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22 April 2020 1 COVID-19: ACTION IN THE GLOBAL GARMENT INDUSTRY _______________________________________________________________________________ Our starting point Organisations endorsing this statement commit to take action to protect garment workers’ income, health and employment and support employers to survive during the COVID-19 crisis, and to work together to establish sustainable systems of social protection for a more just and resilient garment industry. (...) Paying manufacturers for finished goods and goods in production. b. Maintaining quick and effective open lines of communication with supply chain partners about the status of business operations and future planning. 22 April 2020 2 c. (...) We do not know how long it will be until the demand for garments returns, in what form, scope and scale garment value chains will resume operations, and when manufacturing may resume in safe working conditions.
Language:English
Score: 1256313.2 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...enericdocument/wcms_742371.pdf
Data Source: un
Further, women workers who do go back to work may face more difficulty than men in maintaining their paid employment, given the demands of their unpaid care work at home, and they may need temporary flexible working arrangements or leave time to support their family’s needs (ILO 2009). (...) This also raises concerns regarding respect for women’s right to maintain control over their bodies, which includes access to timely and comprehensive sexuality education and the ability to choose if, when, with whom and how often to engage in sex, particularly amid rising instances of GBV. (...) To minimize the effects of COVID- 19 on the livelihoods of women and men workers in the garment sector, it is essential that attention is paid to retrenchment and closure practices, promoting access to financial inclusion and creating and maintaining social protection and safety nets that are responsive to and accessible for both women and men.
Language:English
Score: 1253305.1 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_760374.pdf
Data Source: un
Further, women workers who do go back to work may face more difficulty than men in maintaining their paid employment, given the demands of their unpaid care work at home, and they may need temporary flexible working arrangements or leave time to support their family’s needs (ILO 2009). (...) This also raises concerns regarding respect for women’s right to maintain control over their bodies, which includes access to timely and comprehensive sexuality education and the ability to choose if, when, with whom and how often to engage in sex, particularly amid rising instances of GBV. (...) To minimize the effects of COVID- 19 on the livelihoods of women and men workers in the garment sector, it is essential that attention is paid to retrenchment and closure practices, promoting access to financial inclusion and creating and maintaining social protection and safety nets that are responsive to and accessible for both women and men.
Language:English
Score: 1253305.1 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...ts/publication/wcms_760374.pdf
Data Source: un
The recommendations in this guide will help you to reduce costs in a socially responsible manner. In doing so, garment operators can ultimately:  Focus on maintaining operations and minimize strain on the factory in the long-run  Build resilience during and after the COVID-19 outbreak, and  Increase their competitiveness over time. 2. (...) Action Ease of implementation Timeline Check In your financial statement or completed template, identify costs which are not essential for your factory to maintain operations but linked to non- critical activities. (...) Mid-term   Engage together in the work of your garment association to strengthen the competitiveness and resiliency of your country’s garment sector.
Language:English
Score: 1252376.5 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_748065.pdf
Data Source: un
At the same time, the garment sector in Pakistan is characterised by persistent decent work deficits, including poor working conditions, and low wages. The raw gender pay gap in the garment sector in Pakistan is approximately 57.3 per cent . (...) In this context, the LSGSC project in Pakistan maintained a particular geographic emphasis on Sindh province, which is an important centre of garment production in the country.
Language:English
Score: 1249409.4 - https://www.ilo.org/islamabad/...WCMS_355680/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
The Lao PDR garment sector employs some 26,000 workers. It has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic with many factories scaling back production, releasing staff and in some cases closing their doors. (...) The Association of Lao Garment Industry (ALGI) and the Lao Federation of Trade Unions (LFT) have been involved in its development and will support the scheme’s operation. “The Lao garment industry has been hit hard by COVID-19. Income support will help workers survive this difficult period and businesses maintain their staff so they are in a better position to resume operations when the impact of the pandemic eases,” said Graeme Buckley, Director of ILO Country Office for Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR.
Language:English
Score: 1240954.7 - https://www.ilo.org/asia/media...WCMS_773038/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
These negative economic and public health shocks are reverberating in Ethiopia, and in particular in the country’s garment and textile sector. A global collapse in demand for garments has been witnessed since the first quarter of 2020, following measures by governments to slow the spread of the pandemic. (...) Only a relatively small percentage of workers (14 per cent) claimed they had looked for a new job in the past two months, which is in line with expectations given the majority still maintain their current job, even while its income- generating potential diminishes. (...) As detailed in this brief, a large proportion of workers are facing reduced incomes, due to lower working hours and fewer bonuses, and are needing to dip into their savings or consider other strategies to maintain their livelihoods. Moreover, the immediate health and safety of workers in large manufacturing facilities is likely at risk as the virus continues to spread in Ethiopia.
Language:English
Score: 1238604.5 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_751045.pdf
Data Source: un
It is very important that the application equipment is in a good state of repair and that it is properly maintained and calibrated. Leaking knapsack sprayers, for example, are a source of contamination of clothing and skin (11). (...) In practice this includes a long-sleeve upper garment, a garment covering the lower body including the legs, footwear (boots or shoes) and, if spraying high crops, a hat (Figure 1). (...) This two-piece design gives greater flexibility to the wearer because the top or the trousers can be worn separately or together over normal work clothing according to the type of pesticide operation. Protective garments must be maintained and cleaned in the same way as work clothing as described in Section 4.1.1. -13- FIGURE 5 -14- FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 -15- 4.2.4 Footwear It is recommended that footwear should be worn during pesticide operations and should be made of a material which can be easily washed and decontaminated.
Language:English
Score: 1227825.6 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ode/Old_guidelines/PROTECT.pdf
Data Source: un
At the industry level, BWJ supports stakeholder organizations which represent the government, workers and employers to: Enhance industrial relations and social dialogue; expand collaboration with the Ministry of Labour; increasing Jordanian employment in the garment sector; influence public and private sector policy debates through interventions at the factory level as well as through its impact assessment agenda; work with key stakeholders to eliminate practices that can be associated with forced labour and discrimination at work; and maintain buyers’ engagement through the Annual Buyers Forum to discuss sectorial priorities. (...) Impact Steady improvement of factory compliance with ILS and Jordanian labour law; implementation of a new collective bargaining agreement; and establishment of a unified contract for garment migrant workers; establishment of the first workers’ centre in Jordan; development of a long-term strategy for the garment sector; and a marked increase in the number of international brands that source garment products from Jordan. Tags: migrant workers, enterprises, manufacturing, value chains Regions and countries covered: Jordan Tools This content is available in العربية A A+ A++ Print Share this content in See also Document Staff List Press releases Jordan’s garment sector removed from US forced labour listing Buyers’ Forum discusses challenges and opportunities in light of Syria refugee crisis Project documentation Project Brief: Better Work Jordan Phase I [pdf 59KB] Videos Building Hope and Opportunity: The Al Hassan Workers' Center Decent work opportunities to poor Jordanian women in Ajloun Collective Bargaining In Jordan's Ready Made Garment Sector Jordan's Garment Industry: Migrating to Better Work Web pages Ministry of Labour Jordan Chamber of Commerce Jordan Chamber of Industry The General Trade Union of Workers in Textile Garment & Clothing Industries © 1996-2022 International Labour Organization (ILO) | Copyright and permissions  | Privacy policy | Fraud alert | Disclaimer   Skip to top
Language:English
Score: 1218432.3 - https://www.ilo.org/beirut/pro...WCMS_221207/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
At the industry level, BWJ supports stakeholder organizations which represent the government, workers and employers to: Enhance industrial relations and social dialogue; expand collaboration with the Ministry of Labour; increasing Jordanian employment in the garment sector; influence public and private sector policy debates through interventions at the factory level as well as through its impact assessment agenda; work with key stakeholders to eliminate practices that can be associated with forced labour and discrimination at work; and maintain buyers’ engagement through the Annual Buyers Forum to discuss sectorial priorities. (...) Impact Steady improvement of factory compliance with ILS and Jordanian labour law; implementation of a new collective bargaining agreement; and establishment of a unified contract for garment migrant workers; establishment of the first workers’ centre in Jordan; development of a long-term strategy for the garment sector; and a marked increase in the number of international brands that source garment products from Jordan. Tags: migrant workers, enterprises, manufacturing, value chains Regions and countries covered: Jordan Tools This content is available in العربية A A+ A++ Print Share this content in See also Document Staff List Press releases Jordan’s garment sector removed from US forced labour listing Buyers’ Forum discusses challenges and opportunities in light of Syria refugee crisis Project documentation Project Brief: Better Work Jordan Phase I [pdf 59KB] Videos Building Hope and Opportunity: The Al Hassan Workers' Center Decent work opportunities to poor Jordanian women in Ajloun Collective Bargaining In Jordan's Ready Made Garment Sector Jordan's Garment Industry: Migrating to Better Work Web pages Ministry of Labour Jordan Chamber of Commerce Jordan Chamber of Industry The General Trade Union of Workers in Textile Garment & Clothing Industries © 1996-2022 International Labour Organization (ILO) | Copyright and permissions  | Privacy policy | Fraud alert | Disclaimer   Skip to top
Language:English
Score: 1218432.3 - www.ilo.org/beirut/proj...WCMS_221207/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un