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Place or country where they were manufactured or produced. c. Components of their composition. d. (...) Such indication, however, shall include correct data relevant to the date, type, and the authority which granted such distinctive features. A party which participates in the display of products with others may not use for its own products those distinctive features awarded on jointly displayed products unless the source and type of distinctive features are indicated clearly. 3 Article 4: The seller’s name or address may not be affixed to products imported from a country other than that where the sale takes place, unless accompanied by a precise statement legibly written, indicating the country or place where the product was manufactured or produced. (...) Article 5: A manufacturer who owns a main factory in a certain area may not use the designation of such area on products manufactured for his own account in another area, unless such designation is coupled with the indication of the other area in a way that precludes any confusion.
Language:English
Score: 1164813.3 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...e/sau_e/WTACCSAU59A2_LEG_2.pdf
Data Source: un
Place or country where they were manufactured or produced. c. Components of their composition. d. (...) Such indication, however, shall include correct data relevant to the date, type, and the authority which granted such distinctive features. A party which participates in the display of products with others may not use for its own products those distinctive features awarded on jointly displayed products unless the source and type of distinctive features are indicated clearly. 2 Article 4: The seller’s name or address may not be affixed to products imported from a country other than that where the sale takes place, unless accompanied by a precise statement legibly written, indicating the country or place where the product was manufactured or produced. (...) Article 5: A manufacturer who owns a main factory in a certain area may not use the designation of such area on products manufactured for his own account in another area, unless such designation is coupled with the indication of the other area in a way that precludes any confusion.
Language:English
Score: 1164813.3 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...c_e/sau_e/WTACCSAU56_LEG_2.pdf
Data Source: un
“The Panel noted that the Japanese Law and Cabinet Order concerning Liquor Business Association and Measures for Securing Revenue of Liquor Tax stipulated that ‘Any manufacturer of liquors must indicate, at a legible location of the container of liquors ... which are shipped out from the manufacturing premise ..., the name of the manufacturer, the place of the manufacturing premise ..., the capacity of the container ..., the category of liquors ..., the grade of liquors and the following matters according to the category of liquors, in a conspicuous manner’, including the alcohol content in the case of wine, whisky, brandy, spirits and liqueurs. (...) The Panel found that this evidence seemed to confirm the Japanese submission to the Panel that the labels on liquor bottles manufactured in Japan indicated their Japanese origin. (...) The Panel did not dispose of evidence and was unable to find that the use by Japanese manufacturers of labels written partly in English (in the case of whisky and brandy) or in French (in the case of wine) , the use of the names of varieties of grapes (such as ‘Riesling’ or ‘Semillon’), or the use of foreign terms to describe Japanese spirits (‘whisky’, ‘brandy’) or Japanese wines (‘chateau’, ‘reserve’, ‘vin rose’) had actually been to the detriment of ‘distinctive regional or geographical names of products’ produced and legally protected in the EEC.
Language:English
Score: 1098873.4 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...i17_e/gatt1994_art9_gatt47.pdf
Data Source: un
A copy of the report is attached for your convenience. Manufacturing Data To facilitate ICAO’s further analysis, we thought it would be helpful to provide you with manufacturing data on the number of lithium ion cells and batteries and portable devices 2 powered by lithium ion cells and batteries. (...) Takeshita’s presentation shows that approximately 4.4 billion lithium ion cells will have been manufactured in 2011. By 2020, it is estimated that 6.5 billion lithium ion cells will be manufactured annually. (...) Takeshita’s presentation shows that approximately 231 million notebooks and 1.4 billion cellular phones will be manufactured in 2011. Page 4 also has an interesting chart showing the number of lithium ion cells manufactured for use in various consumer products.
Language:English
Score: 1063232.2 - https://www.icao.int/safety/Da...s201/DGPWGLB.1.IP.001.6.en.pdf
Data Source: un
(c) prescribe a distinctive mark for any commodity which complies with a compels standard specification or which has been manufactured, produced, processed or treated in accordance therewith and may abolish or amend any such mark. (...) Sec. 6.13 After a distinctive mark has been prescribed in accordance with paragraph (c) of Sec. 6.7 No person shall apply that mark to any commodity except under and by virtue of a permit issued to him under this Act and unless that commodity or its manufacture, production, processing or treatment complies with the compulsory standard specification relative thereto. (...) MISCELLANEOUS Sec. 8.1 The fact that any commodity complies or is alleged to comply with a standard specification or a compulsory standard specification or has been or is alleged to have been manufactured, produced, processed or treated in accordance with any such specification, or that a distinctive mark or standardization mark is used in connation with any commodity, shall not give rise to any claim against the Government, the Council, or the Bureau, or any member or employee thereof.
Language:English
Score: 1041896.6 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...c_e/lbr_e/WTACCLBR15_LEG_9.pdf
Data Source: un
Value chains and global manufacturing create growth opportunities with important spillovers within national territories and across regions. (...) About this publication The increasing internationalization of supply c hains is challenging our interpretation of conventional trade statistics, as traditional concepts like country of origin, or the distinction between goods and services, become blurred. (...) Value chains and global manufacturing create growth opportunities with important spillovers within national territories and across regions.
Language:English
Score: 998816.9 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...epat_globvalchains_flyer_e.pdf
Data Source: un
Barriers related to manufacturing • Recycling is not considered in the manufacturing of products Example: high-technology products such as • Manufacturers not disclosing components of products Examples: Mercury content of flat screen TVs; materials contained in used tyres • Prohibitive cost of management and disposal of non-recyclable residues; manufacturers shift the financial burden to recyclers Example: tyre manufacturers • The resilience of the recycling sector to market shocks is weak because the sector is characterised by SMEs • Recovery of critical raw materials: technologies for specific materials and products; establishment of value chains (example metal recycling) • Problems with implementation of „Product-Centric approach“: there is a gap in designing a product for recycling vs. rapidly changing designs and more complex products (e.g. example of metal recycling) D.3. (...) Introduction or clarification of obligations to manufactures and/or consumers • Development and enforcement of an EPR scheme to ensure that manufacturers to focus on sustainable green design resources security and share/transfer the responsibility/cost of collection &disposal (e.g. eco modulation- taxes based on use of specified quantities of materials used in several EU countries) • Development of new business models for sustainable recycling • Consider recycling as an integral part of green design and manufacturing • Obligation to manufacturers to use processes that facilitate recycling • Obligation of manufacturers to disclose components of products • Advance recycling fees (shifting costs to consumer) • Standardisation of the product designed out of recycled materials • Terminology of waste versus used material or material for recycling D.3. (...) • Legislation providing incentives and clear definition (54%) • Marketing interventions favouring recycling (Taxation, tax relief, subsidies favouring recycling) (23%) • Manufacturing requirement favouring recycling (e.g. Material composition: clear definitions and good understanding of valuable versus non-valuable (hazardous) chemicals; Requirements for favourable green design and manufacturing)(23%) 3.
Language:English
Score: 972937 - https://www.unido.org/sites/de...ustries%20-%2014-15Nov2018.pdf
Data Source: un
JPMD Ltd Japan Myanmar Development Institution Inc. 49% Virginia Tobacco Company Ltd Distinction Investment Holdings Pte.* 60% Gold Cement Co, Ltd GC Holdings 26.4% Telecom International Myanmar Company Limited (aka Mytel) Viettel 49% Moe Gyo Sulphuric Acid NORINCO —% Coal Mine and Power Plant (Mai Khot) Saraburi Coal Company Ltd. —% 51% MEC The Mission found that at least 14 foreign companies have joint ventures with Tatmadaw businesses, MEHL and MEC. (...) These businesses are listed in Annex V to the report. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Information and communication Mining and quarrying Arts, entertainment and recreation Tobacco Construction / Real estate Manufacturing Foreign company joint ventures with MEHL and MEC by Industry MEHL joint ventures MEC joint ventures MEC joint ventures MEHL joint ventures MEHL and MEC joint ventures MEC business MEHL business Foreign business 49% Percent owned by foreign business Gold Cement Co, Ltd Joint venture company name * The Mission was able to confirm that Distinction Holdings Pte. (...) The Mission was not able to confirm to whom Distinction Holdings Pte. Ltd. sold its stake in Virginia Tobacco Company Ltd.
Language:English
Score: 968086.7 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ventures_with_MEHL_and_MEC.pdf
Data Source: un
Networks for Prosperity: Achieving Development Goals through Knowledge Sharing | UNIDO Skip to main content quick access For Member States Employment Procurement For researchers Publications Statistical databases Research services Director General Quick Access Main navigation Who we are Who we are UNIDO in brief 2030 Agenda and the SDGs Programme for Country Partnership Inclusive and Sustainable Industrial Development Third Industrial Development Decade for Africa GMIS - Global Manufacturing & Industrialisation Summit UNIDO Worldwide Our focus Our focus Creating shared prosperity Advancing economic competitiveness Safeguarding the environment Strengthening Knowledge and Institutions Cross-cutting services Building a better future Stories News Centre News Centre News articles Events Multimedia Resources Resources Policymaking Organs Evaluation and Internal Oversight Procurement Statistics Publications Employment Home Our focus Cross-cutting services Partnerships for prosperi... (...) In this context, it can be observed that networks are increasingly  emerging as a distinct form of governance which includes different types  of public and private actors within and across organizational and  national boundaries. Different types of networks exist, whether for learning, information exchange or knowledge creation. Networks are a distinct form of governance with important potential for knowledge  creation and development performance.
Language:English
Score: 959650.8 - https://www.unido.org/our-focu...oals-through-knowledge-sharing
Data Source: un
Effects of training on competitiveness in the manufacturing sector | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Effects of training on competitiveness in the manufacturing sector Available in: English Effects of training on competitiveness in the manufacturing sector August 2007 | Regular Publications, Reviews and Bulletins » CEPAL Review International trade and integration Author: Juárez, Miriam - Padilla, Ramón UN symbol.: LC/G.2339-P p. 45-60 August 2007 Download Publication pdf Description This article examines the effect of training on competitiveness inthe manufacturing sector, drawing a distinction between industries withdiffering technological and productive characteristics. (...) At the firm level (microanalysis);, econometric tools are used to study the manufacturing sectorin Mexico. At the regional level (meso analysis);, the electronics industry inone region of Mexico is studied.
Language:English
Score: 957531.9 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...itiveness-manufacturing-sector
Data Source: un