expenditure reduced by 60% where employee has been fired, an MSME went bankrupt or an individual was unemployed. 3.
Language:English
Score: 873932.8 - https://www.unicef.org/uganda/...da_covid-19_Modelling-2021.pdf
Data Source: un
 Page 502 - Shaping smarter and more sustainable cities - Striving for sustainable development goals           Basic HTML Version Table of Contents View Full Version Page 502 - Shaping smarter and more sustainable cities - Striving for sustainable development goals P. 502 8 Conclusions Intelligent buildings are becoming more common, more complex and provide the ability for significantly reducing the environmental impact of our built infrastructure. 8.1 Vision The ultimate vision of an intelligent building is one in which a very small group of individuals can monitor, manage, diagnose (and sometimes correct) most building operational issues without ever leaving their desks which are equipped with little more than a computer screen. (...) The economies of reduced staffing, immediate response and operational statistics are significant. (...) The ability to use electronic controls which ensure smooth starting and stopping of all machines, the gradual activation of luminaires and the smooth shutdown of luminaires all lead to significantly reduced operational failures and significantly extended operational life thereby providing further economies. 8.2 Future Considerations Key areas that need to be addressed to gain the full benefit of intelligent building include:  Understanding the goal of design and operation of an intelligent building.  Is it more important that the building be more efficient, i.e. that the operating costs are reduced?
Language:English
Score: 845999.4 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page502.html
Data Source: un
The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas. The usage of scrap tyres, unused pet bottles, plastics etc can reduce the losses due to evaporation and ensure that water availability for a longer time and thus reduces crop losses during drought expand to read more read on a separate page Access your account Lost password?
Language:English
Score: 842283.2 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/comment/7843
Data Source: un
The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas. The usage of scrap tyres, unused pet bottles, plastics etc can reduce the losses due to evaporation and ensure that water availability for a longer time and thus reduces crop losses during drought expand to read more read on a separate page Access your account Lost password?
Language:English
Score: 842283.2 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/comment/7843
Data Source: un
Nutrition among the individuals is significantly affected by the following factors: (a) Availability of nutritious food to the individuals (b) Cost of nutritious food in individuals (c) Awareness on nutritious food to the individuals (d) Identification of nutrition levels in communities and individuals (a) Availability & cost of nutritious food to the individuals In urban context availability and cost of the nutritious food is an issue because many people cant afford it. (...) The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas.
Language:English
Score: 842283.2 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/ar/comment/7843
Data Source: un
Nutrition among the individuals is significantly affected by the following factors: (a) Availability of nutritious food to the individuals (b) Cost of nutritious food in individuals (c) Awareness on nutritious food to the individuals (d) Identification of nutrition levels in communities and individuals (a) Availability & cost of nutritious food to the individuals In urban context availability and cost of the nutritious food is an issue because many people cant afford it. (...) The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas.
Language:English
Score: 842283.2 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ar/comment/7843
Data Source: un
Anaemia Assessment for nutrition-related disorders in women during pregnancy Daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy Daily iron supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Daily iron supplementation in children 24–59 months of age Daily iron supplementation in children 24–59 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children 6-23 months of age Daily iron supplementation in children 6-23 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age Daily iron supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age in malaria-endemic areas Deworming in children Deworming in non-pregnant adolescent girls and women of reproductive age Deworming in pregnant women Fortification of maize flour and corn meal Fortification of wheat flour Insecticide-treated nets to reduce the risk of malaria in pregnant women Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron supplementation in preschool and school-age children Intermittent iron supplementation in preschool and school-age children in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent preventative treatment to reduce the risk of malaria during pregnancy Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia in malaria-endemic areas Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by children 2–12 years of age Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by children 6–23 months of age Optimal timing of cord clamping for the prevention of iron deficiency anaemia in infants Use of ferritin concentrations to assess iron status in individuals and populations Diarrhoea Deworming in children Deworming in non-pregnant adolescent girls and women of reproductive age Deworming in pregnant women Therapeutic feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition and acute or persistent diarrhoea Water, sanitation and hygiene interventions to prevent diarrhoea Zinc supplementation in the management of diarrhoea Ebola virus disease Nutritional care of children and adults with Ebola virus disease in treatment centres HIV/AIDS Infant feeding for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV Macronutrient supplementation in people living with HIV/AIDS Management of HIV-infected children under 5 years of age with severe acute malnutrition Micronutrient supplementation in HIV-infected women during pregnancy Nutrition counselling for adolescents and adults with HIV/AIDS Nutritional care of HIV-infected children Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected adults Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected infants and children 6–59 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected women during pregnancy Malaria Daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children 24–59 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children 6-23 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age in malaria-endemic areas Insecticide-treated nets to reduce the risk of malaria in pregnant women Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron supplementation in preschool and school-age children in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent preventative treatment to reduce the risk of malaria during pregnancy Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia in malaria-endemic areas Noncommunicable diseases Cancer Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Cardiovascular diseases Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Increasing potassium intake to control blood pressure in children Increasing potassium intake to reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults Reducing sodium intake to control blood pressure in children Reducing sodium intake to reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults Diabetes Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Obesity Exclusive breastfeeding to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Limiting portion sizes to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of unhealthy weight gain in adults Reducing free sugars intake in adults to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Reducing free sugars intake in children to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Reducing the impact of marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages on children Respiratory conditions Use of antibiotics in the outpatient management of children 6-59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Vitamin A supplementation in children with respiratory infections Vitamin D supplementation and respiratory infections in children Zinc supplementation in children with respiratory infections Tuberculosis Management of moderate undernutrition in individuals with active tuberculosis Management of severe acute malnutrition in individuals with active tuberculosis Micronutrient supplementation in individuals with active tuberculosis Nutrition assessment and counselling in individuals with active tuberculosis Undernutrition Moderate acute malnutrition Management of moderate undernutrition in individuals with active tuberculosis Supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged 6–59 months Severe acute malnutrition Fluid management in severely malnourished children under 5 years of age with shock Fluid management in severely malnourished children under 5 years of age without shock Identification of severe acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months of age Identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants under 6 months of age Identification of severe acute malnutrition requiring inpatient care in children 6–59 months of age Management of HIV-infected children under 5 years of age with severe acute malnutrition Management of infants under 6 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Management of severe acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months of age with oedema Management of severe acute malnutrition in individuals with active tuberculosis Micronutrient intake in children with severe acute malnutrition Therapeutic feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition and acute or persistent diarrhoea Transition feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Treatment of hypoglycaemia in children with severe acute malnutrition Treatment of hypothermia in children with severe acute malnutrition Use of antibiotics in the outpatient management of children 6-59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Vitamin A supplementation in children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Other Supplementary feeding in community settings for promoting child growth Zika virus disease Infant feeding in areas of Zika virus transmission Contact us eLENA team Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD) World Health Organization 20 Avenue Appia CH-1211 Geneva 27 Switzerland E-mail: [email protected] WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development You are here: e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA) Health conditions Regions Africa Americas Eastern Mediterranean Europe South-East Asia Western Pacific About us Careers Library Procurement Publications Frequently asked questions Contact us Subscribe to our newsletters Privacy Legal Notice © 2022 WHO
Language:English
Score: 841710.9 - https://www.who.int/elena/health_condition/en/
Data Source: un
The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas. The usage of scrap tyres, unused pet bottles, plastics etc can reduce the losses due to evaporation and ensure that water availability for a longer time and thus reduces crop losses during drought развернуть, чтобы читать далее читать на отдельной странице Доступ к вашей учетной записи Забыли пароль?
Language:English
Score: 837505.4 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ru/comment/7843
Data Source: un
The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas. The usage of scrap tyres, unused pet bottles, plastics etc can reduce the losses due to evaporation and ensure that water availability for a longer time and thus reduces crop losses during drought Tout afficher Afficher sur une page séparée Accédez à votre compte Mot de passe égaré?
Language:English
Score: 837505.4 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/fr/comment/7843
Data Source: un
The main reason is that there are no barriers to reduce the speed of the winds which flow through the farms. Since farmers cannot invest in taking measures for growing plant species to tackle wind speeds, the corporates should be allowed to fund the farmers to grow the species which reduces the wind speeds. Urban waste as a source to reduce evaporation Many sources in urban areas may be effectively used to reduce evaporation from the tanks in rural areas. The usage of scrap tyres, unused pet bottles, plastics etc can reduce the losses due to evaporation and ensure that water availability for a longer time and thus reduces crop losses during drought ampliar para leer más leer en una página separada Acceda a su cuenta ¿Olvidó la contraseña?
Language:English
Score: 837505.4 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/es/comment/7843
Data Source: un