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Following the tractor trail… Increase in the rate of Imports of agricultural machinery into developing and transition economies, 2003-2010 Sample selection → Structured, quota-based sample selection, drawing from a larger population of investors. → A balanced mix of investors based on a number of salient variables, including the size of investors, coverage of different business models and value chains, inclusion of different types of companies and funds, coverage of key home and host countries (including investors from developed and developing economies) etc. (...) Inter-Agency Working Group: FAO, IFAD, UNCTAD and the World Bank Methodology → Each visit to an investment project and communities lasts around 3-4 days, divided roughly 50:50 between the investor and other local stakeholders. → Detailed, semi-structured questionnaire research instrument for investors. Quantitative data on operations and qualitative information relating to the principles. → Open-ended, “critical incidents” research instrument for other stakeholders affected by the investment. → Research instruments were field-tested and subsequently refined. → Use of advanced statistical and qualitative analysis with software packages. → Collection and incorporation of a wealth of material provided by investors and others (concession agreements, impact assessments, consultation processes etc,).
Language:English
Score: 1243374 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...s39_rai/Field_testing_PRAI.pdf
Data Source: un
Thus, to the extent that increases in households’ marketable financial assets augment the wealth effect, its influence in amplifying booms and downturns grows. 14 The most visible examples were funds in the Netherlands and the defined benefit plans of automobile manufacturers in the U.S. (...) In the U.S., the bubble in stock prices accounted for a phenomenal 71 percent rise in households’ net worth and an 86 percent increase in the value of pension fund reserves between 1994 and 1999, constituting a “wealth effect” that contributed to rising consumption and declining personal saving. (...) While the percentage losses were small relative to previous gains, the IMF reported that the retreat in equity prices had produced a negative wealth effect equal to 70 percent of households’ disposable income (IMF 2002).
Language:English
Score: 1238262.7 - https://www.un.org/development...apers/bp_wess2007_jdarista.pdf
Data Source: un
STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY CONVENTION OF INDEPENDENT FINANCIAL ADVISORS
CIFA with its core principles of defending the investor’s rights is the only NGO addressing poverty and all the segments of the economy, be it developed, in development or not developed, in a constructive, wealth creating sustainable approach. (...) CIFA understands that the SDGs can only be achieved if there is sufficient wealth creation to finance them. CIFA is the defender of the idea to create an appropriate economic environment that will encourage such new wealth creation. (...) When a positive environment for wealth creation is in place, it fosters more inclusive economic growth.
Language:English
Score: 1234688.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=E/2017/NGO/6&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Closing Africa’s wealth gap | Africa Renewal Skip to main content   Welcome to the United Nations Toggle navigation Language: English Français 中文 Africa Renewal Africa Renewal Toggle navigation e-Magazine Stories Topics Climate Change Culture and Education Economic Development Gender Health Human Rights Peace and Security Sustainable Development Goals Youth - Sports Book Review Digital Digital Refugees & Migrants Sports UN Affairs Podcast Search form Search Campaign Closing Africa’s wealth gap Get monthly e-newsletter Reducing inequalities Closing Africa’s wealth gap Economists call for new approach to planting, nurturing seeds of equity From Africa Renewal:  December 2017 - March 2018 By:  Kingsley Ighobor Photo: AMO/ Esa Alexander South African youths protest outside the Cape Town Convention Centre against inequalities. (...) But a new report from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) finds that Africa’s new wealth is increasingly concentrated in a few hands. (...) Economic inequality, sometimes referred to as income inequality, is the unequal distribution of a country’s wealth. In highly unequal societies, such as South Africa, most people live in poverty while a minority amasses enormous wealth.
Language:English
Score: 1229350.9 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...ng-africa%E2%80%99s-wealth-gap
Data Source: un
The specific objectives of the Forum are to: (a) Discuss and present recommendations on traditional and innovative strategies to broaden the national tax base and better utilize domestic streams of capital to achieve socioeconomic transformation in Africa; (b) Suggest measures to address regulatory and institutional issues affecting the mobilization of domestic resources in Africa; (c) Deliberate on the challenges that the mismanagement and misunderstanding of illicit financial flows pose to Africa’s development, and offer alternatives that can best support the financing of the continent; (d) Identify priority actions and mechanisms for better and transparent harnessing of natural resource revenue for development; (e) Discuss the role of the public sector in promoting private equity investments and private sector financing, and explore the barriers to successful public-private partnerships for finance and capacity development in Africa; (f) Make suggestions on sovereign wealth fund strategies for resource mobilization, through feasible and plausible schemes such as sovereign wealth enterprises and the Strategic Development Sovereign Wealth Fund; (g) Develop policy options to improve Africa’s access to global climate finance and capitalize on innovative domestic climate finance opportunities; (h) Identify the roles of various stakeholders for best practices in mobilizing resources within the continent. (...) This includes curtailing illicit financial flows and establishing institutional capacity to tap into more innovative sources of financing, such as public-private partnerships, sovereign wealth funds and diaspora bonds. 23. The Forum will discuss: (a) Tax-based expansion strategies, including the potential contribution by the informal sector, reducing tax exemptions or tax holidays for foreign investors, and tackling constraints to implementing policy; (b) Design and implementation of appropriate national policies to encourage the development of innovative financial services for low-income populations, reduce excess liquidity in the intermediary sector and improve access and cost of credit, particularly for small and medium enterprises; (c) The challenges to establishing well-functioning capital markets; identification, funding and implementation of corrective actions to overcome these barriers; and steps to establishing the regulatory and legal framework for using capital markets as a means of mobilizing resources for productive investments; (d) Strategies African countries could adopt to better utilize innovative domestic sources of finance, such as public-private partnerships, sovereign wealth funds and diaspora bonds as solutions to potential implementation issues. (...) Africa’s growth story is attracting the global investment community as investors continue to search for growth markets with attractive rates of return.
Language:English
Score: 1226386.4 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...eetingdocument/wcms_310407.pdf
Data Source: un
A look at land use data in Africa According to data from the Land Matrix, there are considerable differences in terms of scale, intent and investors in land use. More than15 million ha are allocated to agriculture. (...) Africa land use situation Size ( ha) Average size per contract (ha) • Multinational investors have acquired 459 individual projects that cover more than 10 million hectares of agricultural land in Africa since the year 2000. • The action of multinational investors responds to the strategy of states of attraction of FDI • National investors (middle class and political elites) also contribute to the growing demand for land covering an area of ​​2.3 million hectares • Most of the land targeted by investors is fertile land or old cropland or forest (Decommissioned Forest Concessions due to degradation). • This implies strong competition between commercial interests, local livelihoods and the preservation of ecosystem services. 4. Constraints to the emergence of the wood-products bio-economy in Africa. • Tensions in land use and the risks of vulnerability implied to ecosystems are warning signs of the constraints to the development of the Bio-economy in Africa. • For the time being, the Bioeconomy started with the leadership of sub-regional partnerships and the support of international donors institutions. • Each country in Eastern and Western Africa has its own strategic focus : bioenergy, biotechnology etc. • However, in the COMIFAC countries, the strategies for economic diversification does not refer explicitly to the bio-based products. • Thus, land allocations are not clearly indexed to the development of bio-economy. • The absence of an enabling environment often undermines the sustainable land uses and investments and productionsthe • Because a huge part of population consider decision-makers without anly legitimacy. • This leads to a latent crisis of populations that at best do not perform or clumsily perform the tasks entrusted to them, and at worst do not involve in the government project. • Because of the widening wealth inequalities between political leaders, and the rest of the population, political action is seen as a business and not an action in the service of the general interest. • The lack of a clearly « Bio-economy » oriented strategy . • The central african countries are still struggling for further processing of wood.
Language:English
Score: 1226029.9 - https://www.fao.org/forestry/4...12ae5c8cb1d3a020513a297ccd.pdf
Data Source: un
Nature-Climate Solutions and carbon finance has also been recognized as a driving force to boost forest-based industries engagement in ecosystem restoration, at the condition that more clarity and certainty is built in for investors and companies. Ms Radha Kuppalli, New Forests, emphasized that a “a critical mass of investors, companies, NGOs and governments must coalesce around standards for forestry and land use carbon projects that will support higher levels of pricing particularly for biodiversity conservation and restoration”. (...) Important initiatives such as the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) and the Task Force on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD) could make a difference if adequately embedded in a majority of companies and investors. These may be opportunities for organizations like FAO to work with countries to promote regulation and disclosure frameworks at the asset and company-level. (...) Indeed the forest sector can contribute to this transition through the wealth of forest products – both goods and services, they provide.
Language:English
Score: 1226029.9 - https://www.fao.org/forestry/industries/98446/en/
Data Source: un
APWLD calls this alternative framework Development Justice,5 and it is framed by five foundational shifts as follows: Redistributive justice, aiming to redistribute resources, wealth, power and opportunities to all human beings equitably. This necessitates dismantling existing systems that channel resources and wealth from developing countries to wealthy countries, from people to corporations and the military. (...) IV Economic reform and tax Oxfam’s latest study finds that in 2017, eight men own the same wealth as the poorest half of the world’s population.6 Among the many contributing factors to this imbalance is a flawed and opaque finance system that allows the private sector to retain at least US$30 trillion in tax havens and unnamed bank accounts.
Language:English
Score: 1225350.2 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...bt/impactassessments/APWLD.pdf
Data Source: un
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON ADEQUATE HOUSING AS A COMPONENT OF THE RIGHT TO AN ADEQUATE STANDARD OF LIVING, AND ON THE RIGHT TO NON-DISCRIMINATION IN THIS CONTEXT : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
The Special Rapporteur suggests that, as a way forward, States must redefine their relationship with private investors and international financial institutions, and reform the governance of financial markets so that, rather than treating housing as a commodity valued primarily as an asset for the accumulation of wealth they reclaim housing as a social good, and thus ensure the human right to a place to live in security and dignity. (...) When rented homes or mortgages are owned by remote investors, money mostly flows out of communities and simply creates greater global concentration of wealth. (...) In contemporary Chile, the appropriation of land by large scale investors and speculators, accumulating land and luxury properties, has meant that inner-city redevelopment has displaced many traditional residents, exemplifying “the intertwined roles of the state and assorted holders of economic capital in the production, distribution and representation of urban exclusion and segregation”.42 36 Knight Frank Research, “The Wealth Report 2016: the global perspective on prime property and investment”, p. 13.
Language:English
Score: 1207599 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/34/51&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY CONVENTION OF INDEPENDENT FINANCIAL ADVISORS
Economic growth, investment and entrepreneurship as engines of resilience and sustainability: Practical policies to shift from poverty eradication to wealth creation: CIFA views financial markets as critical players in the global effort to fight poverty. (...) In this regard, CIFA will continue to actively partner with and support the work of the United Nations, raise awareness among its membership of the 2030 Agend a, and identify areas where its work can be leveraged to accelerate progress on the Sustainable Development Goals by helping to lift people everywhere out of poverty and into wealth. CIFA’s activities will continue to focus on strengthening mutual trust among the general public, Governments and investors, and advocating for the highest ethical standards and professional practices in the investment industry. (...) The “city” is also the place where great wealth and crushing poverty exist side by side.
Language:English
Score: 1179344.5 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=E/2018/NGO/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods