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This presentation does not purport to contain all the information a person may require in relation to its content matter. Prospective investors are not to construe the contents of this model as legal, tax, investment, financial or other advice. Each prospective investor should consult its own advisers as to the legal, business, tax and other related matters concerning any investment. (...) Our clients are institutional investors including pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, and development finance institutions.
Language:English
Score: 1294774.8 - https://www.fao.org/forestry/5...dd404b423b9d139ba7dc47e6ea.pdf
Data Source: un
Xcapit (Argentina)  Xcapit is building a platform that increases safe, easy access to financial services, including financial planning, gamified savings, and wealth management tools.   The team has developed and launched their crypto wallet, which has been downloaded by almost 13,000 users across 50 countries.   The team is currently developing a wealth management investment planner and investment product support.   Xcapit has raised USD $1M from 3rd party investors.  Read more about Xcapit here .   Xcapit has launched a fundraising round and is looking to collaborate with investors to further scale their solution.  
Language:English
Score: 1293479.1 - https://www.unicef.org/innovat...-fund-blockchain-cohort-update
Data Source: un
Thus, if development is to be measured in terms of income and wealth, the Asia region faces a mammoth challenge. In a recent case in point, Credit Suisse’s Global Wealth Databank 2018i reportedly ranked Thailand as the world’s most unequal country in terms of wealth distribution, followed by India and Russia. By the year, the richest 1% Thais owned 66.9% of the country’s wealth compared to 58% in 2016. Despite increased wealth due to rapid economic growth, distribution remains vastly unequal and perpetuates an elite-ruling society in Thailand.
Language:English
Score: 1292439.5 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...Bangkok/ManushyaFoundation.pdf
Data Source: un
This event will be an open forum for the best ideas to finance development, including:  Moving beyond aid: cost-neutral, development-friendly policy reforms by rich countries across a range of areas including trade, migration and transparency  Large assets such as sovereign wealth funds and pension funds as development investors  Private sector interventions in achieving basic health coverage - what works  Improving the investment climate in developing countries  Public money as a lever to crowd-in private investment Featured speakers include:  Sir Suma Chakrabarti, President, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development  Elizabeth Littlefield, President & CEO, Overseas Private Investment Corporation  Owen Barder, Director & Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development Europe  Tomicah Tilleman, Director, Bretton Woods II Initiative, New America Foundation  Gugulethu Ndebele, CEO, Save the Children – South Africa  Rajesh Mirchandani (moderator), Senior Director of Communications and Policy Outreach, Center for Global Development Attendees will also be invited to share additional ideas and case studies for discussion.
Language:English
Score: 1291417 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/ffd...15/10/Addis-Flyer-v7-Final.pdf
Data Source: un
Bottom line, unless the investors behind the FDI are Impact Investors, or Social Investors, where the goal is to both make a return on capital while positively affecting the holistic food value chain, it is very difficult to achieve this “human rights” and “positive local citizenship” goal. (...) Currently, there are FDI investors from China, India, and the Mideast who are seeking as much farmland as possible in order to produce food solely for export to their home markets.  (...) This issue of sustainability and good local citizenship is going to become even more important as countries with large wealth funds and foreign currency reserves seek to acquire land resources in Africa primary to secure scarce African farmland resources. 
Language:English
Score: 1289747.9 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ar/comment/6050
Data Source: un
Bottom line, unless the investors behind the FDI are Impact Investors, or Social Investors, where the goal is to both make a return on capital while positively affecting the holistic food value chain, it is very difficult to achieve this “human rights” and “positive local citizenship” goal. (...) Currently, there are FDI investors from China, India, and the Mideast who are seeking as much farmland as possible in order to produce food solely for export to their home markets.  (...) This issue of sustainability and good local citizenship is going to become even more important as countries with large wealth funds and foreign currency reserves seek to acquire land resources in Africa primary to secure scarce African farmland resources. 
Language:English
Score: 1289747.9 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/ar/comment/6050
Data Source: un
Bottom line, unless the investors behind the FDI are Impact Investors, or Social Investors, where the goal is to both make a return on capital while positively affecting the holistic food value chain, it is very difficult to achieve this “human rights” and “positive local citizenship” goal. (...) Currently, there are FDI investors from China, India, and the Mideast who are seeking as much farmland as possible in order to produce food solely for export to their home markets.  (...) This issue of sustainability and good local citizenship is going to become even more important as countries with large wealth funds and foreign currency reserves seek to acquire land resources in Africa primary to secure scarce African farmland resources. 
Language:English
Score: 1289747.9 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/comment/6050
Data Source: un
Bottom line, unless the investors behind the FDI are Impact Investors, or Social Investors, where the goal is to both make a return on capital while positively affecting the holistic food value chain, it is very difficult to achieve this “human rights” and “positive local citizenship” goal. (...) Currently, there are FDI investors from China, India, and the Mideast who are seeking as much farmland as possible in order to produce food solely for export to their home markets.  (...) This issue of sustainability and good local citizenship is going to become even more important as countries with large wealth funds and foreign currency reserves seek to acquire land resources in Africa primary to secure scarce African farmland resources. 
Language:English
Score: 1289747.9 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/comment/6050
Data Source: un
STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY CONVENTION OF INDEPENDENT FINANCIAL ADVISORS
CIFA with its core principles of defending the investor’s rights is the only NGO addressing poverty and all the segments of the economy, be it developed, in development or not developed, in a constructive, wealth creating sustainable approach. (...) CIFA understands that the SDGs can only be achieved if there is sufficient wealth creation to finance them. CIFA is the defender of the idea to create an appropriate economic environment that will encourage such new wealth creation. (...) When a positive environment for wealth creation is in place, it fosters more inclusive economic growth.
Language:English
Score: 1234489.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=E/2017/NGO/6&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON ADEQUATE HOUSING AS A COMPONENT OF THE RIGHT TO AN ADEQUATE STANDARD OF LIVING, AND ON THE RIGHT TO NON-DISCRIMINATION IN THIS CONTEXT : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
The Special Rapporteur suggests that, as a way forward, States must redefine their relationship with private investors and international financial institutions, and reform the governance of financial markets so that, rather than treating housing as a commodity valued primarily as an asset for the accumulation of wealth they reclaim housing as a social good, and thus ensure the human right to a place to live in security and dignity. (...) When rented homes or mortgages are owned by remote investors, money mostly flows out of communities and simply creates greater global concentration of wealth. (...) In contemporary Chile, the appropriation of land by large scale investors and speculators, accumulating land and luxury properties, has meant that inner-city redevelopment has displaced many traditional residents, exemplifying “the intertwined roles of the state and assorted holders of economic capital in the production, distribution and representation of urban exclusion and segregation”.42 36 Knight Frank Research, “The Wealth Report 2016: the global perspective on prime property and investment”, p. 13.
Language:English
Score: 1207572.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/34/51&Lang=E
Data Source: ods