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Vaccine manufacturing 1.3 Other ingredients Formaldehyde Inactivating ingredients - to kill viruses or inactivate toxins 291211 OECD, WCO 34 1. (...) Vaccine manufacturing 1.3 Other ingredients Monobasic potassium phosphate 283524 Assumed pure. (...) Vaccine manufacturing 1.3 Other ingredients Emulsifiers Emulsification - To help the water and oil based ingredients stay together More information is needed for classification ADB 40 1.
Language:English
Score: 1012168.8 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr..._e/vaccine_inputs_report_e.pdf
Data Source: un
(b) Where an ingredient of the foodstuff is itself the product of several ingredients, the latter shall be regarded as ingredients of the foodstuff in question. (...) The quantity indicated, expressed as a percentage, shall correspond to the quantity of the ingredient or ingredients at the time of its/their use. (...) The indication referred to in paragraph 1 shall appear either in or immediately next to the name under which the foodstuff is sold or in the list of ingredients in connection with the ingredient or category of ingredients in question. 6.
Language:English
Score: 1004422.4 - https://www.fao.org/uploads/media/EU_2000_13_EC.pdf
Data Source: un
Vaccine manufacturing 1.3 Other ingredients Formaldehyde Inactivating ingredients - to kill viruses or inactivate toxins 291211 OECD, WCO 34 1. (...) Vaccine manufacturing 1.3 Other ingredients Monobasic potassium phosphate 283524 Assumed pure. (...) Vaccine manufacturing 1.3 Other ingredients Emulsifiers Emulsification - To help the water and oil based ingredients stay together More information is needed for classification ADB 41 1.
Language:English
Score: 1003561.1 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...cine_inputs_report_jun22_e.pdf
Data Source: un
The similarity of the active ingredient, including its impurities           ii. The concentration of the active ingredient and any relevant impurities           iii. (...) As a result, the hazards of the two active ingredients will be the same.   Alternatively, the active ingredients can also be equivalent , which means that the relevant impurities (and associated hazards) will not differ significantly.   (...) ii. Active ingredient concentration If the concentrations of the active ingredient(s) in the two products that are bridged are the same, bridging is facilitated.  
Language:English
Score: 994700.3 - https://www.fao.org/pesticide-...are-the-pesticide-products/ru/
Data Source: un
The similarity of the active ingredient, including its impurities           ii. The concentration of the active ingredient and any relevant impurities           iii. (...) As a result, the hazards of the two active ingredients will be the same.   Alternatively, the active ingredients can also be equivalent , which means that the relevant impurities (and associated hazards) will not differ significantly.   (...) ii. Active ingredient concentration If the concentrations of the active ingredient(s) in the two products that are bridged are the same, bridging is facilitated.  
Language:English
Score: 994700.3 - https://www.fao.org/pesticide-...are-the-pesticide-products/ar/
Data Source: un
The similarity of the active ingredient, including its impurities           ii. The concentration of the active ingredient and any relevant impurities           iii. (...) As a result, the hazards of the two active ingredients will be the same.   Alternatively, the active ingredients can also be equivalent , which means that the relevant impurities (and associated hazards) will not differ significantly.   (...) ii. Active ingredient concentration If the concentrations of the active ingredient(s) in the two products that are bridged are the same, bridging is facilitated.  
Language:English
Score: 994700.3 - https://www.fao.org/pesticide-...are-the-pesticide-products/en/
Data Source: un
Maple flavoured syrup Maple syrup flavoured Flavoured Maple syrup Mandatory labelling • name, • ingredients, • possible allergens always to be declared • added water • allergen transferred through GM • specific name or class name for ingredients • food additives – class titles • net contents • country of origin • lot identification • date marking • instructions for use Labelling in commodity standards • Exemptions from or additions to the GS allowed if needed by the product in question • CCFL endorses all labelling provisions • Tendency to harmonise with the general standard Quantitative labelling of ingredients The ingoing percentage of an ingredient ... shall be disclosed for foods sold as a mixture or combination where the ingredient: – (a) is emphasised as present on the label through words or pictures or graphics; or – (b) is not within the name of the food, is essential to characterise the food and is expected to be present in the food by consumers in the country where the food is sold if the omission of the quantitative ingredient declaration would mislead or deceive the consumer. QUID Water Sorbitol Vegetable gum Natural flavours Salt Citric acid Caramel colour Preservatives Sweetener Is this last example in line with Codex texts? 5.1 Quantitative ingredients declaration (QUID) 5.1.1 The ingoing percentage of an ingredient (including compound ingredients or categories of ingredients), by weight or volume as appropriate, at the time of manufacture, shall be disclosed for foods sold as a mixture or combination where the ingredient: (a) is emphasized as present on the label through words or pictures or graphics; or 0% Maple syrup QUID: example2 Two examples where quid is triggered for “lentil soup” 35% lentils 22% lentils QUID: example3 5% fruits and 1.5% yoghurt. (...) (also suggested in Guidelines for the Conduct of Microbiological Risk Management (CAC/GL 63- 2007)) • Certain known allergens are always included in the list of ingredients even if they are present as sub-ingredients of composite foods below the cut-off level of 5 per cent. • The presence of any of these allergens occurring as a result of transfer through genetic modification must also be declared.
Language:English
Score: 987870.4 - https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tbt_e/3_Codex_e.pdf
Data Source: un
    # Description of HHP Criteria 1 to 8 Explanation 1 Pesticide formulations that meet the criteria of  Classes Ia or Ib  of the  WHO Recommended Classification  of Pesticides by Hazard 2 Pesticide active ingredients and their formulations that meet the criteria of  carcinogenicity Categories 1A and 1B  of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals ( GHS ) 3 Pesticide active ingredients and their formulations that meet the criteria of  mutagenicity Categories 1A and 1B  of the  GHS 4 Pesticide active ingredients and their formulations that meet the criteria of  reproductive toxicity Categories 1A and 1B  of the  GHS 5 Pesticide active ingredients listed by the  Stockholm Convention  in its  Annexes A and B , and those meeting all the criteria in paragraph 1 of  annex D  of the Convention 6 Pesticide active ingredients and formulations listed by the  Rotterdam Convention  in its  Annex III 7 Pesticides listed under the  Montreal Protocol 8 Pesticide active ingredients and formulations that have shown a  high incidence of severe or irreversible adverse effects  on human health or the environment. (...) Enter your products in either sheet depending on the number of Active Ingredients (A.I.) in the product: "One A.I.(entry)", "Two A.I.s (entry)" or "Three A.I.s (entry)"  Complete the required information for the different criteria, based on data from the dossier or online sources. The spreadsheet will calculate the WHO classification of the formulated product in case only LD50 values of the active ingredients are available. When finished, check the summary pages ("One A.I (summary)" etc. to see which products are marked as HHP.
Language:English
Score: 985520.1 - https://www.fao.org/pesticide-...hhp/identification-of-hhps/en/
Data Source: un
It is recommended to use the terms yield and nutrient retention factors instead of NLG factors. Ingredient level: Term is used when yield factor is applied separately to the weight of each ingredient or when retention factor is applied separately to nutrient content of each ingredient. (...) Apply yield factor to the total raw weight. Ingredient raw weight g yield factor cooked weight g Ingredient A A g Ingredient B B g Ingredient C C g Total weight g A+B+C (g) YF............................... (...) Apply the corresponding retention factor (RF) for the nutrient X for each ingredient: Ingredient nutrient X in g per 100 g retention factor nutrient X in g per 100 g of cooked weight of cooked weight before retention factor after retention factor is taken into account (Y) is taken into account (Z) Ingredient A YA g RFA (YA)*( RFA) = ZA Ingredient B YB g RFB (YB)*( RFB) = ZB Ingredient C YC g RFC (YC)*( RFC) = ZC Total nutrient X (YA + YB + YC) g (ZA+ZB+ZC) g Summarising this table, the following equation can be applied: Corrected nutrient content per 100 g of cooked weight (Z) = Nutrient content per 100 g ingredient* Raw weight of ingredient (g) * Retention factor Total cooked weight (g) Note that this equation applies for each ingredient.
Language:English
Score: 985069.8 - https://www.fao.org/uploads/me...2007_recipe_rulesD2.2.9_02.pdf
Data Source: un
Microbiological or enzymatic ingredients | Microbiological or enzymatic ingredients such as starter cultures, yeast cultures, enzymes for food manufacture and moulds or micro-fungal cultures. 18.    (...) Egg-based dishes | Composite dishes, excluding soups, which main ingredient is egg, such as omelette with different ingredients, etc. 18.4.         (...) Salad-based dishes | Composite dishes, which main ingredients are fresh vegetables, typically containing other ingredients such as meat, grains, legumes, cheese, oil, etc. 19.   
Language:English
Score: 983832.8 - https://www.fao.org/gift-indiv...food-groups-and-sub-groups/zh/
Data Source: un