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UNITED NATIONS SALARY ALLOWANCE AND BENEFITS SYSTEM :INFORMATION SUPPLIED BY THE RAPPORTEUR OF THE SALARY REVIEW COMMITTEE IN RESPONSE TO A REQUEST MADE IN THE 5TH COMMITTEE
The second longevity at top of P.4 would by-pass P.5 entirely and overlap the first step of D.l. (...) Qualifying service before reaching first longevity step would be as follows: (a) If longevity steps introduced at P.3 only: Career official - 20 years (b) If longevity steps added at each grade from P.l to P.4: Non-career official - 9 years These al terna ti ves reflect two different concepts of 11longevi ty''. 5. (...) (1) Promotion from P.l to P.2 after 2 years probation (2) Coupling of P.2 and P.3 (3) Longevity steps at top of P.) These measures would enable suitable career officials to advance to $8500 net at Geneva (i.e. at New York $9200 if single or $9550 if married) whereas longevity steps at every grade fron P.l to P.4 rather tend to give a 11 career" aspect to non-career jobs.
Language:English
Score: 1123873.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/C.5/L.440&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
FOLLOW-UP TO THE WORLD SUMMIT FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE 24TH SPECIAL SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY : REVIEW OF RELEVANT UNITED NATIONS PLANS AND PROGRAMMES OF ACTION PERTAINING TO THE SITUATION OF SOCIAL GROUPS : MODALITIES FOR REVIEW AND APPRAISAL OF THE MADRID INTERNATIONAL PLAN OF ACTION ON AGEING : STATEMENT
In response to resolution 54/262 of 16 June 2000, the International Longevity Center took active part in the work of the Second World Assembly on Ageing. (...) In respect of priorities, threats to longevity are presented by infectious diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis, which have not been completely eradicated, and with the spread of HIV/AIDS. Additionally, there remain disparities in health and longevity among and within countries, and these should be addressed effectively.
Language:English
Score: 1103097.5 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=E/CN.5/2003/NGO/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
In this regard, it is not an exaggeration to say that Japan is exploring the frontier of increasing longevity. At the same time, however, it is true that a considerable gap in life expectancy exists in the world. (...) Since then, however, it increased rapidly and Japan transformed itself into the world's top country for longevity by the early 1980s. Japan is also the world front runner in terms of Healthy Life Expectancy. (...) Mild climate, a clean environment, and a relatively low-fat and low-calorie food culture featuring vegetables and fishes are believed to be the basis for Japan's transformation to the world's top country for longevity. Moreover, the introduction of a universal healthcare system which covers the whole population for an individual's entire lifetime has also contributed to this longevity.
Language:English
Score: 1102453 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...mission/2010/country/japan.pdf
Data Source: un
GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 11TH SESSION, 5TH COMMITTEE, 584TH MEETING, THURSDAY, 7 FEBRUARY 1957, NEW YORK
No one could cavil at the idea of making the longevity increments for P-3 provisional, as all the Salary Review Committee's pro- posals would have to stand the test of time. (...) From the outset it had had doubts about the Salary Review Committee's proposal for longevity increments but it had not wished to reject outright a system which had been recommended after exhaustive study by a highly competent Committee. (...) Taking the total figure of $10,000 mentioned, which was the same as that estimated by the Secretary-General for longevity increments in 1957, that meant that five-sixths of those concerned would receive no awards.
Language:English
Score: 1099536.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=A/C.5/SR.584&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Leading finance companies concur that employee welfare is a valuable indicator of companies’ profitability and longevity. “How companies are responding to COVID-19 has quickly become a differentiator in their brand reputation, talent attraction and sales” states Jeremy Davis, the CSR Vice-President of Moody Corporation. (...) The identification of social risks and the development of suitable employee welfare solutions is crucial for companies looking to increase their profitability and longevity. Ensuring Enterprises Longevity  Brand longevity hinges on the ability to deliver products and services that are not only efficient but also have a positive social impact. (...) As new consumers' purchasing decisions are ever-increasingly dependent on moral considerations and government pressure on the private sector to enhance employee’s welfare, the longevity of enterprises hinges on their social good.
Language:English
Score: 1094878.7 - https://www.unglobalcompact.or...gn/the-corporate-social-fabric
Data Source: un
Harnessing longevity in the future of work | DISD Skip to Content Welcome to the United Nations Toggle navigation Department of Economic and Social Affairs Social Inclusion Search UN DESA Home About Us What We Do Meet our Director International Days Expert Group Meetings Social Development Briefs Resources Newsletters Careers *COVID-19 Policy Briefs SDGs Issues Ageing Cooperatives Disability Employment Family Indigenous Inequality Poverty Social Inclusion Sport Youth Publications Civil Society Capacity Development News Calendar Contact Us Home About Us What We Do Meet our Director International Days Expert Group Meetings Social Development Briefs Resources Newsletters Careers *COVID-19 Policy Briefs SDGs Issues Ageing Cooperatives Disability Employment Family Indigenous Inequality Poverty Social Inclusion Sport Youth Publications Civil Society Capacity Development News Calendar Contact Us Home Harnessing longevity in the future of work Harnessing longevity in the future of work 3 September 2021 Ongoing and emerging global trends, such as globalization, new technologies, the rise in global inequality, demographic shifts, climate change and threats generated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, will dramatically impact societies and individuals of all ages, and will determine the nature and future of work. (...) Heterogeneity among older persons is observed in needs, capacities, preferences and health and economic status, among other factors, suggesting that a successful response to population ageing aimed at benefiting from the longevity revolution needs to be multifaceted. The recognition of the intersecting forms of discrimination experienced by persons at all stages of their lives, including gender and disability, is essential to understand what old age looks like. (...) Download the UN DESA Policy Brief #112: Harnessing longevity in the future of work Authors: Amal Abou Rafeh and Julia Ferre, Division For Inclusive Social Development, UN DESA.
Language:English
Score: 1094878.7 - https://www.un.org/development...1/09/longevity-future-of-work/
Data Source: un
Harnessing longevity in the future of work August 2021 United Nat ions Depar tment of Economic and Socia l Affa i rs 1 Harnessing longevity in the future of work Ongoing and emerging global trends, such as globalization, new technologies, the rise in global inequality, demographic shifts, climate change and threats generated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, will dramatically impact societies and individuals of all ages, and will determine the nature and future of work. (...) Key messages » Reaping the benefits of longevity for sustainable development demands the adoption of evidence-based policies that acknowledge the extension of longevity and re-examine existing attitudinal, legislative and institutional structures, including those in the labour market. » Based on emerging evidence of the potential contributions of older persons to economies and societies, countries should review current assumptions around population ageing and old age, shifting from a depiction of older persons as a homogeneous group and population ageing as a burden on economies, to a forward-thinking view that recognizes the social and economic contributions of older persons and that embraces the potential of an ageing population as a basis for future development. » Promoting the inclusion of older persons in the new realities of work requires addressing barriers in their access to decent work, including age-based discrimination, rigid labour markets, inadequate access to life-long learning, and participation in informal employment and unpaid care work. » Universal social protection systems are the foundation for social inclusion and economic prosperity. (...) Heterogeneity among older persons is observed in needs, capacities, preferences and health and economic status, among other factors, suggesting that a successful response to population ageing aimed at benefiting from the longevity revolution needs to be multifaceted. The recognition of the intersecting forms of discrimination experienced by persons at all stages of their lives, including gender and disability, is essential to understand what old age looks like.
Language:English
Score: 1094878.7 - https://www.un.org/development...ds/sites/22/2021/09/PB_112.pdf
Data Source: un
UN Search Development Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Search HOME COMMISSION THEMES DOCUMENTS EVENTS PUBLICATIONS ABOUT US Events UN Population Conferences Expert Group Meetings Coordination Meetings Other Meetings United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Mortality: Priorities for improved survival: ICPD beyond 2014 New York, 21-22 October 2013 Documents Objectives of the Meeting Report of the Meeting Presentations Overview of world mortality trends since ICPD Cheryl Sawyer (Population Division/DESA, United Nations) Further Reductions in Infant and Child Mortality: Opportunities and Challenges Kenneth Hill (Harvard University) Decomposing global disparities in life expectancy Sara Hertog (Population Division/DESA, United Nations) Longevity in the 21st Century: The tug of the past Alberto Palloni (University of Wisconsin, Madison) The changing landscape of NCDs & risk factors Sanjay Basu (Stanford University) Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: What Works? Rachel Nugent (University of Washington) Incentivizing Use of Health Care William Dow (University of California-Berkeley) Summary: key findings and implications of mortality trends for the global development agenda Alberto Palloni (University of Wisconsin, Madison) Expert papers No. 2013/10 - The changing landscape of non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors Sanjay Basu No. 2013/11 - Challenges and opportunities for further reductions in infant and child mortality Kenneth Hill and Li Liu No. 2013/12 - Improving the health of women and adolescents: an unfinished agenda Suzanne Petroni and Katherine Fritz No. 2013/13 - 2013/13 Incentivizing use of health care William Dow and Justin White No. 2013/15 - Longevity in the Twenty-first Century: How Strong is the Tug of the Past?
Language:English
Score: 1085872.2 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...ents/expert-group/20/index.asp
Data Source: un
Characters were woven onto the textile, with only two sections existent, namely “恩泽” (En Ze, means favor) and “下岁大孰宜子孙富贵寿” (Xia Sui Da Shu Yi Zi Sun Fu Gui Shou, means harvest next year for the wealth and longevity of the offspring), reflecting people’s longing for longevity and well-being of their descendants.
Language:English
Score: 1079979.1 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...-silk-woven-characters-en-ze-0
Data Source: un
He is a member of Global Future Council for Human Enhancement and Longevity, WEF. Prior to his current appointment, Mr. (...) The focus of his research to date has been on estimates of the upper limits to human longevity, exploring the health and public policy implications associated with individual and population aging, forecasts of the size, survival, and age structure of the population, pursuit of the scientific means to slow aging in people (The Longevity Dividend), and global implications of the re-emergence of infectious and parasitic diseases. (...) Olshansky is on the Board of Directors of the American Federation of Aging Research; he is the first author of The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging (Norton, 2001) and A Measured Breath of Life (2013); and co-edited Aging: The Longevity Dividend (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 2015).
Language:English
Score: 1078552.5 - https://www.itu.int/net4/wsis/forum/2021/Agenda/Session/273
Data Source: un