Home

Results 41 - 50 of 12,948 for injected. Search took 3.159 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
Most infections are acquired sexually, but injecting drug use dominates in the north-east of the country. In this area, infection levels of 60–75% have been found among injecting drug users relying on non-sterile injecting equipment. (...) VIETNAM: Focus on injecting drug users Vietnam has one of the newest epidemics in the South-East Asian region.
Language:English
Score: 928375 - https://www.who.int/3by5/media...entre/en/Broll_Bangkok2004.pdf
Data Source: un
Select language Select language English TiếngViệt Western Pacific Viet Nam Home Health topics Our work News Emergencies About us Home / News / Feature stories / Detail / Early HIV treatment: Tackling HIV among injecting drug users in Vietnam Early HIV treatment: Tackling HIV among injecting drug users in Vietnam 20 July 2014 - Select language - Tiếng Việt WHO Viet Nam/C. Doan Nguyen Trong Hoa has been injecting heroin for 19 years but in January he finally knew he had to get help. (...) “Viet Nam has been very progressive in tackling HIV by promoting needle-syringe programmes, methadone maintenance therapy and condom use among high risk groups and it is now time to accelerate access to HIV testing and treatment, especially for people who inject drugs,” says Dr Masaya Kato of WHO Viet Nam office.
Language:English
Score: 927512.3 - https://www.who.int/vietnam/ne...njecting-drug-users-in-vietnam
Data Source: un
Globally, just 70% of countries surveyed explicitly address the needs of men who have sex with men and sex workers, while the figure for injecting drug users was 40%. Transgender people are rarely mentioned in HIV plans. (...) For example, in some settings in Eastern Europe, people who inject drugs make up more than half of all people living with HIV, but only one third of people living with HIV have access to lifesaving ART. (...) Malaysia, Spain and the United Republic of Tanzania have made major advances in providing opioid substitution therapy and needles and syringe programmes for people who inject drugs. Data show that where a combination of effective HIV prevention and treatment services for people who inject drugs are available, HIV transmission among people who inject drugs is minimal.”
Language:English
Score: 926631 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...-the-health-services-they-need
Data Source: un
Findings Sixty-seven cohorts of people who inject drugs were identified, 14 of them from low- and middle-income countries. (...) Comparison of CMRs and the calculation of CMR ratios revealed mortality to be higher in low- and middle-income country cohorts, males and people who injected drugs that were positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). (...) Conclusion Compared with the general population, people who inject drugs have an elevated risk of death, although mortality rates vary across different settings.
Language:English
Score: 924460 - https://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/91/2/12-108282-ab/en/
Data Source: un
Lessons learned and next steps 01/02/2021 | Title of the presentation 3 Objectives and scope of survey 4 Objective 2: Assess health workforce (facilities and CHWs) capacities and maintenance of essential health services throughout the pandemic Objective 1: Assess current and surge capacities of hospitals for COVID-19 case management (& availability of essential tools) Based on country priorities and objectives, Kenya survey included 3 modules (facility and community levels): COVID-19 case management capacities Continuity of essential health services Community needs, perceptions and demand M od ul e Assess current and surge capacities of health facilities for COVID-19 management, (vaccine readiness, therapeutics, diagnostics, PPE, oxygen) Assess health facility and health workforce capacities to maintain safe provision of essential health services Assess community health needs, access to care, care-seeking behaviours, barriers, and disruptions to community-based care U se Guide rapid deployment and scale up of essential COVID-19 clinical tools and supplies Detect and track changes in service utilization, service delivery modifications, and staff capacities and protection to guide strategies to mitigate disruptions Guide strategies and plans to address unmet health needs and eliminate barriers to care Methodology and sampling Rapid phone survey with frontline service facility managers and CHWs completed in one week (14-21 December 2020) q Kenya Health Master Facility List (KHMFL) was used as sampling frame (12,758 health facilities total) q A purposive sample of 132 sentinel health facilities was obtained from the sampling frame with a total of 121 respondents for the facility assessments (C19-CM + CEHS) q Community assessment was used in a sample of 51 community health workers (CHWs). 5 Disaggregation Number interviewed by assessment module Total facilities C19-CM CEHS Community All 121 74 91 51 Level of care Community Health Workers 51 n/a n/a 51 Level 2 - Dispensaries and clinics 32 0 32 n/a Level 3 - Health centres 14 2 12 n/a Level 4 - Sub-county hospitals and medium-sized private hospitals 48 45 41 n/a Level 5 - County referral hospitals and large private hospitals 22 22 6 n/a Level 6 - National referral hospitals and large private teaching hospitals 5 5 0 n/a Location Urban 53 46 33 26 Rural 68 28 58 25 Managing authority Non-public 31 16 24 n/a Public 90 58 67 n/a Disaggregation Number interviewed by assessment module Total facilities C19-CM CEHS Community All 121 74 91 51 Level of care Community Health Workers 51 n/a n/a 51 Level 2 - Dispensaries and clinics 32 0 32 n/a Level 3 - Health centres 14 2 12 n/a Level 4 - Sub-county hospitals and medium-sized private hospitals 48 45 41 n/a Level 5 - County referral hospitals and large private hospitals 22 22 6 n/a Level 6 - National referral hospitals and large private teaching hospitals 5 5 0 n/a Location Urban 53 46 33 26 Rural 68 28 58 25 Managing authority Non-public 31 16 24 n/a Public 90 58 67 n/a Objective 1: Assess current and surge capacities of health facilities for COVID-19 case management (essential clinical tools and supplies) q Availability of PPE, IPC items, and COVID-19 safe environment measures q COVID-19 medicines (including oxygen) q Diagnostic capacities q Vaccine readiness and community acceptance q Bed capacities 6 MINISTRY OF HEALTH OF KENYA Availability of PPE in frontline services Major gaps in availability of PPE across all health care settings Percent of facilities with available PPE (n=121) 7 q Medical masks are generally available, but not enough PPE for all health workers q Only 15% of facilities have all required PPE, and only 48% of hospitals have respirators for all staff. 15 33 59 28 28 48 91 49 39 15 46 43 48 4 36 28 26 26 29 4 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 All PPE items Protective gown Examination gloves Protective goggles Face shield Respirator (N95, KN95, or FFP2)* Mask (medical/surgical) Percentage % of facilities with PPE available for all staff % of facilities with PPE available for some staff % of facilities without PPE avaiable *Respirator (N95, KN95, or FFP2) availability based only on level 5 (county referral hospitals and large private hospitals) and level 6 (national referral hospitals and large private teaching hospitals) COVID-19 safe environment and IPC measures Overall, the situation is positive, with most IPC measures in place in most facilities (but only 1/3 performing screening of staff) Percent of facilities that have implemented measures to create COVID-19 safe environment (n=91) 8 97 96 95 91 91 90 88 73 37 27 85 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Hand hygiene for staff Hand sanitizer Distancing Screening of patients/visitors Cleaning and disinfecting Instructions displayed Screening and triage of COVID-19 patients Isolation Staff screening 100% of measures Average implementation of measures Percentage availability Essential life-saving medicines Some shortages in COVID-19 medicines in COVID-19 treatment centres (only about ¼ of facilities had all 10 tracer medicines) Percent of COVID-19 treatment centres with available tracer medicines (n=74) 9 78 26 49 53 59 77 80 88 88 89 97 99 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Average availability of tracer medicines All tracer medicines available Ampicillin (injectable) Cistracurium (injectable) or Vecuronium Haloperidol (injectable) Heparin (injectable) Epinephrine or norepinephrine (injectable) Azithromycin (for oral administration) Morphine (injectable) or other opiate Hydrocortisone or dexamethasone (injectable) Ceftriaxone (injectable) Intravenous fluids: normal saline Percentage availability Access to oxygen All assessed COVID-19 treatment centres have access to at least one source of oxygen; about half have access to invasive and slightly below half non-invasive ventilators to treat critical and severe COVID-19 patients (with situation worse in rural facilities) Percent of COVID-19 treatment centres with oxygen available (n=74) 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Pulse oximeters Invasive ventilator Non-invasive ventilators Pe rc en t o f f ac ili tie s Overall (n=74) Rural (n=28) Urban (n=46) Percent of COVID-19 treatment centres with oxygen equipment available and functioning 39 41 72 93 100 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 External supply (bulk) Liquid or PSA oxygen generator plant Oxygen concentrator External supply - cylinders Any source of oxygen Percent of facilities Diagnostic capacity: Only 1 in 7 COVID-19 treatment centres has PCR testing on site Significant delays in turnaround time for receiving test results (58% facilities wait 3+ days). (...) Community acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination Communities have high levels of concern about COVID-19 and COVID-19 vaccination (33% of CHWs believe vaccine uptake will be challenging ) 13 33 31 29 22 24 30 45 45 41 0 20 40 60 80 100 Will vaccinate themselves Will vaccinate child Will vaccinate child/themselves Percent of community health workers No or few people Some people Most people Percent of community health workers who believe people are concerned about COVID-19 and will receive COVID-19 vaccination (n=51) 67% of CHWs believe most in the community are worried about COVID- 19 Hospital capacities for COVID-19 case management Overall capacities are good, but major shortages in PPE (on average, facilities can only provide just over half tracer PPE items to all staff) 15 97 91 78 74 64 55 0 20 40 60 80 100 Supplies (5 items) IPC items (6 items) Medicines (10 items) COVID diagnostics (3 items) Equipment (4 items) PPE for all staff (6 items) Tracer items Equipment (4 items) – Pulse oximeter, invasive ventilator, non- invasive ventilator, x-ray machine Supplies (5 items) – Syringes and needles, IV cannulas and giving sets, gauze, 5% Chlorhexidine gluconate, Sodium hypochlorite 4-6% Chlorine Medicines (10 items) – Epinephrine or norepinephrine (injectable), Ceftriaxone (injectable), Ampicillin (injectable), Azithromycin (for oral administration), Cistracurium (injectable) or Vecuronium, Haloperidol (injectable), Morphine (injectable) or other opiate, Heparin (injectable), Hydrocortisone or dexamethasone (injectable), Intravenous fluids: normal saline PPE (6 items) – Protective gown, examination gloves, protective goggles, face shield, respirator masks (N95 or FFP2), medical/surgical mask IPC items (6 items) – Liquid Soap, bio-hazardous bag, safety boxes, body bags, hand washing stations, hand sanitizer COVID-19 diagnostics (3 items) - Receives test results within three days, have functioning thermocycler, all three specimen collection items (triple packing boxes for transport, viral transport medium with swab, functional transport system) Average percent of tracer items available in 91 facilities providing essential health services Percent of that have received up-to-date information and guidelines to manage COVID cases (n=91) Availability of guidelines on management of COVID-19 has increased in facilities - Over three-quarters of health facilities (76%) indicated they had received guidelines on case management of COVID- 19 including referral. - Out of the health facilities with guidelines on case management, 53% didn’t have them in July 2020. 76 66 51 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90100 Case management, including for referral Homebased isolation and care Manage asymptomatic or mild COVID-19 cases Percent of facilities 24 27 14 15 15 7 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90100 MOH County health management team Sub-county health management team International agencies Professional associations other Percent of facilities Percent of facilities that have received up-to-date information to manage COVID cases, by source (n=91) Objective 2: Assess health facility and HWF capacities to maintain safe provision of essential health services throughout the pandemic 17 MINISTRY OF HEALTH OF KENYA Health worker /staff infections In the last 3 months, 5% of medical doctors were diagnosed with COVID-19 Overall, 3% of health workers/staff were infected in past 3 months Percent of staff diagnosed with COVID-19 in the past three months, by cadre (in 91 facilities) 01/02/2021 | Title of the presentation 18 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 Medical doctor (n=645) Nurses and Midwives (n=4342) Clinical officers (n=852) Other clinical staff (n=3272) Non clinical staff (n=2562) Weighted average (n=10821) Pe rc en ta ge o f s ta ff 5.1 3.0 4.1 3.1 2.7 3.1 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 Medical doctor (n=645) Nurses and Midwives (n=4342) Clinical officers (n=852) Other clinical staff (n=3272) Non clinical staff (n=2562) Weighted average (n=10821) Pe rc en ta ge o f s ta ff 46 37 40 38 33 49 26 29 29 25 24 35 24 22 16 15 18 18 35 48 48 50 53 38 65 59 59 57 61 51 66 67 61 81 75 75 19 15 12 12 14 13 9 12 12 18 15 14 10 11 23 4 7 7 0 20 40 60 80 100 Undifferentiated Family planning Antenatal care Postnatal care Immunization Sick Child HIV TB STIs Malaria Hypertension CRD Diabetes Cancer Mental Health Intimate partner and sexual violence NTDs Rehabilitation Percent of facilities Decrease in service volume No change in service volume Increase in service volume Percent of facilities observing changes in outpatient service utilization Disruptions (increases or decreases) observed across all health services Percent of facilities with changes in outpatient service visits in the past three months (n=91) 19 q About half of facilities (49%) reported decreases in sick child visits q Approximately 40% of facilities reported decreases in family planning, antenatal care, and postnatal care q 23% of facilities reported an increase in visits for mental health services 85 77 68 67 66 51 49 34 27 0 20 40 60 80 100 Change in service hours Targeted high-risk patients Promoted self-care Used tele-prescription Combined care into single visit Reduced scope or volume or suspended services Used home-based care Redirected patients Used tele-medicine Percentage of facilities Responsiveness of facilities to maintain essential health services: Modifying services: Percentage of facilities that modified service delivery strategies in the past three months (n=91) 20 Ø IPC measures and supplies generally in place, but major gaps in PPE availability and staff screening for COVID-19 Ø Shortages of essential clinical tools and supplies (medicines + ventilators) in COVID-19 treatment centres Ø Low availability of on-site PCR diagnostic testing + delays in turnaround time for off-site testing Ø Vaccine cold chain capacity for routine immunization available but facilities need to strengthen capacities for COVID-19 vaccine introduction Ø Concerns in communities around acceptance of vaccine may present challenge.
Language:English
Score: 918387.2 - https://www.undrr.org/sites/de...0SHWS1%20final%2028JAN21_3.pdf
Data Source: un
Third International Conference on Financing for Development Third International Conference on Financing for Development Invest Ahead - For People and Planet #FFD3 #Action2015 Home Overview Programme Initiatives Documents News & Media Blog A £735m capital increase to CDC Group to invest in businesses to create jobs in the world’s poorest places Type Government announcement Country United Kingdom Government type Central government Scope Global Themes International public finance Description The UK will make an injection of additional capital into CDC, which will be used to invest in businesses in Africa and South Asia to support job creation, crowd in additional private investment, and demonstrate that responsible investing in difficult markets can be financially viable. Partners CDC Targets The UK will make an injection of additional capital into CDC. £735m will be disbursed over 3 years. Indicators The UK will make an injection of additional capital into CDC. £735m will be disbursed over 3 years.
Language:English
Score: 918007.9 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/ffd...tal-increase-to-cdc-group.html
Data Source: un
Expert Group Meeting on Sustainable Development and CCS; September 10-11, 2007 8 Response to Big Earthquake in Nagaoka Injection Project I j ti t ti ll• Injection was automatically stopped at the main shock. • Safety inspection made:Safety inspection made: – Surface Inspection – Press & Temp G h i l L i– Geophysical Logging – Acoustic Borehole Televiewer – Cross Well Seismic Tomography • Injection was carefully Access road to the injection site No damage to the projectInjection was carefully resumed after confirming safety (6 Dec 2004) No damage to the project M. (...) Corrective action – CO2 leakage in the injection phase • The party is required to take mitigation actions such as cease of the injection activity and formation pressure release. Theof the injection activity and formation pressure release.
Language:English
Score: 917798.7 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...ntations_papers/akai_japan.pdf
Data Source: un
The US FDA approved cabotegravir extended-release - the first long-acting injectable option for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) It is administered through an intramuscular injection by a health care worker every 2 months and can be offered to adults and adolescents weighing at least 35 kilograms to reduce the risk of sexually acquired HIV. (...) “There is also urgent need for implementation projects in LMIC to better understand the safe and acceptable delivery of injectable prevention.” WHO continues to follow the HIV prevention pipeline closely and has started the process to develop guidelines for long-acting prevention approaches in early 2022.
Language:English
Score: 917119.6 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...-cabotegravir-extended-release
Data Source: un
Studies show that the most vulnerable adolescents who inject drugs use non sterile injecting equipment, thus being directly exposed to HIV and other infections.1 Meanwhile, only a third of young people in Moldova, 15-24 years of age, has comprehensive knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention.2 Even though in Moldova there are many youth friendly health centres (YFHC) working with young people, they are mostly inaccessible to the MARA and EVA groups. (...) Ministry of Health of the Republic of Moldova *Most-at-risk adolescents (MARA): Injecting drug users who use non sterile injecting equipment; males who have unprotected anal sex with males; sex workers. **Especially vulnerable adolescents (EVA): Adolescent females and males who are/have: children/parents who inject drugs; friends/peers who inject drugs/have unsafe sex; living in institutional care, especially juvenile detention; living/working on the street; migrant populations; minority or socially excluded groups. 1 Assessment of the situation of Youth in the Republic of Moldova, 2009 2 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, 2012 Capacity building • 77 professionals from NGOs and Youth Friendly Health Centres have strengthened their capaci- ties in provision of HTC services for most-at-risk and especially vulnerable adolescents; • Ukrainian representatives from NGOs, public sector, and UNICEF participated in a study visit to Moldova and exchanged experience with Moldovan professionals; • Specialists from Moldovan NGOs (“TDV”, Balti and “Healthy Life”, Tiraspol) attended a professional training course in Odessa; • Moldovan representatives partici- pated in the Regional Working Meeting on Scaling up HIV Testing and Counselling in Azerbaijan in November 2012 and learned how to improve access of the most-at- risk and vulnerable adolescents to HTC and HIV prevention, protec- tion, care and support services.
Language:English
Score: 917119.6 - https://www.unicef.org/moldova...s/2018-09/MARA%20projectEN.pdf
Data Source: un
WHO recommendation on umbilical vein injection of oxytocin for the treatment of retained placenta Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. Select language Select language English العربية 中文 Français Русский Español Home Health Topics All topics » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Resources » Fact sheets Facts in pictures Multimedia Publications Questions & answers Tools and toolkits Popular » Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Ebola virus disease Air pollution Hepatitis Top 10 causes of death World Health Assembly » Countries All countries » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Regions » Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific WHO in countries » Statistics Cooperation strategies Yemen crisis » Sadeq Al Wesabi Hasan An internally displaced family in a camp in Hudaydah © Credits   Newsroom All news » News releases Statements Campaigns Commentaries Events Feature stories Speeches Spotlights Newsletters Photo library Media distribution list Headlines » Timeline: WHO's COVID-19 response »   Emergencies Focus on » COVID-19 pandemic Ebola virus disease outbreak DRC 2021 Syria crisis Crisis in Northern Ethiopia Afghanistan Crisis Latest » Disease Outbreak News Travel advice Situation reports Weekly Epidemiological Record WHO in emergencies » Surveillance Research Funding Partners Operations Independent Oversight and Advisory Committee Health Emergency Dashboard » WHO © Credits Data Data at WHO » Global Health Estimates Health SDGs Mortality Triple billion targets Data collections Dashboards » COVID-19 Dashboard Triple Billion Dashboard Health Equity monitor Mortality Highlights » GHO SCORE Insights and visualizations Data collection tools Reports World Health Statistics 2021 » WHO © Credits About WHO About WHO » People Teams Structure Partnerships Collaborating Centres Networks, committees and advisory groups Transformation Our Work » General Programme of Work WHO Academy Activities Initiatives Funding » Assessed contributions Flexible funding WHO Foundation Accountability » Audit Budget Financial statements Programme Budget Portal Results Report Governance » World Health Assembly Executive Board Election of Director-General Governing Bodies website Home / Publications detail / WHO recommendation on umbilical vein injection of oxytocin for the treatment of retained placenta WHO recommendation on umbilical vein injection of oxytocin for the treatment of retained placenta 4 November 2020  |  Guideline Download (686.5 kB) Overview In 2019, the Executive Guideline Steering Group (GSG) for the World Health Organization (WHO) maternal and perinatal health recommendations prioritized updating of the existing WHO recommendation: Umbilical vein injection of oxytocin for the treatment of retained placenta, in response to the availability of new evidence. The recommendation in this document thus supersedes the previous WHO recommendations on “intraumbilical vein injection of oxytocin for treatment of retained placenta” as published in the 2012 guideline, WHO recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage .
Language:English
Score: 915842.5 - https://www.who.int/publicatio...-detail-redirect/9789240013940
Data Source: un