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REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON ADEQUATE HOUSING AS A COMPONENT OF THE RIGHT TO AN ADEQUATE STANDARD OF LIVING, AND ON THE RIGHT TO NON-DISCRIMINATION IN THIS CONTEXT, RAQUEL ROLNIK : ADDENDUM
The current housing situation in Croatia is strongly shaped by a complex combination of two factors: the effects of the armed conflict on housing and the transition from a State-run to a market-oriented approach to housing. In addition, the economic recession in the country has posed additional challenges to the already difficult housing situation. 5. (...) In the early 1990s, deregulation, privatization, and strengthening of free market relations were the characteristics of Croatian housing policy. (...) More recently, the impact of the global financial crisis has been felt across all segments of Croatia’s economy and has deeply affected the housing sector.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1083204.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/16/42/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 21 DECEMBER 2020 FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL AND THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
.: General 21 December 2020 Resolution 2558 (2020) Adopted by the Security Council on 21 December 2020 The Security Council, Guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Reaffirming General Assembly and Security Council resolutions 70/262 and 2282 (2016) of 27 April 2016, as well as A/RES/60/180 and S/RES/1645 (2005) of 20 December 2005, A/RES/65/7 and S/RES/1947 (2010) of 29 October 2010, and A/RES/72/276 and S/RES/2413 (2018) of 26 April 2018, and recalling statements of the President of the Security Council of 28 July 2016, 21 December 2017, and 18 December 2018, Reaffirming that development, peace and security, and human rights are interlinked and mutually reinforcing, Reaffirming that ‘sustaining peace’ should be broadly understood as a goal and a process to build a common vision of a society, ensuring that the needs of all segments of the population are taken into account, which encompasses activities aimed at preventing the outbreak, escalation, continuation and recurrence of conflict, addressing root causes, assisting parties to conflict to end hostilities, ensuring national reconciliation, and moving towards recovery, reconstruction and development, and emphasizing that sustaining peace is a shared task and responsibility that needs to be fulfilled by the government and all other national stakeholders, and should flow through all three pillars of the United Nations’ engagement at all stages of conflict, and in all its dimensions, and needs sustained international attention and assistance, Reaffirming the primary responsibility of national Governments and authorities in identifying, driving and directing priorities, strategies and activities for peacebuilding and sustaining peace, and in this regard, emphasizing that inclusivity is key to advancing national peacebuilding processes and objectives in order to ensure that the needs of all segments of society are taken into account, Noting that this year marks the twentieth anniversary of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security, and the fifth anniversaries of Security council resolution 2250 (2015) on Youth, peace and security, and recognising the importance of the full, equal and meaningful participation of women and youth in peacebuilding, recalling further the fifth anniversary of the General S/2020/1269 20-17627 3/4 Assembly resolution, A/RES/70/1, entitled “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, Expressing grave concern about the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic across the world, especially in conflict-affected countries, and stressing the need for full implementation of Security Council resolution 2532 (2020) and noting the relevant provisions of General Assembly resolution A/RES/74/306 in this regard, further noting that 2020 inaugurates the decade of action on the SDGs, recognizing that progress towards achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and all its goals and targets could be hampered, and peacebuilding and development gains reversed, and emphasizing the need to integrate peacebuilding and sustaining peace into efforts to build back better, Welcoming the presentation of the report of the Secretary-General on peacebuilding and sustaining peace,1 and the valuable inputs for the 2020 review of the peacebuilding architecture of the Peacebuilding Commission through its letter dated 2 July 2020, of the group of Independent Eminent Persons through its letters dated 6 July 2020, and noting input from thematic and regional consultations, and encouraging relevant United Nations bodies and organs including the Peacebuilding Commission to consider the inputs further, 1.
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Puntuación: 1077405.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=S/2020/1269&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
Core Principles There are three principles that are crucial for the primary objective of a free trade agreement such as the GATS: market access (Article XVI), national treatment (Article XVII) and most- favored-nation (Article II). (...) Second, the principles apply not only to discriminatory measures against foreign services, suppliers and interests but also to non-discriminatory measures which may also affect significantly the supply of services in a particular market. Four of the measures listed as market access limitations in Article XVI, in addition to being quantitative in nature, are also non- discriminatory in their application – i.e., are applied in the same fashion in the market to both national and foreign service and service suppliers. (...) All of these indications are supposed to be included in the so-called “Schedules of Specific Commitments” where, therefore, countries will include the sectors and sub-sectors and, for each of these, indicate, for each of the modes of supply, the measures it binds in relation to market access and national treatment. If it chooses not to bind a particular mode of supply for a particular sub- sector for either market access or national treatment, it can simply inscribe the word “unbound”.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1064951.5 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...get?open&DS=LC/L.2544-P&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
POLICY COMPETITION FOR FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN THE CARIBBEAN BASIN : COSTA RICA, THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AND JAMAICA
Market shares of both Africa and Eastern Europe have collapsed. (...) While Latin America has lost import market shares for manufactures in both Western Europe (from 1% to 0.8%) and Japan (from 4% to 2%), its import market share in the North American market almost doubled (from 5% to 9%). (...) Thus, the dynamism of the Caribbean Basin exports of manufactures to the United States market stems primarily from the effects of new strategies by United States corporations facing intense competition from Asian imports in their own national market.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1059305.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...f/get?open&DS=LC/G.1991&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LIBERALIZATION OF TRADE IN SERVICES AND HUMAN RIGHTS : REPORT OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER
Commitments on “market access” set out the terms, limitations and conditions for market access which a country must apply without discrimination to the services and service suppliers of all WTO members.xxix There are six forms of limitation.xxx A full commitment on “market access” would therefore prohibit a country from limiting access to its services markets. However, a country need not make a full commitment to “market access” and WTO members can determine individually the limitations, conditions and terms of “market access” that fall short of full market access. (...) As noted above, commitments under “market access” and “national treatment” are made voluntarily and countries’ commitments can range from “unlimited market access” to “no commitment”, or can subject trade to express limitations or qualifications.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1058301.1 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...&DS=E/CN.4/SUB.2/2002/9&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON ADEQUATE HOUSING AS A COMPONENT OF THE RIGHT TO AN ADEQUATE STANDARD OF LIVING, MILOON KOTHARI :ADDENDUM
Social housing constitutes only a small and diminishing part of the market. For example in Victoria, it only represents 4 per cent of the market. (...) In Adelaide, the housing authorities admitted the need for state intervention, without which the market will not automatically deliver housing for low-income people. (...) Tenancy laws and anti-discrimination acts are difficult to use due to the pressure of the market and the existence of “black-list” databases.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1057307.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=A/HRC/4/18/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF THE RIGHT TO FREEDOM OF OPINION AND EXPRESSION, FRANK LA RUE : ADDENDUM
The adoption of excessive penalties, particularly against segments of the media critical of the authorities, has a negative impact which goes far beyond the direct damage to the media groups or journalists who are silenced. (...) The Public Revenue Office froze the assets of the group to guarantee enforcement of the financial penalties, which were extremely high considering the financial capacity of the media market in the country. Attempts to organize staggered payments were rejected. (...) Nevertheless, the Special Rapporteur noted with concern the information received from various sources that, even after the decriminalization of defamation, accusations of defamation were still made relatively frequently, particularly against the investigative segments of the media covering corruption and abuse by State authorities.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1057108.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/26/30/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
ADEQUATE HOUSING AS A COMPONENT OF THE RIGHT TO AN ADEQUATE STANDARD OF LIVING :REPORT : ADDENDUM / BY THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR, MILOON KOTHARI
Con un legado de corrupción y mala administración de los recursos estatales y locales, comprendidas la tierra, el Gobierno tiene que hacer frente a un aumento de las barriadas de tugurios, entre las que figuran las más extensas de toda el África subsahariana; la falta de acceso a servicios esenciales como el agua potable, la electricidad y el saneamiento, en particular para los segmentos más pobres de la sociedad; y el alto número de personas que viven con el VIH/SIDA. (...) The Kenyan economy has seen a downward trend since 1990, partly due to the suspension of foreign aid by the donor community.2 In parallel, there has been a failure of the Governments in the past to respect and protect the right to adequate housing, including access to essential services such as potable water, electricity and sanitation, and to land, particularly with respect to the poorest segments of society, including in informal settlements. (...) Ironically, slum-dwellers and others residing in informal settlements - often the poorest segments of society - pay exorbitant prices for water.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1051453.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...DS=E/CN.4/2005/48/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN, ITS CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES, RASHIDA MANJOO :ADDENDUM
Even with respect to earned income, the disadvantage of women with limitations is evident: over 70 per cent of these women, compared with 48.7 per cent of men with severe limitations, have an income ranging between 0 and 15,000 per year (ISTAT, EUSILC Survey, 2010). 20 According to the results of a study conducted on data from the labour force in 2006, the rate of foreign women who have the chance to work in segments characterized by lower worker skills is about eight times higher than that of Italian women, while the likelihood for foreign men is “only” double if compared to Italian men (ISTAT, Foreigners in the labour market, 2009). (...) In spite of existing/progressive legal and policy frameworks for the integration of women with disabilities, in practice, these women are at times offered certain training programmes that lead to subordinate positions and inferior roles in the labour market and, consequently, to lower paid jobs.52 IV. (...) Other legislation provides protection in areas such as the right to life, health, assistance and social integration,66 inclusion in the labour market and social protection,67 access to work68 and judicial protection in case of discrimination.69 3.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1046568.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/20/16/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
UNITED NATIONS DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF PEASANTS AND OTHER PEOPLE WORKING IN RURAL AREAS :DRAFT RESOLUTION / ALGERIA, BOLIVIA (PLURINATIONAL STATE OF), CUBA, ECUADOR, EL SALVADOR, EGYPT, HAITI, KENYA, NICARAGUA, PARAGUAY, PHILIPPINES, SOUTH AFRICA, TOGO, VENEZUELA (BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF), STATE OF PALESTINE
For the purposes of the present Declaration, a peasant is any person who engages or who seeks to engage alone, or in association with others or as a community, in small-scale agricultural production for subsistence and/or for the market, and who relies significantly, though not necessarily exclusively, on family or household labour and other non-monetized ways of organizing labour, and who has a special dependency on and attachment to the land. 2. (...) States shall also ensure that all segments of society, in particular parents and children, are informed, have access to nutritional education and are supported in the use of basic knowledge on child nutrition and the advantages of breastfeeding. 4. (...) States shall take appropriate measures to strengthen the resilience of peasants and other people working in rural areas against natural disasters and other severe disruptions, such as market failures. 6. States shall take appropriate measures to ensure fair wages and equal remuneration for work of equal value, without distinction of any kind.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1028538.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/39/L.16&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods