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Find out about the hazards and risks of lead and, in particular, of lead paint from the following resources: Lead poisoning and health: Key facts Exposure to lead: a major public health concern (for decision makers) Question & Answers: Lead and lead paint JOIN the Action Join the global movement by taking action to prevent lead poisoning, particularly in children.  (...) Campaign materials Lead Paint Campaign Support Resources ELIMINATE Lead Paint Work with governments and stakeholders to establish laws eliminating lead paint, and ensuring effective enforcement of lead paint regulations. Use the resources below to find guidance and technical materials to support lead paint regulation. Suggested steps to establish lead paint laws Lead paint policy making resources Find out the status of lead paint laws in your country Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead Paint Videos 29 October 2020 Q&As on lead poisoning with Carolyn Vickers, Unit head, Chemical Safety and Health 27 September 2020 It is time to ban lead paint 10 June 2020 Four things you should know about lead Q&As on lead poisoning with Carolyn Vickers, Unit Head, Chemical Safety and Health Video statement Dr Maria Neira, WHO Director, Department of Environment, Climate Change and Health Other languages French  |  Spanish Four things you should know about lead Video animation explaining why lead and, in particular, lead paint is a harmful to children and the need for countries to take action to stop this source of exposure.
Language:English
Score: 461873.2 - https://www.who.int/campaigns/...oisoning-prevention-week/2020/
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - Lead in Toys note 6 Aug.doc LEAD EXPOSURE IN CHILDREN Information note - 6 August 2007 Lead is a heavy metal with toxic properties, especially for children. Lead may enter the environment through various sources, such as leaded petrol (in countries where this type of fuel is still available), glazed ceramics, leaded pipes, recycling of car batteries, smelters, certain toys and trinkets and leaded paint, among many other sources. (...) Problems may be posed by lead in products that are currently available in a child's environment, such as the dust in homes with leaded paint or certain toys that are either made out of lead (e.g. play jewellery, trinkets) or contain lead (e.g. some plastics or paints).
Language:English
Score: 461445.5 - https://www.who.int/phe/news/Lead_in_Toys_note_060807.pdf
Data Source: un
Lead is everywhere Children can be exposed to lead in various places. (...) Lead affects children more than adults The potential negative effects of lead are far greater for children than for adults. (...) UNICEF Eight-year-old Anik’s proximity to a toxic lead factory was life-changing. Since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and gradually of lead-based paint, blood lead levels have declined dramatically in high-income countries.
Language:English
Score: 460984.77 - https://www.unicef.org/stories...hings-know-about-lead-exposure
Data Source: un
The report notes that informal and substandard recycling of lead-acid batteries is a leading contributor to lead poisoning in children living in low and middle-income countries, which have experienced a three-fold increase in the number of vehicles since 2000. (...) Often, the workers and the exposed community are not aware that lead is a potent neurotoxin. Other sources of childhood lead exposure include lead in water from the use of leaded pipes; lead from active industry, such as mining and battery recycling; lead-based paint and pigments; leaded gasoline, which has declined considerably in recent decades, but was a major historical source; lead solder in food cans; and lead in spices, cosmetics, ayurvedic medicines, toys and other consumer products. (...) The return on the investment is enormous: improved health, increased productivity, higher IQs, less violence, and brighter futures for millions of children across the planet. ” While blood lead levels have declined dramatically in most high-income countries since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and most lead-based paints, blood lead levels for children in low- and middle-income countries have remained elevated and, in many cases, dangerously high even a decade after the global phase-out of leaded gasolines.
Language:English
Score: 460906.05 - https://www.unicef.org/rosa/pr...w-groundbreaking-analysis-says
Data Source: un
The report notes that informal and substandard recycling of lead-acid batteries is a leading contributor to lead poisoning in children living in low and middle-income countries, which have experienced a three-fold increase in the number of vehicles since 2000. (...) Often, the workers and the exposed community are not aware that lead is a potent neurotoxin. Other sources of childhood lead exposure include lead in water from the use of leaded pipes; lead from active industry, such as mining and battery recycling; lead-based paint and pigments; leaded gasoline, which has declined considerably in recent decades, but was a major historical source; lead solder in food cans; and lead in spices, cosmetics, ayurvedic medicines, toys and other consumer products. (...) The return on the investment is enormous: improved health, increased productivity, higher IQs, less violence, and brighter futures for millions of children across the planet. ” While blood lead levels have declined dramatically in most high-income countries since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and most lead-based paints, blood lead levels for children in low- and middle-income countries have remained elevated and, in many cases, dangerously high even a decade after the global phase-out of leaded gasolines.
Language:English
Score: 460906.05 - https://www.unicef.org/armenia...w-groundbreaking-analysis-says
Data Source: un
Circulated the first drafts of the interim scientific reviews on lead and cadmium for review and comments to members of the Working Group on Lead and Cadmium (March – June 2008). (...) Rivers can transport lead on a national and regional scale, and oceans are also a transport medium. · Use - Lead is used and traded globally as a metal in various products. The major use of lead in recent years is lead batteries, however other uses include plastics, paints, electronic equipment and certain toys.
Language:English
Score: 460860 - https://www.who.int/ifcs/docum.../forums/forum6/f6_12inf.en.doc
Data Source: un
The report notes that informal and substandard recycling of lead-acid batteries is a leading contributor to lead poisoning in children living in low and middle-income countries, which have experienced a three-fold increase in the number of vehicles since 2000. (...) Often, the workers and the exposed community are not aware that lead is a potent neurotoxin. Other sources of childhood lead exposure include lead in water from the use of leaded pipes; lead from active industry, such as mining and battery recycling; lead-based paint and pigments; leaded gasoline, which has declined considerably in recent decades, but was a major historical source; lead solder in food cans; and lead in spices, cosmetics, ayurvedic medicines, toys and other consumer products. (...) The return on the investment is enormous: improved health, increased productivity, higher IQs, less violence, and brighter futures for millions of children across the planet. ” While blood lead levels have declined dramatically in most high-income countries since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and most lead-based paints, blood lead levels for children in low- and middle-income countries have remained elevated and, in many cases, dangerously high even a decade after the global phase-out of leaded gasolines.
Language:English
Score: 460837.9 - https://www.unicef.org/ghana/p...w-groundbreaking-analysis-says
Data Source: un
The report notes that informal and substandard recycling of lead-acid batteries is a leading contributor to lead poisoning in children living in low and middle-income countries, which have experienced a three-fold increase in the number of vehicles since 2000. (...) Often, the workers and the exposed community are not aware that lead is a potent neurotoxin. Other sources of childhood lead exposure include lead in water from the use of leaded pipes; lead from active industry, such as mining and battery recycling; lead-based paint and pigments; leaded gasoline, which has declined considerably in recent decades, but was a major historical source; lead solder in food cans; and lead in spices, cosmetics, ayurvedic medicines, toys and other consumer products. (...) The return on the investment is enormous: improved health, increased productivity, higher IQs, less violence, and brighter futures for millions of children across the planet. ” While blood lead levels have declined dramatically in most high-income countries since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and most lead-based paints, blood lead levels for children in low- and middle-income countries have remained elevated and, in many cases, dangerously high even a decade after the global phase-out of leaded gasolines.
Language:English
Score: 460611.96 - https://www.unicef.org/turkiye...w-groundbreaking-analysis-says
Data Source: un
The report notes that informal and substandard recycling of lead-acid batteries is a leading contributor to lead poisoning in children living in low and middle-income countries, which have experienced a three-fold increase in the number of vehicles since 2000. (...) Often, the workers and the exposed community are not aware that lead is a potent neurotoxin. Other sources of childhood lead exposure include lead in water from the use of leaded pipes; lead from active industry, such as mining and battery recycling; lead-based paint and pigments; leaded gasoline, which has declined considerably in recent decades, but was a major historical source; lead solder in food cans; and lead in spices, cosmetics, ayurvedic medicines, toys and other consumer products. (...) The return on the investment is enormous: improved health, increased productivity, higher IQs, less violence, and brighter futures for millions of children across the planet. ” While blood lead levels have declined dramatically in most high-income countries since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and most lead-based paints, blood lead levels for children in low- and middle-income countries have remained elevated and, in many cases, dangerously high even a decade after the global phase-out of leaded gasolines.
Language:English
Score: 460611.96 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/...w-groundbreaking-analysis-says
Data Source: un
The report notes that informal and substandard recycling of lead-acid batteries is a leading contributor to lead poisoning in children living in low and middle-income countries, which have experienced a three-fold increase in the number of vehicles since 2000. (...) Often, the workers and the exposed community are not aware that lead is a potent neurotoxin. Other sources of childhood lead exposure include lead in water from the use of leaded pipes; lead from active industry, such as mining and battery recycling; lead-based paint and pigments; leaded gasoline, which has declined considerably in recent decades, but was a major historical source; lead solder in food cans; and lead in spices, cosmetics, ayurvedic medicines, toys and other consumer products. (...) The return on the investment is enormous: improved health, increased productivity, higher IQs, less violence, and brighter futures for millions of children across the planet. ” While blood lead levels have declined dramatically in most high-income countries since the phase-out of leaded gasoline and most lead-based paints, blood lead levels for children in low- and middle-income countries have remained elevated and, in many cases, dangerously high even a decade after the global phase-out of leaded gasolines.
Language:English
Score: 460557.23 - https://www.unicef.org/zimbabw...w-groundbreaking-analysis-says
Data Source: un