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ITU COUNCIL WORKING GROUP ON INTERNATIONAL INTERNET-RELATED PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES (CWG-INTERNET) Online Open Consultation on “The Environmental Impacts and Benefits of the Internet” (October – December 2021) USEFUL INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS Information on the Online Open Consultations Online Open Consultations are launched by the ITU Council Working Group on International Internet-related Public Policy Issues (CWG-Internet) and are held throughout the period between two successive CWG-Internet meetings. (...) During the Virtual Meeting, respondents to the online consultation will have the opportunity to present their submitted views and to have a fruitful discussion with the other participants, including Members of the CWG-Internet. TOPIC OF DISCUSSION Following the instructions of Council Resolution 1336 (Mod. 2019) , the 16th Session of the ITU Council Working Group on International Internet-related Public Policy Issues (CWG-Internet) , decided on 23 September 2021, to hold an online open consultation on the following topic :   “The Environmental Impacts and Benefits of the Internet” · What effects does the Internet have on the environment and vice-versa? (...) · What are the policy, regulatory and other relevant matters associated with the environmental impacts and benefits of the Internet? CWG-Internet invites all stakeholders to submit contributions on the Environmental Impacts and Benefits of the Internet.
Language:English
Score: 593742.77 - https://www.itu.int/en/council...ions_Oct%202021%20%281%29.docx
Data Source: un
International Telecommunication Union International Telecommunication Union Myanmar, September 2014 ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS ITU/BDT Regional Economic and Financial Forum of Telecommun ​ications/I ​CTs for Asia and Pacific Evolution of Internet market offers, convergence and service bundling Myanmar, 1-2 September, 2014 Oscar González Soto ITU Consultant Expert Spain oscar.gso@gmail.com International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 2 Agenda • Key factors driving the offers • Influence of Convergence • Historical evolution of market offers • Service bundling offers and trends International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 3 Key factors driving the offers Network technology and convergence Higher capacities at lower costs Competition level and market fairness Regulatory rules and Optimization of the offers New services market and consumer capabilities Consumer motivation and affordability Resource consumption and service provisioning costs Economic sustainability Economy of scale and service packaging Operational cost reduction and easier relation to consumer International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 4 Key factors driving the offers: evolution of optic capacities Source: NTT International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 5 Key factors driving the offers: historical cost reduction for Ethernet 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 $3,500 $3,000 $2,500 $2,000 $1,500 $1,000 $500 $0 Source: Dell’Oro Group International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 November, 2007 Business feasibility area limited by positive NPV and payment affordability Revenues per customer/year (ARPU) Volume of Customers/type Pressure by required NPV and IRR r1 $ n1 Pressure by payment capability, churn or regulation constraints Business Feasibility area: r2 $ n2 Key factors driving the offers: Competition level International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 7 Agenda • Key factors driving the offers • Influence of Convergence • Historical evolution of market offers • Service bundling offers and trends International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 8 The five dimensions of the economy of scale: By Size of the systems within a technology By Technology capabilities By Traffic efficiency with the occupancy By customers Density By Volume of purchasing Influence of Convergence: higher economic efficiencies Economic benefits per dimension: Cost reduction per unit (i.e.: 10% to 30%) New technologies with higher productivity (i.e.: x4 capacity with 1.2 in cost) Better utilization for a given GoS when larger systems (i.e.: +20%) Quadratic decrease with coverage radio increase Discount per volume in log scale (i.e.: up to 40%) International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 November, 2007 Internet Internet & VoDSL Internet & Video Services bundling (reference) Y0 Y1 Y2 Y3 Y4 Y5 Y6 Y7 Y8 Y9 Y10 Year -2e+08 -1e+08 0e+08 1e+08 2e+08 3e+08 4e+08 5e+08 6e+08 7e+08 N P V ( E u ro ) Influence of Convergence: Business effects of service packaging Effects of the mix of services on the Network NPV in a NGN network: • Major impact of service classes on NPV and company survivability • High benefit of services bundling International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 10 Agenda • Key factors driving the offers • Influence of Convergence • Historical evolution of market offers • Service bundling offers and trends International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 11 Highlights per country: Philippines case at 2011 Diagram illustrates the relations between speeds and prices that show a significant linear increase with speeds. (...) Data fixed line 2 Mbps to 10 Mbps 1 Mbps to 3 Mbps Data fixed line+ voice services Four play +(extra) 8 Mbps to 100 Mbps Data and voice fixed line+mobile Speed range Internet alone (nacked) Internet pack (+extra) Dual play (+ extra) Triple play (+extra) Data and voice fixed line+mobile+TV International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 22 Service bundling offers and trends: Variety of offer types It is observed a large variety of dispersion among entry level and average offers per country (Source: Point topic) International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 23 Service bundling offers and trends: Bundle elements Main offer elements Typical cases Connectivity - xDSL, FO, Radio Fixed voice services - Voice at Digital quality, High quality - Value added services Mobile services - Voice, SMS, Data at 3G, 4G speeds - Data volume from 100 Mb to 1 Gb and unlimitted Fixed Internet services - Speeds from 512 Kbps up to 100 Mbps and 1 Gbps TV services - Basic channels up to more than 100 channels, live events and content on demand Others - Minutes of conversation for fixed and mobile since fixed minutes to unlimited for national calls and also for selected international countries, security, etc. International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 24 Service bundling offers and trends: Sample case: PLDT Philippines PLDT Home Offer content Prices (USD/ month) Triple play: Plan 1899 -Connectivity: xDSL, -IFixed voice unlimited minutes landline -Internet at 3.5 Mbps unlimited volume -TVo MSF 42,7 Triple play: Plan 2899 -Connectivity: xDSL, -IFixed voice unlimited minutes landline -Internet at 5.5 Mbps unlimited volume -TVo MSF 65 Triple play: Plan 3899 -Connectivity: xDSL, -IFixed voice unlimited minutes landline -Internet at 8.5 Mbps unlimited volume -TVo MSF 87 Currency change at July 2014 International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 25 Service bundling offers and trends: Sample case: Indonesia Max3 Internet cable TV Offer content Prices (USD/ month) Double play Family package -Connectivity: HFC cable -Internet at 5 Mbps unlimited volume -TV channels: 58 SD and 20 HD 42,8 Double play Theater package -Connectivity: HFC cable -Internet at 10 Mbps unlimited volume -TV channels: 65 SD and 27 HD 85,5 Currency change at July 2014 International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 26 Service bundling offers and trends: Sample case: Malaysia TM Unify Home fiber Offer content Prices (USD/ month) Triple play VIP 5 -Connectivity: FO -Internet at 5 Mbps unlimited volume -Free phone service -TV channels: Selected HYPPTV 46,3 Triple play VIP 10 Connectivity: FO -Internet at 10 Mbps unlimited volume - Free phone service -TV channels: Selected HYPPTV 61,8 Triple play VIP 20 Connectivity: FO -Internet at 20 Mbps unlimited volume - Free phone service -TV channels: Selected HYPPTV and TV sports 77,3 Currency change at July 2014 International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 27 Service bundling offers and trends: Sample case: Singapore SingTel bundle Offer content Prices (USD/ month) Triple play -Connectivity: FO -Fixed voice with unlimited local calls -Home BB internet at 200 Mbps up to 40 GB month -TV family package with more than 50 channels 39 Four play -Connectivity: FO -Fixed voice with unlimited local calls -Mobile plan 150 Mb -Home BB internet at 300 Mbps -TV family package with more than 50 channels 47 Four play -Connectivity: FO -Fixed voice with unlimited local calls -Mobile plan 150 Mb -Home BB internet at 500 Mbps -TV Family package with more than 50 channels -Security suite 63,5 Currency change at July 2014 International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 28 Service bundling offers and trends: Sample case: Japan KDDI bundle Offer content Prices (USD/ month) Triple play: Mansion plan for higher housing grouping -Connectivity: FO -Fixed voice with free calls in promotion period -Home BB internet at 1 Gbps -TV HD Hikari package with more than 80 channels and optionally premium video , Karaoke, etc. 58 Triple play: Home plan: for lower housing grouping -Connectivity: FO -Fixed voice with free calls in promotion period -Home BB internet at 1Gbps -TV HD Hikari package with more than 80 channels and optionally premium video , Karaoke, etc. 70,8 Currency change at July 2014 International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 29 Service bundling offers and trends: Sample case: Movistar in Spain Movistar fusion Offer content Prices (USD/ month) Four play “Contigo 10” -Connectivity: xDSL, Radio 4G -Fixed voice unlimited minutes national and internet at 10 Mbps unlimited volume -Mobile voice with 100 minute free and data up to 100 Mb -Basic TV channels 56,7 (tax inc) Four play “Contigo 100” -Connectivity: FO, Radio 4G -Fixed voice unlimited minutes national and internet at 100 Mbps unlimited volume -Mobile voice with 100 minute free and data up to 100 Mb -Extended TV channels 72,8 (tax inc) Four play “Para todos” -Connectivity: FO, Radio 4G -Fixed voice unlimited minutes national and internet at 100 Mbps unlimited volume -Mobile voice unlimited minutes and data up to 1 Gb -More than 80 TV channels, recording and live events 97 (tax inc) Currency change at July 2014 International Telecommunication Union ITU - Evolution of internet market offers - OGS Myanmar, September 2014 30 Service bundling offers and trends: Benefits as perceived by consumers Significant saving in price for the overall set of services (typical: between 10% and 30%) Just one bill to pay and control Single contact point for customer support Additional benefits like mobile bounds, storage memory, minutes of conversation, cloud services, etc.
Language:English
Score: 593734.96 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R..._OscarGS_Internet%20offers.pdf
Data Source: un
Rapporteur Groups activity on International Internet Connectivity   عربي   |   中文   |   Español   |   Français   |   Русский     Advanced Search   Home : ITU-T Home     International Internet Connectivity Rapporteur Groups activity One of the more important decisions taken by the ITU relates to a recommendation (D.50) regarding Internet traffic exchange or so-called "peering" or transit arrangements between Internet service providers and Internet backbone providers which is needed in order for the ISPs to obtain global Internet connectivity for users of the Internet. (...) At the meeting the main discussions focused on how traffic is actually exchanged on the Internet so that all delegates were able to properly understand how the mechanisms of Internet connectivity actually work and how backbone network service providers operate and conclude agreements with local or international Internet service providers. (...) Presentations by Cable and Wireless and AT&T provided extensive information and data about the working of the Internet and about changes in the Internet market.These presentations also addressed the ways in which Internet traffic is becoming more regional in nature.
Language:English
Score: 593724.56 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/2005-2008/com03/iic/rapp.html
Data Source: un
Q13.1-E.doc Q. 13/1 Promotion of infrastructure and use of the Internet in developing countries 1 Issue proposed for study This question is directed toward providing practical suggestions for increasing Internet infrastructure build-out and use. In particular, it focuses on how to create a capital-attracting, pro-competitive policy environment that will foster infrastructure build-out, as well as the policy environment suited to best foster Internet development. This question is also geared toward developing human capacity in technical expertise related to the Internet. (...) In developing the recommendations of best policy practices, particular attention would be given to those countries having a high degree of Internet penetration or high Internet growth rates.
Language:English
Score: 593617.5 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/stud...3/QuestionDefinition/Q13_1.pdf
Data Source: un
Statement on Climate Change and the Internet DYNAMIC COALITION ON INTERNET AND CLIMATE CHANGE (DCICC*) Statement On Climate Change and the Internet The Internet has undergone explosive growth in recent years and plays a critical role in all phases of economic and social activity. (...) In response, the Internet community is endeavoring to mitigate its own carbon footprint through new energy-efficient data centers, servers, applications and networks, and through the increased use of renewable energy supplies to power the Internet infrastructure. (...) Governments, the private sector, and the user community, each have their role to play in deploying ICTs in other sectors to maximum effect and to promote sustainable development. Internet Governance. It is of the utmost importance that policymakers, stakeholders and governance of the Internet at all levels, national, regional and international; take full account of the need for sustainable growth of the Internet.
Language:English
Score: 593597.17 - https://www.itu.int/themes/cli...nd-meeting/DCICC-Statement.pdf
Data Source: un
States should strengthen internet governance, effectively prevent and fight acts of IT abuse that violate children’s rights, create conditions to facilitate children’s enjoyment, through internet, of their rights, such as the rights to education, assembly, family environment, health and well-being, strengthen internet supervision, and take legislative and enforcement measures to fight cybercrime, and effectively protect children from harmful information on internet. Ⅰ. (...) States should take legislative, judicial and administrative measures to create, through collaboration among the governments, internet businesses and schools, an internet environment that is favorable to children’s healthy growth. (...) In the digital environment, children’s right to culture, leisure and play should be ensured with adequate emphasis on children’s need for mental and physical health and education, especially the need to prevent children from internet addiction. States should take measures to build children’s character traits for internet, and to raise their awareness and capabilities for safe and rational use of internet.
Language:English
Score: 593597.17 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...alEnvironment/States/China.doc
Data Source: un
More details can be found in the Final Acts of the Conference, signed by 153 Member States on 22 October 2010. Internet issues Agreement on Internet issues gets thumbs up! Internet issues were among the most hotly debated. (...) The inclusion of the footnote in the four Internet resolutions sends a strong signal that ITU wishes to work with others involved in Internet governance.
Language:English
Score: 593574.1 - https://www.itu.int/net/itunews/issues/2010/09/15.aspx
Data Source: un
ICTs, LDCs and the SDGs - Achieving universal and affordable Internet in the least developed countries Acknowledgements Foreword 1 Introduction 1.1 The Least Developed Countries (LDCs) 1.2 Broadband Internet for the LDCs 1.3 SDG Target 9.c and the Internet 1.4 Digital gaps between LDCs and the rest of the world 1.4.1 The connectivity gap 1.4.2 The affordability gap 1.4.3 The socio-economic gap 1.4.4 Roadmap to the rest of the report 2 Expanding supply-side infrastructure 2.1 Local access networks 2.1.1 Mobile 2.1.2 Broadband 2.1.3 Quality 2.1.4 Electricity 2.2 National and regional backbones 2.2.1 National backbones 2.2.2 Regional and cross-border connections 2.2.3 International connectivity 2.3 The "Invisible Mile" 2.3.1 Moving to the fifth generation of regulation 2.3.2 Spectrum management 2.3.3 Infrastructure sharing, data protection and cybersecurity 2.3.4 Universal service funds 2.4 Conclusions 3 Sustaining the Internet ecosystem 3.1 The underappreciated ccTLD 3.2 The critical role of data centres 3.3 IXPs: Beyond exchanging traffic 3.4 Conclusions 4 Making the Internet affordable 4.1 Rethinking affordability 4.2 How much data is enough? (...) 4.4 Competition and pricing 4.5 Conclusions 5 Skills for using the Internet 5.1 Digital literacy 5.2 The power of secondary education 5.3 Digital literacy for the masses 5.4 Conclusions 6 Progress towards achieving SDG Target 9.c 6.1 Leap-frogging 6.2 Recommendations References Annex 1 Basic Indicators, 2016 Infrastructure Access Indicators, 2016 Infrastructure Backbone Indicators, 2016 Core Internet Infrastructure Indicators, 2016 Affordability Indicators, 2016 Skills Indicators The three dimensions of SDG Target 9.c (Access, Affordability and Skills) and Internet Uptake Table 1.1: LDCs by ITU region and income grouping Table 2.1: Preparation of households with a mobile phone (in %) broken down by urban/rural households, latest available survey (2012-2016), LDCs Table 2.2: Submarine cables in Africa Table 2.3: LDCs by generation of regulation Table 3.1: LDCs with active IXP, 2017 Table 6.1: Top performers by category Table 6.2: Performance across three dimensions of Internet use: access, affordability and skills Table 6.3: Experienced strategic private investors in Bangladesh and Myanmar Figure 1.1: Key components that will drive the achievement of SDG Target 9.c to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020. Figure 1.2: Map of LDCs according to ITU regional classification The Pink Phones project in Cambodia empowers female farmers Figure 1.3: Internet use and proportion of population not online by country, 2017, LDCs Figure 1.4: ICT penetration levels by level of development, 2017 Figure 1.5: Route metres of fibre and microwave backbone per capita by region, 2016 Figure 1.6: Share of total international Internet bandwidth and International Internet bandwidth per inhabitant, by region Figure 1.7: Progress towards the target of making broadband affordable, 2016 Figure 1.8: Fixed- and mobile broadband prices 2016, and mobile broadband prices 2013-2016 Figure 1.9: Proportion of individuals using the Internet by gender 2016, and Internet user gender gap 2013 and 2017 Figure 1.10: Demand- and supply-side measures to increase Internet use Figure 2.1: The different miles of ICT infrastructure Figure 2.2: Mobile cellular subscriptions (per 100 inhabitants) Figure 2.3: 2G Mobile coverage (% of population), LDCs Figure 2.4: Availability of 3G network and 3G coverage (% of population), LDCs Figure 2.5: Average webpage load time (seconds), first quarter 2016, LDCs Figure 2.6: Access to electricity Figure 2.7: Price of electricity, 2016 Figure 2.8: Generations of regulation Figure 2.9: LDCs with a universal service fund and percentage of funds disbursed in African LDCs Figure 3.1: The virtuous cycle of local Internet infrastructure Figure 3.2: ccTLD processing model Figure 3.3: LDCs: Distribution of ccTLDs (left) and central governments using ccTLD (right), 2017 Figure 3.4: Relation between ccTLD registrations and Internet users Figure 3.5: Marketing the .SN ccTLD in Senegal, 2017 Figure 3.6: Small businesses online web presence in selected economies (left) and reasons for not having a website, 2015 (right) Figure 3.7: Tanzania: ccTLD registrations (left) and estimated impact from additional local web hosting (right) Figure 3.8: Impact of local hosting in Rwanda Figure 3.9: Lao PDR Energy Efficient Datacenter (LEED) compared to conventional data centre Figure 3.10: IXPs in LDCs Figure 3.11: Fibre-optic submarine cables landing and planned in Djibouti Figure 3.12: Fundamental Internet infrastructure in LDCs, June 2017 Figure 4.1: ITU prepaid mobile broadband price basket (at least 500 MB per month), 2016 Figure 4.2: Relation between mobile broadband basket and Internet usage, 2015, LDCs Figure 4.3: Seven strata of Zambian households Figure 4.4: Communications as percentage of household expenditure and MTN data bundles available Figure 4.5: MTN Zambia hourly, daily and weekly plans, June 2017 Figure 4.6: Main reason for selecting a mobile provider and barriers to household Internet access, Zambia, 2015 Figure 4.7: Zambia, Internet use by education and age, 2015 Figure 4.8: Mobile Internet bundles in the LDCs, 2017 Figure 4.9: MTN, Mobile data usage per month (left) and relation between mobile data usage per month and mobile broadband price basket Figure 4.10: Fixed and mobile prices in Bhutan (left) and Bangladesh (right), US$, 2017 Figure 4.11: OTT versus mobile network in Senegal, 2017 Figure 4.12: OTT in Cambodia and Africa Figure 4.13: Facebook Free Basics and m.wikipedia, June 2017 Figure 4.14: Impact of competition on mobile broadband prices and bundles Figure 4.15: 2017 Affordability Drivers Index (ADI) Figure 5.1: Barriers to Internet use in Malawi (left) and Zambia (right) Figure 5.2: Internet use and level of education in Bangladesh (left) and Malawi (right) Figure 5.3: Internet use, ages 15-24 for men and women in Lao PDR (left), and in selected economies (right) Figure 5.4: Relation between education indicators and Internet use, LDCs Figure 5.5: Secondary Gross Enrolment Ratio Figure 5.6: Rwanda Internet supply and demand (left) and proportion of population that is digitally literate and projected to be computer literate (right) Figure 6.1: Projections for mobile 3G coverage, mobile broadband prices, secondary school enrolment and Internet use, LDCs Figure 6.2: The three drivers of Internet use Figure 6.3: The three dimensions of Internet use Figure 6.4: Leap-frogging Box 1-1: ICTs and the SDGs – Target 9.c recognizes the importance of the Internet for the LDCs Box 1-2: The least developed countries and the ICT Development Index Box 2-1: Competition, privatization and strong operators in Mali Box 2-2: Timor-Leste: Three is better than one Box 2-3: PPPs for 4G in Rwanda Box 2-4: Comparing fixed- to mobile-broadband networks Box 2-5: National backbone development in Senegal Box.2-6: Tanzania's ICT Broadband Backbone for National and Regional Connectivity Box 2-7: Burundi Backbone System (BBS) Box 2-8: The six sea-facing LDCs without submarine connectivity Box 2-9: Winning formulas for fixed- and mobile-broadband markets Box 3-1: The economics of free hosting Box 3-2: Development of a Cloud Computing Strategy in Ethiopia Box 3-3: From a development project to a growing IXP: Bangladesh Internet Exchange Box 3-4: Help for the formation of technical Internet skills: The case of Myanmar Box 4-1: Cellphones in Cambodia: Smartphones, electricity and Khmer Box 4-2: Number of hours of work to pay for a mobile Internet bundle Box 4-3: Redefining affordability and setting a new target: "1 for 2" to achieve SDG Target 9.c Box 4-4: Taking on OTT in Bangladesh Box 4-5: Hijacking zero-rated services in Angola Box 4-6: Ticking all the right regulatory boxes but still relatively high prices: The case of Uganda Box 4-7: Gauging polices affecting Internet affordability in Mozambique Box 4-8: Mobile affordability in Haiti Box 5-1: Use of universal service funds for school connectivity in Uganda Box 5-2: With smartphones does local content become more important than digital literacy?  
Language:English
Score: 593451.6 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it...-LDC-ICTLDC-2018-TOC-HTM-E.htm
Data Source: un
E-Business, IT and Telecoms (EBITT) Internet Backbone Interconnection Agreements Highlights  Overview of Internet backbone interconnection agreements  Recent trends  Paid peering, settlement-free peering, and transit  ICC priorities Document No. 373/499 – (27 July 2011) Discussion Paper ICC Discussion Paper on Internet Backbone Interconnection Agreements Document number 373/499 – page 2 Internet Backbone Interconnection Agreements Discussion paper In the more than fifteen years since the commercialization of the Internet backbone, unprecedented innovation and investment has resulted in a huge increase in global Internet availability and usage. During this period, a wide variety of commercially negotiated Internet backbone interconnection arrangements connecting national and international Internet backbone providers, content providers and Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have fuelled and sustained the massive growth of the Internet into a global network of interconnected networks. (...) ICC’s Task Force on Internet and Telecoms Infrastructure and Services (ITIS) and ICC’s Commission on E-Business, IT and Telecoms (EBITT) have a strong interest in the growth and stability of the international Internet infrastructure, and has long been convinced that this interest is best served when Internet backbone interconnection agreements are not regulated.
Language:English
Score: 593417 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/fina...bone%20Interconnection2011.pdf
Data Source: un
I N T E R N A T I O N A L T E L E C O M M U N I C A T I O N U N I O NI N T E R N A T I O N A L T E L E C O M M U N I C A T I O N U N I O N E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y This is the Executive Summary of the ITU Internet Reports 2002: Internet for a Mobile Generation, the fourth in the series produced by the ITU Strategy and Policy Unit (SPU). Other publications in the ITU Internet Reports series and the ITU New Initiatives series include: ITU Internet Reports (previously known as Challenges to the Network) ITU Internet Reports, 2001: IP Telephony..................................................................................... 100. (...) ITU INTERNET REPORTS: INTERNET FOR A MOBILE GENERATION Executive Summary September 2002 INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION This Executive Summary gives a brief résumé of the main conclusions of the ITU Internet Reports 2002: Internet for a Mobile Generation.
Language:English
Score: 593403.96 - https://www.itu.int/osg/spu/pu...obileinternet/execsumFinal.pdf
Data Source: un