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Mauritius.doc All correspondences should be addressed to the Executive Director Date: 20 September 2004 To GSR2004@itu.int Low cost access to broadband and Internet Please refer to your correspondence dated 06 August 2004. (...) By making the incumbent’s local loop available to the Internet Service Providers, consumers benefit from low cost broadband access. (...) (iv) Removal of Regulatory Barriers One regulatory barrier for Internet Service Providers is the licence fees. Low licence fees or no licence fees at all for Internet Service Providers encourages competition and decreases the Internet access tariff.
Language:English
Score: 1064881.25 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...04/Contributions/Mauritius.pdf
Data Source: un
Turkey.doc Turkey’s Contributions to the GSR 2004 Consultation: Identifying best practice guidelines for promoting low cost broadband and internet connectivity The following regulatory principles are considered as essential in the promotion of low cost broadband and Internet connectivity: 1. Enabling an effective regulatory environment • A political support (especially a broadband policy) at the highest level that recognizes the role of broadband as a tool for development should be provided to support the promotion of any low cost broadband and Internet connectivity. • A series of policy and regulatory reform measures should be taken to achieve low cost broadband and Internet connectivity. These include: § Establishing a fair and transparent telecommunication regulatory framework that promotes low cost broadband and Internet connectivity. § Reviewing existing low cost broadband and Internet connectivity policies, regulations and practices periodically. § Conducting periodic public consultations with stakeholders to identify their needs and modify low cost broadband and Internet connectivity policies, regulation and practices accordingly. § Adopting technology-neutral licensing procedures enabling service providers to use the most cost-effective technology to provide services to the end users. § Reducing administrative burdens to decrease the costs of service provision to the end users. 2.
Language:English
Score: 1062999.1 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...GSR04/Contributions/Turkey.pdf
Data Source: un
Folie 1 Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 1 Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 2 Content Motivation for an open source, ultra low delay audio coding Extending the packet loss concealment algorithm ITU G.711 Appendix 1 to full bandwidth Comparing ultra low delay audio codecs Summary Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 3 From speech to ultra-low delay audio Telephone usage has long traditions but will they prevail? (...) Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 6 Content Motivation for an open source, ultra low delay audio coding Extending the packet loss concealment algorithm ITU G.711 Appendix I to full bandwidth Comparing ultra low delay audio codecs Summary Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 7 T1 Input After 10 ms Concealed Original G.711 Appendix I implements „a high quality low- complexity algorithm for packet loss concealment“. (...) V er si on ) MUSHRA value (5 assessors,  15 items) Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 14 Content Motivation for an open source, ultra low delay audio coding Extending the packet loss concealment algorithm ITU G.711 Appendix 1 to full bandwidth Comparing ultra low delay audio codecs Summary Chair for Computer Networks and Internet - Universität Tübingen 15 Overview on ultra-low delay audio codecs 1.
Language:English
Score: 1060700.6 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../06/17/T061700000D0042PDFE.pdf
Data Source: un
High/high 116 + 3.3 bn C. Low/low 73 + 2.6 bn D. Low fixed/high mobile: 14 economies with 156.8 m inhabitants Development path of 1980s Development path of 1990s Development path of 2000s ITU Internet Reports 2004: The Portable InternetITU Internet Reports 2004: The Portable Internet 7 FixedFixed--line broadband: Top 15line broadband: Top 15 0 5 10 15 20 25 Norway Finland USA Singapore Sweden Switzerland Netherlands Japan Belgium Denmark Taiwan, China Iceland Canada HK, China Korea (Rep.) (...) Change in the way we think about streaming content "Less emphasis on video-on-demand "More emphasis on one-to-many broadcasting via satellite to portable devices Japan and Korea’s new digital media band satellite will beam 40 Korean and 70 Japanese TV channels to mobile phones and PDAs ITU Internet Reports 2004: The Portable InternetITU Internet Reports 2004: The Portable Internet 12 UltraUltra--wide bandwide band New technology to allow devices to communicate at high speeds, New technology to allow devices to communicate at high speeds, across large frequency swaths, but at very low power.across large frequency swaths, but at very low power. (...) Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database ITU Internet Reports 2004: The Portable InternetITU Internet Reports 2004: The Portable Internet 19 EndlessEndless catchcatch--upup 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 High Upper middle Low er middle Low Internet users per 100 inhab., by income level 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2000 2001 2002 2003 High Upper middle Low er middle Low Broadband subs per 100 inhab., by income level Just as developing economies Just as developing economies start making progress in rolling start making progress in rolling out a particular technology, out a particular technology, another appears in richer another appears in richer economies and the cycle economies and the cycle repeats.repeats.
Language:English
Score: 1060336.9 - https://www.itu.int/osg/spu/pu...tableinternetoverview_2004.pdf
Data Source: un
Gutierrez, Jaap Van De Beek, 4 5 6 5 7 8 Robert Birke, Lydia Chen, Filip Idzikowski, Daniel Kilper, Paolo Monti, Jinsong Wu, 9 1) CNIT, Italy, 2) University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy, 3) AUT, New Zealand, 4) Lulea University of Technology, Sweden, 5) IBM Research, Switzerland, 6) Faculty of Electronics and Telecommunications, Poznan University of Technology, Poland 7) The University of Arizona, USA, 8) KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 9) University of Chile, Chile ABSTRACT rural and low-income ones. Specifically, users located in urban areas have the possibility to connect to the Internet Current trends in telecommunication networks foresee the by means of WiFi, radio access, fixed access and satellite adoption of the fifth generation (5G) of wireless networks connections. (...) These efforts aim to Index Terms— 5G networks, rural and low-income zones, build 5G networks that will dramatically improve the user future Internet, global connectivity experience, thanks to a sharp increase in the offered data rates, coupled also with extremely low latency times. (...) Finally, 5G has introduced the concept has reported that 69% of the world population is covered by of ”converged solution”, where the networks and the services the third generation (3G) network [2], which allows users to cooperate to deliver high bandwidth and extremely low delay connect with the Internet. Moreover, the penetration rate of to users. the Internet in North America is above 80% [3].
Language:English
Score: 1056005.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page117.html
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation 1 Toward a High Bandwidth  Low Carbon Future Don MacLean, IISD Associate Internet and Climate Change Workshop Hyderabad Internet Governance Forum December 4, 2008 2 Vision of a High Bandwidth Low Carbon  Future • Product of converging world views – Information society – Sustainable development • Internet and climate change – a practical focus for  making links between IS and SD • Questions – What is it? (...) ‘What if’ scenarios 5 Challenges • First order/direct ICT effects  – Greening ICT – R&D, standardization, good practices, user awareness • Second order/indirect ICT effects  – Promoting innovation, managing rebound and substitution  effects – Public and private sector engagement, policy, incentives and  regulation • Third order/systemic ICT effects  – Governing economic, social, environmental transformation – Values, goals, principles, processes 6 Advertisement • What can the IGF do to further the emergence  of a high bandwidth low carbon future? • See “Convergence Between the Information  Society and the Low Carbon Economy: An  Opportunity for Internet Governance  Innovation?” in A Vision Becomes Reality Slide Number 1 Vision of a High Bandwidth Low Carbon Future A Low Carbon Future A High Bandwidth Future Challenges Advertisement
Language:English
Score: 1048269.2 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../06/0F/T060F00600A0001PDFE.pdf
Data Source: un
The Haiti Rural Broadband initiative consists of an ecosystem of stakeholders — donors, Internet service providers, local IT entrepreneurs, implementing partners and strategic “anchor tenants” — engaged in a partnership to increase broadband access at low cost. (...) Lower bar for participation What about incumbent carriers? By flexibly combining low deployment costs, trained local support capacity and seed funding for network roll-out, the Haiti Rural Broadband initiative entices Internet service providers to participate. (...) Local network services that do not require Internet bandwidth are especially valuable in settings where such Internet bandwidth is scarce.
Language:English
Score: 1038073.3 - https://www.itu.int/net/itunews/issues/2011/04/23.aspx
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Template Sample page from ITU Internet Reports 2004 “The Portable Internet” © ITU -- www.itu.int/portableinternet Sample page from ITU Internet Reports 2004 “The Portable Internet” © ITU -- www.itu.int/portableinternet Identifying the market opportunity for the portable Internet The potential worldwide market opportunity for portable Internet technologies, over the next ten years or so, might be segmented into three blocks of potential users, each composed of around two-thirds of a billion people, making two billion in total (see Figure 3.2): A) The first block is composed of existing Internet users, of which there were around 665 million at the end of 2003. (...) Figure 3.2: Estimating the potential market for the portable Internet Broken down by type of usage category and by income category of country in which the potential portable Internet user lives A: Existing Internet Users (665 million at year-end 2003) B: Existing users owning ‘phone but no Internet (655 million at year-end 2003) C: Potential users with access to ‘phone but no Internet (?? (...) Potential addressable market, around 2 billion users Internet on mobile Internet on fixed-line broadband Internet on fixed-line dial-up (subscription) Other Internet users Low income, 6% Lower- middle income, 19% Upper- middle income, 7% High income, 68% Fixed-line + mobile in household Fixed-line but no mobile in household Mobile, but no fixed- line in household Other access to a fixed-line or mobile (e.g., in extended family, at work) Low income, 27% Lower- middle income, 54% Up-mid, 4% High income, 15% Fixed-line + mobile but no Internet Fixed-line, but no Internet or mobile Mobile phone, but no fixed-line or Internet Low, 2% Lower- middle income, 49% Upper- middle income, 10% High income, 39% Note: Values are indicative and estimated rather than accurate.
Language:English
Score: 1034917.2 - https://www.itu.int/osg/spu/pu...rtableinternet/sample%20PI.pdf
Data Source: un
http://www.apc.org access@apc.org APC Submission to the ITU Open Consultation (online and physical) on Expanding Internet Connectivity for the Council Working Group on International Internet Related Public Policy Issues (CWG-Internet) https://www.itu.int/en/council/cwg-internet/Pages/default.aspx 15 Dec 2020 1. (...) What can be done to overcome these challenges? Levels of internet access are particularly low in the land locked LDCs, many of which lack population scale/density or economic development levels to attract sufficient commercially driven competitive infrastructure development, and must often also pay for transit capacity from neighbouring countries to connect to the global internet transit providers. (...) In this respect it can be noted that most small/community/non-profit initiatives have adopted a model where the local community owns and operates the physical access infrastructure to provide communication services to the end-user on a cost-recovery basis. The North American Internet Registry ARIN defines18 community networks as follows: “A community network is deployed, operated, and governed by its users, for the purpose of providing free or low-cost connectivity to the community it services.
Language:English
Score: 1034686.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/SiteAss...TU-CWG-Submission-Dec-2020.pdf
Data Source: un
It typically works in places where there is little power or Internet service, and where local staff has limited ICT skills. (...) The Haiti Rural Broadband initiative consists of an ecosystem of stakeholders — donors, Internet service providers, local IT entrepreneurs, implementing partners and strategic “anchor tenants” — engaged in a partner- ship to increase broadband access at low cost. (...) By fl exibly combin- ing low deployment costs, trained local support capac- ity and seed funding for network roll-out, the Haiti Rural Broadband initiative entices Internet service providers to participate.
Language:English
Score: 1032609.6 - https://www.itu.int/net/itunew...sues/2011/04/pdf/201104_23.pdf
Data Source: un