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SOVEREIGN WEALTH FUNDS INVESTMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SECTORS 1 SOVEREIGN WEALTH FUNDS INVESTMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SECTORS Rajiv Sharma Research Director Global Projects Center, Stanford University sharma10@stanford.edu Executive summary In order for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved, a large amount of long-term investment capital must be deployed into sectors that can help catalyse improvements in areas where need has been iden- tified. (...) There is a large amount of evidence to show that private, alternative investments can lead to wider economic and social benefits to the region. As SOVEREIGN WEALTH FUNDS INVESTMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SECTORS2 mentioned, however, the propensity of SWFs to invest into alternative asset classes will depend greatly on the risk appetite of these investors. (...) This paper looks to address some of these structural issues and identify key areas for overcoming some of these challenges, both from the SWF investor perspective as well SOVEREIGN WEALTH FUNDS INVESTMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SECTORS 3 as the government procurement side.
Language:English
Score: 1618171.9 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/hig...per_Sovereign-Wealth-Funds.pdf
Data Source: un
Objective The side event will engage leading African and global institutional investors (including pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and insurance companies) and African Ministers of Finance and policymakers, to discuss institutional investor- public partnerships (IIPP’s) best practice, to fast track Africa’s Just Transition to Climate Prosperity, and to leverage ‘green’ investments for building more resilient and sustainable economies and societies in post-COVID Africa. (...) The following are the envisaged panelists: y Executive Secretary, ECA, Vera Songwe y CEO, Africa Investor, Hubert Danso y Representatives from selected African and global institutional investors y Selected finance ministers or representatives (TBD) Expected outcomes Raise awareness among representatives of African and global institutional investors about ‘green’ investment opportunities and the financial instruments they can use to invest in renewable energy and industrialization as sustainable means to support African economies and societies recover from the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Target audience The target audience of the meeting include officials of ministries of finance; financial institutions; representatives of African and global pension funds, insurance companies and sovereign wealth funds; private sector development practitioners; and other investors.
Language:English
Score: 1607497.1 - https://www.uneca.org/sites/de.../2021/side-events/E2100407.pdf
Data Source: un
ODA) Households/individuals, e.g.: – Retail investors – High-net-worth individuals – Pensions – Insurance premia Firms (e.g. reserves/retained earnings) Philanthropic institutions or foundations Other institutions with capital reserves (e.g. universities) Governments (e.g. ODA) Households/individuals, e.g.: – Retail investors – High-net-worth individuals – Pensions – Insurance premia Firms (e.g. reserves/retained earnings) Philanthropic institutions or foundations Other institutions with capital reserves (e.g. universities) Banks Pension funds Insurance companies Mutual funds Sovereign wealth funds Endowment funds Private equity Venture capital Impact investors … Banks Pension funds Insurance companies Mutual funds Sovereign wealth funds Endowment funds Private equity Venture capital Impact investors … Financial advisors Wealth managers Investment consultants Financial advisors Wealth managers Investment consultants Equity Corporate debt Sovereign debt Other markets and financial instruments Equity Corporate debt Sovereign debt Other markets and financial instruments Investment banks and brokerage firms Investment banks and brokerage firms Institutional asset managersInstitutional asset managers Rating agencies Rating agencies Principal institutions Intermediaries Advisors Sources of capital Asset pools (or primary intermediaries) Markets Source: UNCTAD. The investment chain and key actors involved 6 The Universe of International Infrastructure Investors is Changing 7 Rising number of private and state- owned TNCs Rising role of TNCs from the South ▪ Especially in ports and telecommunications ▪ Significant in LDCs ▪ Sometimes complementary infrastructure and extractive industries investments Rise of new financiers in infrastructure industries: ▪ Private equity firms ▪ Sovereign wealth funds Rising Chinese and Indian investments in infrastructure in Africa Selected Major TNCs in Infrastructure (Companies from developing economies are in green) 8 Rank Electricity Natural gas Telecommunications Transport Water and sewage More than one infrastructure industry 1 Electricité de France Gaz de France Vodafone Group Grupo Ferrovial Veolia Environnement Suez 2 E.On Spectra Energy Corp.
Language:English
Score: 1531719.9 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...ession-I_James_Zhan_UNCTAD.pdf
Data Source: un
Increased shareholder pay-outs and compensation for executives and directors tied to short-term financial performance has been coupled with cost-cutting and wage stagnation for workers. Investor pressure, especially from hedge funds and private equity firms underlies this trend, though pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, and even union funds are participating in riskier forms of investment in order to meet their commitments to beneficiaries.1 The report concludes that efforts to achieve the widespread implementation of the Guiding Principles throughout the economy will continue to be stymied unless investor respect for human rights is sped and scaled up. The following list is an excerpt of recommendations for (1) States, (2) institutional investors and (3) other actors in the investment ecosystem to advance the investor responsibility to respect human rights over the course of the next decade, and beyond. 1 Source: https://www.hks.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/centers/mrcbg/files/EU%20mHRDD.pdf 5 • Ensure that State institutions dealing with institutional investment have the mandate, skills and resources to promote investor respect for human rights. • Support the creation of guidance for institutional investors, including public pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, development finance institutions, as well as small and medium-sized investment firms, on respecting human rights throughout their investment activities, including on how this relates to fiduciary duties and to broader sustainability and ESG investing. • Support, facilitate and participate in multi-stakeholder platforms to promote dialogue on institutional investment and human rights, analyse ways to address human rights risks in investment activities and strengthen monitoring and accountability. • Develop and implement policies for cross-government alignment of Guiding Principles implementation activities with legislative, regulatory, policy and adjudicative efforts related to institutional investment. • Commit to specific, future-oriented actions to promote respect for human rights among institutional investors and their ecosystem, for example, in national action plans on business and human rights. • Promote policy coherence regarding the human rights responsibilities of investors in the context of State institutions tasked with promoting sustainable economic development. Particular attention should be placed on the role of investors in encouraging companies to carry out human rights due diligence as the first step towards the realisation of the SDGs. • Integrate respect for human rights into the mandate, operations and investment activities of institutions involved in the issuance and management of State pension funds, sovereign wealth bonds and development finance. • Strengthen implementation of relevant legislation and codes, including ESG requirements for asset owners and asset managers, and clarify how these relate to human rights. • Mandate corporate (investee) human rights due diligence in line with the Guiding Principles to support investors’ efforts to assess and address human rights risks in investment portfolios.
Language:English
Score: 1484701.5 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ementation-reader-friendly.pdf
Data Source: un
The extension of the life span of the whole asset – in its operational life or afterwards – will create wealth and public value to the community. Sustainability always makes sense for the environment, society and the economy. and will therefore help to attract investors. The decision to invest in an urban development project does not relate directly to the nature of the investors themselves but rather to the level of risk that the investor finds acceptable. (...) Public investors do not measure success primarily by short-term financial gains.
Language:English
Score: 1456285.1 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...s/files/basic-html/page62.html
Data Source: un
On the other hand, it was mentioned that sovereign wealth funds are generally profit oriented, and are not channeled to areas where the risk/return profile is not favorable. It was pointed out that very few sovereign wealth funds invest directly in long-term investments. (...) It was also noted that the majority of sovereign wealth funds are hosted in developing countries. Some participants suggested that sovereign wealth fund investments are to a greater degree undertaken in the framework of South-South cooperation.
Language:English
Score: 1421597.7 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...ov_PrivFi_Informal-Summary.pdf
Data Source: un
Citing institutional investors, he said they held about $100 trillion in assets globally. (...) Hubert Danso, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of Africa investor (Ai) Group, also Chairman of the African Sovereign Wealth and Pension Fund Leaders Forum, in his remarks said a 5% agenda has been formerly endorsed by the African Union Heads of State and represented a pact between African asset owners, principally pension and sovereign wealth funds and African governments, under a new more aligned institutional investor, public partnership framework. (...) The side event was held under the theme: “Institutional Investors and Green Investments in the Context of COVID-19."
Language:English
Score: 1419564 - https://www.uneca.org/stories/...a-green-recovery-from-covid-19
Data Source: un
Citing institutional investors, he said they held about $100 trillion in assets globally. (...) Hubert Danso, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of Africa investor (Ai) Group, also Chairman of the African Sovereign Wealth and Pension Fund Leaders Forum, in his remarks said a 5% agenda has been formerly endorsed by the African Union Heads of State and represented a pact between African asset owners, principally pension and sovereign wealth funds and African governments, under a new more aligned institutional investor, public partnership framework. (...) The side event was held under the theme: “Institutional Investors and Green Investments in the Context of COVID-19."
Language:English
Score: 1419564 - https://www.uneca.org/node/2596
Data Source: un
Today’s hyperaccumulation of wealth and widening racial wealth gap are also made possible by the very ownership structure of a capitalist enterprise. (...) It is an ownership structure that excels at concentrating wealth in the hands of a few who did not create it. Wealth generated by a business flows to its owners.
Language:English
Score: 1399598.4 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...files/2022-05/Omar_Freilla.pdf
Data Source: un
The right of peoples and nations to permanent sovereignty over their natural wealth and resources must be exercised in the interest of their national development and of the well-being of the people of the State concerned. 2. (...) The profits derived must be shared in the proportions freely agreed upon, in each case, between the investors and the recipient State, due care being taken to ensure that there is no impairment, for any reason, of that State's sovereignty over its natural wealth and resources. 4. (...) International co-operation for the economic development of developing countries, whether in the form of public or private capital investments, exchange of goods and services, technical assistance, or exchange of scientific information, shall be such as to further their independent national development and shall be based upon respect for their sovereignty over their natural wealth and resources. 7. Violation of the rights of peoples and nations to sovereignty over their natural wealth and resources is contrary to the spirit and principles of the Charter of the United Nations and hinders the development of international co-operation and the maintenance of peace. 8.
Language:English
Score: 1389808.8 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...essionalInterest/resources.pdf
Data Source: un