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Approach - The " One Health " approach will be used in which there is a close cooperation between the veterinary sector with other sectors such as health, market management, custom, border defense force, police, local authorities and international organizations to implement the most effective and comprehensive measures to ensure achievement of the designed objectives. (...) Organize technical training for local animal health system. - Regularly clean, sterilize and decontaminate high-risked areas, especially live bird markets. (...) Department of Animal Health - Work closely with the Department of Animal Health to produce messages to communicate about avian influenza and get directly involved in media and communication activities. - Issue guiding documents, organize training and workshops, and instruct localities on how to implement epidemic-security measures in poultry farming. - Work closely with the Department of Animal Health to implement studies in market supply chain for poultry and poultry products. - Supervise and speed up the epidemic prevention and control in localities. 5.2.3.
Language:English
Score: 663944.87 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/...ential-infection-on-humans/en/
Data Source: un
Approach - The " One Health " approach will be used in which there is a close cooperation between the veterinary sector with other sectors such as health, market management, custom, border defense force, police, local authorities and international organizations to implement the most effective and comprehensive measures to ensure achievement of the designed objectives. (...) Organize technical training for local animal health system. - Regularly clean, sterilize and decontaminate high-risked areas, especially live bird markets. (...) Department of Animal Health - Work closely with the Department of Animal Health to produce messages to communicate about avian influenza and get directly involved in media and communication activities. - Issue guiding documents, organize training and workshops, and instruct localities on how to implement epidemic-security measures in poultry farming. - Work closely with the Department of Animal Health to implement studies in market supply chain for poultry and poultry products. - Supervise and speed up the epidemic prevention and control in localities. 5.2.3.
Language:English
Score: 663944.87 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/...ential-infection-on-humans/es/
Data Source: un
Approach - The " One Health " approach will be used in which there is a close cooperation between the veterinary sector with other sectors such as health, market management, custom, border defense force, police, local authorities and international organizations to implement the most effective and comprehensive measures to ensure achievement of the designed objectives. (...) Organize technical training for local animal health system. - Regularly clean, sterilize and decontaminate high-risked areas, especially live bird markets. (...) Department of Animal Health - Work closely with the Department of Animal Health to produce messages to communicate about avian influenza and get directly involved in media and communication activities. - Issue guiding documents, organize training and workshops, and instruct localities on how to implement epidemic-security measures in poultry farming. - Work closely with the Department of Animal Health to implement studies in market supply chain for poultry and poultry products. - Supervise and speed up the epidemic prevention and control in localities. 5.2.3.
Language:English
Score: 663944.87 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/...ential-infection-on-humans/fr/
Data Source: un
The Programme addresses key DRR priorities, which were identified by local authorities and various stakeholders in the sectors of protection and rescue, education, social and child protection, health and agriculture. (...) Outcome 2:   Citizens in the target locations, particularly the most vulnerable groups, have become more resilient to disasters. Results 10 local DRR platforms are established, bringing together 139 representatives of relevant sectors/institutions (civil protection, agriculture, education, social and child protection and health). (...) Global Package on Interpersonal Communication on Immunization was adjusted to the local context and training of trainers was conducted for pediatricians and epidemiologists.   71 health professionals improved their knowledge, awareness, accountability, and capacities in identified priority health care functions required before, during and after emergencies in selected municipalities, covering 10 primary health care centers providing quality breastfeeding support to mothers/families.
Language:English
Score: 663730.5 - https://www.undp.org/bosnia-herzegovina/projects/drr-project
Data Source: un
Capitalising on local expertise to protect the health of Malawi communities from climate change Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) Building on previous efforts, an alliance of local communities, organisations, experts and government representatives is working with WHO and others to build resilience and implement climate and health solutions. (...) The involvement and feedback of the HCCCT members was crucial in conducting the assement and ensuring its local relevance. Figure: Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment report for health sector in Malawi.
Language:English
Score: 663726.37 - https://www.who.int/news-room/...ommunities-from-climate-change
Data Source: un
Microsoft PowerPoint - ICNIRP RF guidelines ITU Amman Dec 2019 ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 The new ICNIRP radiofrequency guidelines Eric van Rongen Chairman, ICNIRP ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Submitted to Health Physics, publication December 2019 – Guidelines (exposure limits & rationale) – Technical appendix (dosimetry issues, background reference levels) – Biological appendix (overview health effects) • Public consultation, finished 9 October 2018 – ~120 contributions, >1000 individual comments Eric van Rongen2 Current status ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 1. (...) Identification of adverse health effect threshold – minimum RF EMF exposure level shown to produce harm, or – where there is insufficient RF research: • minimum exposure predicted to cause harm from non-RF literature, e.g. heating from other factors • = operational adverse health effect threshold Eric van Rongen3 Steps in the process ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Derivation of exposure limits (basic restrictions) – Application of reduction factors to health effect thresholds – Higher for general public (often: 50) than for occupational (often:10) • Derivation of reference levels – Field strength values derived from basic restrictions • Provide practical method to determine compliance with basic restrictions • Conservative for all realistic exposure conditions, not all possible exposure conditions Eric van Rongen4 Next steps ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 Reduction factors risk for effect 10 occupational exposure limit 50 gen. population exposure limit reference level reference level basic restriction basic restriction exposure level ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Draft WHO review on RF (2014), SCENHIR report (2015), SSM reports (2016-2018) + original papers not included • No evidence that RF EMF causes adverse health effects other then through heating – No evidence for cancer – No adverse non-thermal adverse health effects – Some evidence for some biological effects, but these are not adverse • Thermal biology literature also considered 6 Scientific basis Eric van Rongen ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Temperature increases taken to represent health effects, and restrictions set to avoid these • Distinction between steady-state and brief exposures (no dissipation of heat) • Whole-body exposure: increase >1 °C in body core temperature potentially harmful (=operational standard) – for comparison: ACGIH heat stress at work standard aims at protecting against >1 °C core body temperature increase • Local exposure: temperature >41 °C 7 Interaction mechanisms (temperature elevation) Eric van Rongen ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Previous: – SAR up to 10 GHz, power density at higher frequencies • Now: – whole-body SAR up to 300 GHz – local SAR up to 6 GHz – 6-300 GHz: absorbed (=incident - reflected) power density Eric van Rongen8 SAR and frequency ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • RF modelling predicts: – ~6 W/kg WBA SAR, 1 h, ambient temperature of 28 °C: core body temperature increase ~1 °C (consistent with the limited human measurement research) – WBA SAR for same effect higher in children (more efficient heat dissipation) • ICNIRP: adverse health effect threshold: WBA SAR of 4 W/kg averaged over 30 min (=time to ~ reach steady state) • Very conservative ! • Generation energy in human adult: ~1 W/kg at rest, ~2 W/kg standing, ~12 W/kg running Eric van Rongen9 SAR and body core temperature ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Tissue damage can occur at local temperatures >41-43 °C (time- dependent) • ICNIRP: adverse health effect threshold: Local temperature >41 °C • Type-1 tissues (normal temperature < 33-36 °C): 5 °C increase allowed – upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg, foot, pinna, cornea, anterior chamber and iris of the eye, epidermal, dermal, fat, muscle and bone tissue • Type-2 tissues (normal temperature < 38.5 °C ): 2 °C increase allowed – all tissues in the head, eye, abdomen, back, thorax and pelvis, excluding those defined as Type-1 tissue 10 Local exposure: tissues Eric van Rongen ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 • Modelling/extrapolation suggests: – ≤ 6 GHz: SAR10g of 20 W/kg: temperature increase max. 2 °C – >6 GHz: absorbed power density (Sab) of 200 W/m 2: temperature increase max. ~5 °C in superficial, less in deeper tissue • ICNIRP: adverse health effect levels: – 100 kHz - 6 GHz: • Head & Torso: local SAR10g 20 W/kg (averaged over 6 min) • Limbs: local SAR10g 40 W/kg (averaged over 6 min) – >6 - 300 GHz: Sab 200 W/m 2 (averaged over 6 min and 4 cm2) – Narrow beam exposure: >30-300 GHz: Sab 400 W/m 2 (averaged over 6 min and 1 cm2) • Also (complex) limits for short (pulsed) exposures 11 Local exposure: adverse health effect levels Eric van Rongen ITU meeting, Amman, Jordan, 2 December 2019 Parameter Freq. range ΔT Spatial Aver. time Health effect level Red. fact.
Language:English
Score: 663717.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R...20ITU%20Amman%20Dec%202019.pdf
Data Source: un
 Page 31 - Smart public health emergency management and ICT implementations - A U4SSC deliverable on city platforms           Basic HTML Version Table of Contents View Full Version Page 31 - Smart public health emergency management and ICT implementations - A U4SSC deliverable on city platforms P. 31 Figure 5: IoT-based safety management in SSC 60 In this regard, the public health emergency management framework has to be extended to include the SSC infrastructure as well as to incorporate the local stakeholders that appeared to play a crucial role during the pandemic (Figure 6). The SSC hard infrastructure can be used to continuously collect data from the local environment (sensors and even text, voice and video from local media) and contribute to the national public health control centre, together with the data from the national research labs and hospitals (process step 1.2.4 of Figure 6). (...) Activity monitoring, analytics and AI- based predictions at the local level (process step 2.2.3), either with the use of local control centres or independently (sewage analysis etc.) can also contribute.
Language:English
Score: 663523.05 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...s/files/basic-html/page31.html
Data Source: un
In most countries, health workers at the peripheral facility level are hired, managed and paid by district and local authorities. (...) Communities empowered for taking action on their own health and making health a local priority will improve acceptability and sustainability of health interventions. (...) This is very much the case for CHW programs, where local and district government, local health committees and district health management teams are better placed to notice opportunities for positive synergies as well as fragmentation, duplication, competition and gaps –in implementation, monitoring and reporting.
Language:English
Score: 663147.17 - https://www.who.int/workforcea...artenrs_harmonised_support.pdf
Data Source: un
WHO | Lesotho Nursing Initiative Access Home Alt+0 Content Alt+2 Search Search Submit Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Menu Global Health Workforce Alliance About the Alliance Members & partners Country responses Knowledge centre Media centre Global Forums Lesotho Nursing Initiative Author: Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) and the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) Country: Lesotho The initiative brought in local and foreign nurses to achieve the goal of ART scale up, whilst buying the MOHSW some time to identify funding to recruit locally, and to scale up domestic output. It identified a number of measures that can be taken to increase retention locally. It created a unique model of a government-to-government partnership that succeeded in keeping nurses within the region. © Clinton Health Access Initiative-Lesotho Patients waiting to be seen by a nursing initiative nurse at Ha Nkau, a rural health centre. (...) Policy description The Ministry of Health and Social Welfare MOHSW advertised posts for 100 local nurses to be hired on a 3-year contract at a higher salary level than existing MOHSW nurses, in an attempt to encourage HCWs back to the public sector.
Language:English
Score: 662944.3 - https://www.who.int/workforcea...e/forum/2011/hrhawardscs30/en/
Data Source: un
In an application received and recorded at the Registry of the Dispute Tribunal on 4 December 2009, the Applicant disputes the decision of the Assistant Secretary-General, Controller, Office of Programme Planning, Budgets and Accounts, to outsource the medical insurance plan for local staff to GMC Services. 2. He asks the Tribunal to rescind: (a) The above decision as it applies to local staff working in Bangkok; (b).. (...) The medical insurance plan for local staff and former local staff is fundamental to their living and working conditions; but paragraphs (f) and (h) of Rule 8.1 of the provisional Staff Rules provide that administrative instructions or directives on issues relating to staff welfare, including conditions of work and general conditions of life, shall be transmitted in advance to the executive committees of the representative staff bodies concerned for consideration; (b) Contrary to the view of the Management Evaluation Unit, the decision contested is appealable because it was a unilateral decision having a direct legal effect on many staff members, including the Applicant; (c) The requirement that current and former local staff produce the necessary documents for reimbursement of medical expenses in English has major disadvantages. (...) The Applicant challenges the decision to outsource management of the medical insurance plan for local staff to GMC Services as regards personnel serving in Bangkok.
Language:English
Score: 630390.04 - www.un.org/en/internalj...t/judgments/undt-2011-053e.pdf
Data Source: oaj