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This served as an unstiffened corset, helping to maintain posture while horse riding during long journeys.  (...) However, the lower classes did not wear this garment.  Cooks wore garments resembling boiler suits, traders and artisans wore loose-fitting garments, and farmers wore thick cotton dresses with colorful turbans.  (...) Although the concept remains the same, “delis”, as well as many other garments from the Silk Roads that date from the 10 th to 13 th centuries, have continued to evolve and gain complexity, while maintaining their unique characteristics.   
Language:English
Score: 1335068.2 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...tatus-and-regional-differences
Data Source: un
The COVID-19 pandemic and Asian garment factories The Asian garment industry is facing severe impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. (...) Responding to the urgent needs of the garment industry, the ILO has developed a series of six guides for garment factory managers to navigate the COVID-19 crisis. (...) Communicating with your workers: Maintain good internal communications for a more responsive and productive factory environment during the crisis.
Language:English
Score: 1334460.9 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_748045.pdf
Data Source: un
Under the agreement the US promised Cambodia better access to US markets in exchange for improved working conditions in the garment sector. The ILO project was established in 2001 to help the sector make and maintain these improvements. (...) It is funded by the US Department of Labour, USAID, Agence Francaise de Developpement, the Garment Manufacturers’ Association in Cambodia, the Royal Government of Cambodia and international buyers. Better Factories Cambodia was formerly known as the ILO Garment Sector Project. The new name better reflects the present aims of the ILO project.
Language:English
Score: 1312453.8 - https://www.ilo.org/asia/proje...WCMS_099340/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
We deal with buyers in the United States, who are monitored by human rights and compliance groups. This helps us maintain competitiveness of the sector.” Maintaining competitiveness, while also maintaining fair terms of employment, decent working conditions, and collective bargaining rights is a key balance. (...) Pakistani Arshad Ali, who has worked in Jordan's garment sector for 36 years, says it’s a good thing migrant workers can now join trade unions “because the garment factories have many problems.” (...) Story written by Mr Jonathan Kalan Jordan's Garment Industry: Migrating to Better Work A look at how Better Work is being implemented in Jordan, and the positive effect it is having on garment industry workers in that country.  
Language:English
Score: 1296353.5 - https://www.ilo.org/global/abo...WCMS_195584/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
Asia - LSGSC project Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains project: A Programme of Action for Asia and the Garment Sector The development objective of the Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains (LSGSC) project was to improve the lives of workers and increase decent work opportunities in global supply chains (GSCs) in the garment sector, starting with the project’s beneficiary countries: Cambodia, Indonesia and Pakistan. (...) The project Highlights and Insights of LSGSC project Purchasing practices and working conditions in global supply chains: Global Survey results Independent final evaluation of LSGSC project Target countries Cambodia Indonesia Pakistan Highlights In Cambodia, the Independent Final Evaluation described the project’s results as a “success story of effective support for minimum wage-setting mechanisms reform with notable outcomes in terms of improving the wage-negotiation process as well as in terms of raising actual wages while maintaining the garment industry’s competitiveness”. (...) LSGSC contributed to massive open online courses (MOOC) on topics related to decent work in global supply chains that have been accessed by more than 14,000 trade union representatives and other global supply chains stakeholders. Asia-Pacific Garment and Footwear Sector Research Notes Issue 1: Strong export and job growth in Asia’s garment and footwear sector Issue 2: Minimum wages in the global garment industry (update for 2015 ) Issue 3: Working hours in the global garment industry Issue 4: Gender pay gaps persist in Asia’s garment and footwear sector Issue 5: Weak minimum wage compliance in Asia’s garment industry Issue 6: Employment and wages in Myanmar’s nascent garment sector Issue 7: Employment and wages rising in Pakistan’s garment sector Issue 8: Developing Asia’s garment and footwear industry: Recent employment and wage trends Issue 9: Gender pay gaps in the garment, textile and footwear sector in developing Asia Tags: working conditions, minimum wage, collective bargaining, partnerships Regions and countries covered: Asia, Cambodia, Pakistan, Indonesia Tools A A+ A++ Print Share this content in Key resources ILO Global Wage Report portal Industrial Relations Data (IRData) ILO's Legal Database on Industrial Relations (IRLex) See also Publications Minimum Wage Policy Guide: Full Chapters [pdf 1903KB] Purchasing practices and working conditions in global supply chains: Global Survey results [pdf 586KB] Global Comparative Study on Wage Fixing Institutions and their Impacts in Major Garment Producing Countries [pdf 1825KB] Event Regional Workshop on Consultation, Co-operation and Collective Bargaining in the Garment Sector in Asia Web pages Collective bargaining and labour relations - ILO thematic page Wages - ILO thematic page The Global Labour University (GLU) Online Academy - Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) © 1996-2022 International Labour Organization (ILO) | Copyright and permissions  | Privacy policy | Fraud alert | Disclaimer   Skip to top
Language:English
Score: 1293706.25 - https://www.ilo.org/asia/proje...WCMS_410167/lang--ru/index.htm
Data Source: un
Asia - LSGSC project Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains project: A Programme of Action for Asia and the Garment Sector The development objective of the Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains (LSGSC) project was to improve the lives of workers and increase decent work opportunities in global supply chains (GSCs) in the garment sector, starting with the project’s beneficiary countries: Cambodia, Indonesia and Pakistan. (...) The project Highlights and Insights of LSGSC project Purchasing practices and working conditions in global supply chains: Global Survey results Independent final evaluation of LSGSC project Target countries Cambodia Indonesia Pakistan Highlights In Cambodia, the Independent Final Evaluation described the project’s results as a “success story of effective support for minimum wage-setting mechanisms reform with notable outcomes in terms of improving the wage-negotiation process as well as in terms of raising actual wages while maintaining the garment industry’s competitiveness”. (...) LSGSC contributed to massive open online courses (MOOC) on topics related to decent work in global supply chains that have been accessed by more than 14,000 trade union representatives and other global supply chains stakeholders. Asia-Pacific Garment and Footwear Sector Research Notes Issue 1: Strong export and job growth in Asia’s garment and footwear sector Issue 2: Minimum wages in the global garment industry (update for 2015 ) Issue 3: Working hours in the global garment industry Issue 4: Gender pay gaps persist in Asia’s garment and footwear sector Issue 5: Weak minimum wage compliance in Asia’s garment industry Issue 6: Employment and wages in Myanmar’s nascent garment sector Issue 7: Employment and wages rising in Pakistan’s garment sector Issue 8: Developing Asia’s garment and footwear industry: Recent employment and wage trends Issue 9: Gender pay gaps in the garment, textile and footwear sector in developing Asia Tags: working conditions, minimum wage, collective bargaining, partnerships Regions and countries covered: Asia, Cambodia, Pakistan, Indonesia Tools A A+ A++ Print Share this content in Key resources ILO Global Wage Report portal Industrial Relations Data (IRData) ILO's Legal Database on Industrial Relations (IRLex) See also Publications Minimum Wage Policy Guide: Full Chapters [pdf 1903KB] Purchasing practices and working conditions in global supply chains: Global Survey results [pdf 586KB] Global Comparative Study on Wage Fixing Institutions and their Impacts in Major Garment Producing Countries [pdf 1825KB] Event Regional Workshop on Consultation, Co-operation and Collective Bargaining in the Garment Sector in Asia Web pages Collective bargaining and labour relations - ILO thematic page Wages - ILO thematic page The Global Labour University (GLU) Online Academy - Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) © 1996-2022 International Labour Organization (ILO) | Copyright and permissions  | Privacy policy | Fraud alert | Disclaimer   Skip to top
Language:English
Score: 1293706.25 - https://www.ilo.org/asia/proje...WCMS_410167/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
The Better Work Programme, founded in 2009, is aimed at improving work conditions of thousands of garment factories in eight countries, including Bangladesh and Indonesia. Mr Rees explained to Andita Listyarini how to maintain the balance between fair work conditions and profit-making and why that can boost competitiveness. Duration: 3’01” Photo Credit: ILO Bangladesh Asia Economic development human rights Regions-All Syndication Women, children, population better work garment ILO International Labour Organization labour rights UN Radio united nations workers rights World Bank   ♦ Receive daily updates directly in your inbox - Subscribe here to a topic. ♦ Download the UN News app for your iOS or Android devices.  
Language:English
Score: 1270432.6 - https://news.un.org/en/audio/2016/11/619122
Data Source: un
ILO Liaison Office in Myanmar The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar's garment sector ILO Liaison Office in Myanmar The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar's garment sector The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar’s garment sector. (...) Findings revealed how it was difficult for workers to maintain six feet physical distancing in the factories and dormitories. 67 Myanmar Times (27 March 2020) 68 The Guardian (Oct 2020): COVID-19 laws are getting used to slice garment workers 69 China Labour Bulletin (December 2020): Myanmar workers protest union busting efforts in the garment industry 70 https://www.irrawaddy.com/news/burma/myanmars-garment-sector-facing-implosion-orders-slump-covid-19.html 71 Fabric Asia’s live panel discussion on “Getting through this crisis together”. https://www.irrawaddy.com/news/burma/myanmars-garment-sector-facing-implosion-orders-slump-covid-19.html ILO Liaison Office in Myanmar14 4. (...) Lead-time is one of the important aspects of the relationship between brands/suppliers and manufacturers in order to maintain competitive prices and the business relationship.72 Financial penalties 72 Behrooz Asgri and Anyul Hoque (2013) The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar’s garment sector 15 may be imposed by a brand/supplier for late delivery.73 Half of the interviewed factories experienced a shortage of raw materials for two to three weeks, due to transport disruptions and/or the closure of supplier factories in China, especially in the months of February and March 2020.
Language:English
Score: 1263968.1 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...ts/publication/wcms_815351.pdf
Data Source: un
ILO Liaison Office in Myanmar The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar's garment sector ILO Liaison Office in Myanmar The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar's garment sector The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar’s garment sector. (...) Findings revealed how it was difficult for workers to maintain six feet physical distancing in the factories and dormitories. 67 Myanmar Times (27 March 2020) 68 The Guardian (Oct 2020): COVID-19 laws are getting used to slice garment workers 69 China Labour Bulletin (December 2020): Myanmar workers protest union busting efforts in the garment industry 70 https://www.irrawaddy.com/news/burma/myanmars-garment-sector-facing-implosion-orders-slump-covid-19.html 71 Fabric Asia’s live panel discussion on “Getting through this crisis together”. https://www.irrawaddy.com/news/burma/myanmars-garment-sector-facing-implosion-orders-slump-covid-19.html ILO Liaison Office in Myanmar14 4. (...) Lead-time is one of the important aspects of the relationship between brands/suppliers and manufacturers in order to maintain competitive prices and the business relationship.72 Financial penalties 72 Behrooz Asgri and Anyul Hoque (2013) The impact of COVID-19 on Myanmar’s garment sector 15 may be imposed by a brand/supplier for late delivery.73 Half of the interviewed factories experienced a shortage of raw materials for two to three weeks, due to transport disruptions and/or the closure of supplier factories in China, especially in the months of February and March 2020.
Language:English
Score: 1263968.1 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_815351.pdf
Data Source: un
22 April 2020 1 COVID-19: ACTION IN THE GLOBAL GARMENT INDUSTRY _______________________________________________________________________________ Our starting point Organisations endorsing this statement commit to take action to protect garment workers’ income, health and employment and support employers to survive during the COVID-19 crisis, and to work together to establish sustainable systems of social protection for a more just and resilient garment industry. (...) Paying manufacturers for finished goods and goods in production. b. Maintaining quick and effective open lines of communication with supply chain partners about the status of business operations and future planning. 22 April 2020 2 c. (...) We do not know how long it will be until the demand for garments returns, in what form, scope and scale garment value chains will resume operations, and when manufacturing may resume in safe working conditions.
Language:English
Score: 1256313.2 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...enericdocument/wcms_742371.pdf
Data Source: un