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LIST OF NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS REQUESTING ACCREDITATION TO THE 2ND WORLD ASSEMBLY ON AGEING AND ITS PREPARATORY COMMITTEE : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
Its mission is to facilitate collaborative studies and exchange of information on population ageing and longevity. It has been developing positives activities, proposing policy responses, identifying problems and proving results of studies regarding low fertility and ageing. It contributed to the implementation of the Long-term Care Insurance System. 54. International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) Walkden House, 10 Melton Street, London NW1 2EB, UNITED KINGDOM Tel 01242 821 384 Fax 01242 821 075 Email enquiries@ilcuk.org.uk Website www.ilcuk.org.uk Contact David G F Chalk Scope National Representatives Purpose and Objectives: The International Longevity Centre UK is the UK’s major independent think-tank for issues of longevity, ageing and the new life courses. Through active collaboration with experts in all related fields, ILC-UK aims to ensure that policy-makers and planners in whatever sector have a deepened understanding of all the social, economic and cultural consequences of enhanced longevity. ILC-UK runs a continuous work programme of seminars, papers and research projects, all with the purpose of supporting and sponsoring fresh thinking, new analysis and imaginative planning about the changing life of the elderly and society at large. 20 E/CN.5/2002/PC/4 55.
Language:English
Score: 888136.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=E/CN.5/2002/PC/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
It is characterized by its dynamic structure and melody (kunqiang) and classic pieces such as the Peony Pavilion and the Hall of Longevity. It combines song and recital as well as a complex system of choreographic techniques, acrobatics and symbolic gestures.
Language:English
Score: 881407 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...cultural-heritage/kun-qu-opera
Data Source: un
The cult sites are believed to provide cures for barrenness, headaches, and back pain and give the blessing of longevity. Veneration for the mountain blends pre-Islamic and Islamic beliefs.
Language:English
Score: 881407 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...s/sulaiman-too-sacred-mountain
Data Source: un
To ensure the solution’s longevity, the ILO also helped rehabilitate the forest in the watershed that fed Lale’s water supply.
Language:English
Score: 881407 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...uments/article/wcms_486730.pdf
Data Source: un
PRIORITY ISSUES IN ACHIEVING SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT THE ARAB REGION : AGE STRUCTURAL TRANSITIONS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ; ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR WESTERN ASIA (ESCWA) , COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT , ELEVENTH SESSION , KHARTOUM, 17-18 OCTOBER 2017
Life expectancy at birth will increase from 70.84 years in 2010-2015 to 76.75 years in 2045-2050, marking a total gain of 5.91 years in longevity. There is, however, a marked difference of 4-5 years between women and men. (...) The gap of almost three years between the longevity of women and that of men will remain. The fertility rate will continue to decline, from 3.51 cpw in 2010-2015 to 2.18 cpw in 2045-2050. 25. (...) The combination of low fertility and increase in longevity has accelerated the ageing process. Tunisia has become the second fast ageing country in the region after Lebanon.
Language:English
Score: 876919.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...DD/2017/IG.1/4(PART II)&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND STORAGE IN GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS AS CLEAN DEVELOPMENT MECHANISM PROJECT ACTIVITIES : RECOMMENDATION OF THE SUBSIDIARY BODY FOR SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL ADVICE
Decides that the modalities and procedures referred to in paragraph 2 above shall address the following issues: (a) The selection of the storage site for carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations shall be based on stringent and robust criteria in order to seek to ensure the long-term permanence of the storage of carbon dioxide and the long-term integrity of the storage site; (b) Stringent monitoring plans shall be in place and be applied during and beyond the crediting period in order to reduce the risk to the environmental integrity of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations; (c) Further consideration is required as regards the suitability of the use of modelling, taking into account the scientific uncertainties surrounding existing models, in meeting the stringency requirements of such monitoring plans, in particular taking into account the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories; (d) The criteria for site selection and monitoring plans shall be decided upon by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol and may draw upon relevant guidelines by international bodies, such as the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories; (e) The boundaries of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations shall include all above-ground and underground installations and storage sites, as well as all potential sources of carbon dioxide that can be released into the atmosphere, involved in the capture, treatment, transportation, injection and storage of carbon dioxide, and any potential migratory pathways of the carbon dioxide plume, including a pathway resulting from dissolution of the carbon dioxide in underground water; (f) The boundaries referred to in paragraph 3 (e) above shall be clearly identified; (g) Any release of carbon dioxide from the boundaries referred to in paragraph 3 (e) above must be measured and accounted for in the monitoring plans and the reservoir pressure shall be continuously measured and these data must be independently verifiable; FCCC/SBSTA/2010/L.24 3 (h) The appropriateness of the development of transboundary carbon dioxide capture and storage project activities in geological formations and their implications shall be addressed; (i) Any project emissions associated with the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations shall be accounted for as project or leakage emissions and shall be included in the monitoring plans, including an ex-ante estimation of project emissions; (j) A thorough risk and safety assessment using a methodology specified in the modalities and procedures, as well as a comprehensive socio-environmental impacts assessment, shall be undertaken by independent entity(ies) prior to the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations; (k) The risk and safety assessment referred to in paragraph 3 (j) above shall include, inter alia, the assessment of risk and proposal of mitigation actions related to emissions from injection points, emissions from above-ground and underground installations and reservoirs, seepage, lateral flows, migrating plumes, including carbon dioxide dissolved in aqueous medium migrating outside the project boundary, massive and catastrophic release of stored carbon dioxide, and impacts on human health and ecosystems, as well as an assessment of the consequences of such a release for the climate; (l) The results of the risk and safety assessment, as well as the socio- environmental impacts assessment, referred to in paragraphs 3 (j) and (k) above shall be considered when assessing the technical and environmental viability of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations; (m) Short-, medium- and long-term liability for potential physical leakage or seepage of stored carbon dioxide, potential induced seismicity or geological instability or any other potential damage to the environment, property or public health attributable to the clean development mechanism project activity during and beyond the crediting period, including the clear identification of liable entities, shall: (i) Be defined prior to the approval of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations as clean development mechanism project activities; (ii) Be applied during and beyond the crediting period; (iii) Be consistent with the Kyoto Protocol; (n) When determining the liability provisions referred to in paragraph 3 (m) above, the following issues shall be considered: (i) A means of redress for Parties, communities, private-sector entities and individuals affected by the release of stored carbon dioxide from carbon dioxide capture and storage project activities under the clean development mechanism; (ii) Provisions to allocate liability among entities that share the same reservoir, including if disagreements arise; (iii) Possible transfer of liability at the end of the crediting period or at any other time; (iv) State liability, recognizing the need to afford redress taking into account the longevity of liabilities surrounding potential physical leakage or seepage of stored carbon dioxide, potential induced seismicity or geological instability or any other potential damage to the environment, property or public health attributable to the clean development mechanism project activity during and beyond the crediting period; FCCC/SBSTA/2010/L.24 4 (o) Adequate provision for restoration of damaged ecosystems and full compensation for affected communities in the event of a release of carbon dioxide from the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations must be established prior to any deployment of related activities; 4. (...) Invites the Conference of the Parties to consider and resolve issues identified in decision 2/CMP.5, paragraph 29, as well as to address the following issues: (a) The selection of the storage site for carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations shall be based on stringent and robust criteria in order to seek to ensure the long-term permanence of the storage of carbon dioxide and the long-term integrity of the storage site; (b) Stringent monitoring plans shall be in place and applied in order to reduce the risk to the environmental integrity of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations; FCCC/SBSTA/2010/L.24 5 (c) Further consideration is required as regards the suitability of the use of modeling, taking into account the scientific uncertainties surrounding existing models, in meeting the stringency requirements of such monitoring plans, in particular taking into account the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories; (d) The criteria for site selection and monitoring plans shall be decided upon by the COP and may draw upon relevant guidelines by international bodies, such as the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories; (e) The boundaries of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations shall include all above-ground and underground installations and storage sites, as well as all potential sources of carbon dioxide that can be released into the atmosphere, involved in the capture, treatment, transportation, injection and storage of carbon dioxide, and any potential migratory pathways of the carbon dioxide plume, including a pathway resulting from dissolution of the carbon dioxide in underground water; (f) The boundaries referred to in paragraph 2 (e) above shall be clearly identified; (g) Any release of carbon dioxide from the boundaries referred to in paragraph 2 (e) above must be measured and accounted for in the monitoring plans and the reservoir pressure shall be continuously measured and these data must be independently verifiable; (h) The appropriateness of the development of transboundary carbon dioxide and capture projects in geological formations and their implications shall be addressed, if relevant; (i) A thorough risk and safety assessment using a methodology specified in modalities and procedures decided upon by the Conference of the Parties, as well as a comprehensive socio-environmental impacts assessment, shall be undertaken by independent entity(ies) prior to the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations; (j) The risk and safety assessment referred to in paragraph 2 (i) above shall include, inter alia, the assessment of risk and proposal of mitigation actions related to emissions from injection points, emissions from above-ground and underground installations and reservoirs, seepage, lateral flows, migrating plumes, including carbon dioxide dissolved in aqueous medium migrating outside the project boundary, massive and catastrophic release of stored carbon dioxide, and impacts on human health and ecosystems, as well as an assessment of the consequences of such a release for the climate; (k) The results of the risk and safety assessment, as well as the socio- environmental impacts assessment, referred to in paragraph 2 (i) and (j) above shall be considered when assessing the technical and environmental viability of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations; (l) Short-, medium- and long-term liability for potential physical leakage or seepage of stored carbon dioxide, potential induced seismicity or geological instability or any other potential damage to the environment, property or public health attributable to the carbon dioxide and capture project, including the clear identification of liable entities, shall be defined; (m) When determining the liability provisions referred to in paragraph 2 (l) above, the following issues shall be considered: (i) A means of redress for Parties, communities, private-sector entities and individuals affected by the release of stored carbon dioxide from carbon dioxide and capture projects; FCCC/SBSTA/2010/L.24 6 (ii) Provisions to allocate liability among entities that share the same reservoir, including if disagreements arise; (iii) Possible transfer of liability; (iv) State liability, recognizing the need to afford redress, taking into account the longevity of liabilities surrounding potential physical leakage or seepage of stored carbon dioxide, potential induced seismicity or geological instability or any other potential damage to the environment, property or public health attributable to the carbon dioxide and capture project; ( (n) n) Adequate provision for the restoration of damaged ecosystems and full compensation for affected communities in the event of a release of carbon dioxide from the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations must be established prior to any deployment of related carbon dioxide and capture activities; (o) The potential for perverse outcomes.
Language:English
Score: 872994.1 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...DS=FCCC/SBSTA/2010/L.24&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
QUESTION OF AGING : REPORT OF THE 3RD COMMITTEE : GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 40TH SESSION
t9 r The ceneral Assenbly, Recalling its resolution 33/52 of 14 December 1978, by uh i.ch it decided to organize a world Assembly on Aging ln 1982 as a forum to launch an international progranme of actlon aimed at guaranteeing econoroic and social security to older Persoosr as vrell as opportunites for them to contribute to national deve lopmen c, Reca lling further its resolution 37/5L of 3 Decenber 1982, by nhich it endorsed the International Plan of Action on Aging adopted by consengus by the World Assenbly on Aging, held at Vienna from 26 July to 6 August L952, y Reaffirninq the part of the preanble of the Plan of Action that solemnly recognizes that the guatity of life is no less import€nt lh€n longevity and that the aging should therefore, ag far as possibler be enabled to enjoy in their own familes and coflnunlties a life of fulfilflrent, health, gecurity and contentnent, apPreciatetl as an integral part of society, llell auare that the fornulation and inplementaEion of pol.icies on aging are the sovereign right and responsibility of each State, and recognizing that the promotion of the activities, safety and well-being of tbe elderly should be an esgentiat p6r! (...) / shows that in 1985, 55.4 per cent of the globat populatlon of Lhe elderly is living in developing regions and that by the year 2025 over 70 per cent of all persons sixty years of age and over are projected to llve in developing countries, uhich are least prepared to neet the economic and sociat consequences cf chis drastic ahift in poputation structure, Convinced Chat the elderly must be considered an inportant and necessa ry element in the developnent procegs at all levels within a given society, Convinced also tha t increaslng longevity i9 an achievement of nankind and a sign of progress, and that the aged are an asset and not a liability to society because of the invaluable contribution they can nrake by virtue of their accunula ted rreallb of knowledge and experlencer U See Report of the World Assernblv on Aqing, Vienna, 26 JuIv-6 Auqust 1982 (United Nations publication, Sales No.
Language:English
Score: 872994.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/40/928&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
INTERGENERATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS IN AGEING SOCIETIES : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
Of course, increasing longevity and decreasing birth rates have resulted in larger numbers of older persons both in absolute and relative terms. (...) The majority of adults are members of three-generation families. Increased longevity and postponed childbearing have opposing effects on the generational structure of families.
Language:English
Score: 872994.1 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...open&DS=ECE/WG.1/2009/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
REPORT OF THE OPEN-ENDED WORKING GROUP ON AGEING : OPEN-ENDED WORKING GROUP ON AGEING, 6TH WORKING SESSION, NEW YORK, 14-16 JULY 2015
Statements were also made by the representatives of the following non-governmental organizations: International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology; AARP; Gray Panthers; Centre for Gerontological Studies; and International Longevity Centre, Australia. Presentation by the Independent Expert on the enjoyment of all human rights by older persons 31. (...) Statements were made by the representative of Argentina, as well as by the representatives of the following non-governmental organizations: Associação Nacional do Ministério Público de Defesa dos Direitos dos Idosos e Pessoas com Deficiȇncia; Asociación Gerontológica Costarricense; Gray Panthers; HelpAge International; Japan Support Center for Activity and Research for Older People; International Longevity Centre Global Alliance, Ltd.; Senior Citizens Association of Zambia; Vietnam Association of the Elderly; International Association of Homes and Services for the Aging; International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse; and International Longevity Centre, Australia.
Language:English
Score: 866327.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...open&DS=A/AC.278/2015/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods