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STANDARD OF ACCOMMODATION, TRAVEL TIME AND REST STOPOVERS / FROM THE UNDER-SECRETARY-GENERAL FOR ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT
ST/AI/249/Rev.3/Amend.3 Page 4 A B C Journeys Travel time involving Rest (days) for home flying time stopovers leave and family Country and city exceeding 9 hours (days) visit travel Ethiopia (Addis Ababa) ....... (...) ST/AI/249/Rev.3/Amend.3 Page 5 A B C Journeys Travel time involving Rest (days) for home flying time stopovers leave and family Country and city exceeding 9 hours (days) visit travel Japan (Tokyo) ................ (...) ST/AI/249/Rev.3/Amend.3 Page 6 A B C Journeys Travel time involving Rest (days) for home flying time stopovers leave and family Country and city exceeding 9 hours (days) visit travel Mongolia (Ulan Bator) ........
Language:English
Score: 722879.15 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ST/AI/249/REV.3/AMEND.3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
REVISED DRAFT RESOLUTION ON THE DEPLOYMENT OF HIGHLY AND FULLY AUTOMATED VEHICLES IN ROAD TRAFFIC
The system is the fall back (without the need for human intervention to ensure road traffic safety), for which the system is a fall back, for some or all of a journey (without any expectation that a user will respond to a request to intervene) (b) Automated driving system means the combination of hardware and software that exercises dynamic control of a vehicle on a sustained basis. (...) Users of automated driving systems in highly and fully automated vehicles, depending on the functionalities offered by the system, should: - Be aware/informed of the proper use of the vehicle prior to starting the journey [accepted]. - Be able to communicate with the systems or Alternative - [Possess the necessary capability to use the vehicle including being able to communicate with it] - Be able to follow the procedures for safe use of the vehicle [accepted] - Comply with traffic rules pertaining to users of the vehicle including, when appropriate, those applying to users exercising dynamic control such as holding a driving permit for part of a journey /or - Be aware/informed when the vehicle leaves its operational design domain Be able to, and hold the necessary driving permits, to exercise dynamic control so as to begin or complete a journey where the automated driving system is only engaged for some of the journey, unless another user does so (...) (Comment: to be further developed on whether this recommendation should refer to functionalities or rather continuation of a journey as a driver). VI. Further recommendations Comment: WP.1 has not agreed yet on any recommendation under this section.
Language:English
Score: 722879.15 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...TRANS/WP.1/2018/4/REV.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
STANDARDS OF ACCOMMODATION FOR AIR TRAVEL : REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
A/C. 5/42/9 EI\9Uah 'age 2 No. of journeys Total COf$t of travel Ca) Delegation travell ~orty-fir8c 8ession 106 ! (...) I Includes only journeys of delegations whoae claims have been SUbmitted to date. 4. The figures on the cost of travel repol~ted in the above tables in respect of other non-Secretariat officials and Secretoriat officials represent those journeys that were either entirely by first-class or only partially by first-class because one or more legs of the journey involved flights of less than nine hours.
Language:English
Score: 722879.15 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce.../get?open&DS=A/C.5/42/9&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The workshop also introduced the concept of “lead users,” and “journey mapping.” Participants first identified their “lead users”, in this case, lead users were specific migrant children whose journeys they wanted to explore.   (...) Bianca Nasser Team members explaining their journey map Bianca Nasser Elena Cullen demonstrating how to use design as tools for fostering and facilitating conversations.     (...) Learn more here:   unicef.org/mexico/spanish/ Sean Donahue A detail of one journey map showing the natural and human dangers of traveling for migrant children (rivers and coyotes).
Language:English
Score: 722606.1 - https://www.unicef.org/innovat...echnology-for-migrant-children
Data Source: un
Deadly journeys through Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea threaten 'tragic and fatal consequences' “Left Adrift at Sea: Dangerous Journeys of Refugees Across the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea” describes how over the last year, the  COVID-19 pandemic  has exacerbated the situation, prompting many States in Southeast Asia to tighten their borders.  (...) According to the report, these dangerous journeys began “in Myanmar, where the Rohingya were stripped of their citizenship and denied basic rights”. (...) This means that journeys were eight times deadlier last year than those in 2019.  
Language:English
Score: 722606.1 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/08/1098122
Data Source: un
The Journey to Yemen In February 2019, together with three boys from the village, Lemlem set on a journey to Saudi Arabia through Afar, Djibouti, and Yemen. (...) To raise funds for the rest of the journey, Lemlem and her friends found work on a commercial farm. (...) Their arrest spelt the end of the journey. The four were detained in a stadium in Aden for three months as they awaited humanitarian assistance.
Language:English
Score: 722606.1 - https://www.unicef.org/ethiopi...life-turns-frightening-journey
Data Source: un
United Nations EC
In Article 3 of the ATP it is stated "In the case of carriage entailing one or more sea crossings other than sea crossings as referred to in paragraph 2 of this article, each land journey shall be considered separately". Sea crossings "other than sea crossings as referred to in paragraph 2 of this article" mean sea crossings which are at least 150 km long. 2 ECE/TRANS/WP.11/2011/2 12. (...) The total length of such a journey could be more than 3 000 km and it might last more than four days, but because of the present "150 km rule", using ATP equipment would not be required. (...) In the case of carriage entailing one or more sea crossings other than sea crossings as referred to in paragraph 2 of this article, each land journey shall be considered separately. 2. The provisions of paragraph 1 of this article shall likewise apply to sea crossings of less than 150 km and carriage by inland waterways on condition that the goods are shipped in equipment used for the land journey or journeys without transloading of the goods and that such sea crossings or carriage by inland waterways precede or follow one or more national land journeys as referred to in paragraph 1 of this article or take place between two such land journeys. 3.
Language:English
Score: 722510.25 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...=ECE/TRANS/WP.11/2011/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
REVISED MODE AND STANDARDS OF TRAVEL
As a general rule such approved. travel time, not eounted as annual leave, is deemed to include the time reQuired for any additional journey within the home countr·y, to or frcm the place of home leave as established under rule 105 . .3 (d). (...) ;:en at the end of the :)i1' portion of a journey while awaiting onward transportation by anuther mode of 1:rr.n:;;porta tion. (...) 1cny er tcurist class e1:all norr::ally be authorized after an initial flight of feur hcul"s or r;:cre) subject to such considerations as available accommodaticJn, onward transpurtation facilities, duration of the next leg of the journey and airlines I time-tables. A maximum of two days of authorized stopover time may be taken in anyone lilace
Language:English
Score: 722510.25 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...open&DS=ST/AI/150/ADD.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
REPORT OF THE OFFICER-IN-CHARGE OF THE UNITED NATIONS OPERATION IN THE CONGO TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ON DEVELOPMENTS RELATING TO THE APPLICATION OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS OF 21 FEBRUARY AND 24 NOVEMBER 1961 : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Tshcmbe's verbal request, the Officer-in-Charge confirms that these guarantees are valid for the whole period of the visit and for the journey of the President and his party to and from Leopoldville. (...) Tshombe would be valid for the whole period of his visit to Leopoldville and for his journey to and from Leopoldville. In accordance with the wish expressed by :v~. (...) Md.9 English Page 9 of course ado-pt the same attitude in connexion with your forthcoming journey to ~vl~-;.lle, where according to ~70ur note ve:r1ale, you intend to arrive by 15 March 1962 at the latest.
Language:English
Score: 722510.25 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...et?open&DS=S/5053/ADD.9&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Section 3 – Overview of Digital Health Platform Development Applying your eHealth Strategy and digital health interventions to DHP development Importance of considering external application and system design when planning the DHP Summary of the DHP infostructure development process Specific DHP development tasks and recommended approach for completing them Section 4 – Context Analysis Introduction to context analysis Broad health system overview Stakeholder analysis Digital health technology inventory Health system business process mapping Collaborative Requirements Development Methodology Section 5 – Digital Health Platform Design Establish DHP design principles Define a set of design principles for your DHP Validate principles Adhere to principles throughout DHP implementation Outline the enterprise architecture Different enterprise architecture frameworks Different architecture views within the DHP Process for outlining an enterprise architecture for the DHP Considerations when defining an enterprise architecture for the DHP Identify DHP components Common DHP components Application of DHP components in health domains Sample architecture for a DHP Process for identifying DHP components Write up your use case as a health journey and identify the digital health moments Match DHP functionality and components to the health journey steps Adopt and Deploy Standards Sources of standards for the DHP Types of standards Process for adding standards to the DHP design Develop a high-level standards strategy with stakeholders Publish standards and interface specifications once validated Additional guidance to consider for standards selection Section 6 – Digital Health Platform Implementation Approaches to DHP implementation Potential DHP implementation paths Guidance on DHP implementation Using maturity models to guide DHP development Select software for your DHP Establish the governance framework Institutionalize the DHP Awareness raising and capacity building Acronyms and Abbreviations Used Appendix A – Case Studies Liberia case study Estonia case study Canada case study India case study Norway case study Appendix B – How Health Sector Domains Use Common DHP Components Appendix C – Identifying Pain Points and Possible Solutions during Business Process Mapping Appendix D – Health Journeys Background on pregnant mother health journey Diagrams for pregnant mother health journey DHP solutions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease health journey: comprehensive version Appendix E – Maturity Models Canada Health Infoway maturity model MEASURE interoperability maturity model Appendix F – Description of Common Standards Used Units of measure Formats of health base data standards Health workflow standards Personal health device standards Appendix G – Data Protection Measures Appendix H – Internet of Things Uses of the Internet of things in health care Core principles Appendix I – Organizational Resources for DHP Implementers Digital health standards developing organizations Communities of practice List of acronyms and abbreviations
Language:English
Score: 721856.1 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it...E_HEALTH.10-2020-TOC-HTM-E.htm
Data Source: un