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The last twenty years have seen some notable suc- cesses around access to medicines, especially for anti-retroviral medicines (ARVs) to treat HIV, according to Kees de Joncheere, WHO Department of Essential Medicines. (...) One possibility for increasing access to patented pharmaceuticals is for countries to take advantage of flexibilities in the intellectual property system, particu- larly those clarified in the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health. (...) Some LDCs were almost 10 times more dependent on a narrow range of suppliers than the global average. While tariffs on medicines and ingredients for medicines had fallen overall, there were some high tariffs that fed into higher costs of production and distribution of medicines.
Language:English
Score: 1157850.5 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...efTrilateralSympOct2015WEB.pdf
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14redwood_e.PDF 1 “ADVANTAGES AND RISKS OF DIFFERENTIAL PRICING FOR PRESCRIPTION DRUGS” Presentation at World Health Organisation-World Trade Organisation Workshop, Høsbjør, Norway - 9th April 2001 © Heinz Redwood 2001 Differential pricing of prescription drugs is not a new phenomenon. (...) One of the main obstacles that needs to be overcome in order to make such differential prices workable, is ‘reflux’ trade: leakage and re-importation, especially of patented drugs, back into the full-price markets of North America, Europe, and Japan. The first and main advantage of differential pricing as a contribution to problem solving is simply that more patients would gain access to essential medicines if they were cheaper. (...) The ultimate step is donations which have their advantages but are not generally welcome as the sole vehicle of the pharmaceutical industry’s contribution.
Language:English
Score: 1155780.1 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...resentations_e/14redwood_e.pdf
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New additions to the WHO Essential Medicines List related to TB treatment Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) The combination of rifapentine and isoniazid has advantages over other available options in terms of likelihood to complete treatment, safety, and acceptability to end-users. (...) Dr Mario Raviglione, Director of WHO’s Global TB Programme, noted that having the “EML better equipped with the inclusion of these medicines will complement current WHO policies that guide Member States to design effective TB treatment regimens, drive the attention on the need for further research and active pharmacovigilance on these new medicines, and stimulate much-needed interest of drug manufacturers to invest more in the development of new anti-TB medicines and their registration in countries”.
Language:English
Score: 1153705.8 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...s-list-related-to-tb-treatment
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This renewed interest is laudable because over 400 million people worldwide lack access to health care, medicines and diagnostics according to recent WHO and World Bank reports. (...) The ADP partners- UNDP, TDR (the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases) and PATH work on these critical areas based on their comparative advantages.  UNDP supports countries to develop an enabling legal and policy framework that improves access and delivery of health technology, WHO-TDR supports countries to improve their capacity in implementation research and PATH supports countries to address issues related to resource allocation, procurement and supply chain.  (...) In 2016, ADP supported the ministry of health to revise the national medicines policy. The national medicines policy (NMP) provides the needed framework to ensure ‘universal, equitable and sustainable access to priority, efficacious and safe medicines and other health technologies of acceptable quality for all people living in Ghana’.  
Language:English
Score: 1152751.2 - https://www.undp.org/ghana/blo...-approaches-solve-old-problems
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It is hoped that the patent incentive might lead to social benefits like better medicines, cleaner water, safer automobiles, and faster computers. An elaborate web of treaties connects national patent systems into a global patent system. Taking advantage of the fact that newer patents make reference to (“cite”) older patents, we use a powerful new approach to construct a worldwide patent citation network that encompasses data from all major jurisdictions. Based on the PATSTAT database maintained by the European Patent Office and a novel big data network method of analysis, our resulting map of the global patent system is composed of more than 100 million patent documents linked together by almost 250,000,000 citations. One of the advantages of our “eigenvector” approach is that each and every patent and patent application in the network can be assigned a relative and objective importance score, allowing patents, patent portfolios, firms and institutions, inventors, technologies, and even countries to be directly compared with one another or ranked.
Language:English
Score: 1151829.5 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...e/trips_e/ipseminaserie2_e.pdf
Data Source: un
Organic Agriculture: 亚洲(不丹、印度、尼泊尔和斯里兰卡) العربية 中文 english français Español 粮农组织主页 有机农业主页 职责和报告 术语表 ORCA 门户 出版物 专题内容 国家数据 重大事件 项目 相关链接 常见问题解答 联系方式 亚洲(不丹、印度、尼泊尔和斯里兰卡)   亚洲(不丹、印度、尼泊尔和斯里兰卡) Title : Organic Production of Underutilized Medicinal, Aromatic and Natural Dye Plants Programme for Sustainable Rural Livelihoods in South Asia Objective : The overall objective of the Programme is to sustainably improve the livelihoods of the rural poor in South Asia through the development of diversified production chains for organically produced Medicinal, Aromatic and Natural Dye Plants (MADPs) and certified collected MADPs. (...) The specific purposes of the Programme are to: empower the rural poor and rural communities through participatory involvement, training and equitable benefit distribution, including fair trade principles, in all MADP and related organic production processes and outputs; develop, strengthen and test the full production chain for organic MADP products from production, collection and value-adding to certification, market research and marketing through appropriate small and medium enterprises (SMEs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and information and communication networks; and develop, implement and test/verify a fully transparent and traceable quality management programme with certification for organic production, responsible collection and other highquality international trade parameters to enable long-term marketing advantages, including export and local health care.    
Language:English
Score: 1148575.7 - https://www.fao.org/organicag/...rust-fund-projects/oa-asia/zh/
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TB: Catch up and reclaim the advantage Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific Countries Countries in the WHO South-East Asia Region: Bangladesh Bhutan Democratic People’s Republic of Korea India Indonesia Maldives Myanmar Nepal Sri Lanka Thailand Timor-Leste When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. South-East Asia Home Health topics All health topics » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Popular topics >>   Immunization Infant and young child feeding Health financing Health workforce   Health data and health information systems Traditional medicine Essential Medicines Tuberculosis  Featured topic >> Infant and young child feeding ©WHO/Christopher Black A health worker is feeding a baby with mashed food © Credits Our work Vaccine preventable disease>> Noncommunicable disease and Mental Health>> Universal health coverage>> Research and Innovation>> Resources>> Publications Data Flagships News Newsroom >> News releases Media Statements Feature stories Opinion Editorials World Health Day 2022 News releases World Health Day 2022 Featured story >> Step up efforts to eliminate measles: WHO © WHO SEARO/ Mehak Sethi © Credits Emergencies Outbreaks and emergencies COVID-19 Emergency Operations Country Health Emergency Preparedness & IHR Infectious Hazard Management Health Emergency Information & Risk Assessment Thailand becomes first in SEAR with WHO classified emergency medical team Health Ministers Commit to Emergency Preparedness Major Earthquake Hits Sulawesi, Indonesia About Overview >> Our focus Where we work Governance >> Regional Director Regional Committee Seventy-fourth Session of the Regional Committee Seventy-fifth Session of the Regional Committee Partnerships >> Collaborating Centers Careers >> Contact Us >> From vision to results: advancing health for billions in the South-East Asia Region  Home / News / Opinion Editorials / Detail / TB: Catch up and reclaim the advantage TB: Catch up and reclaim the advantage 24 March 2021 Intensified action is needed to maintain the Region’s winning trajectory against TB  The WHO South-East Asia Region is at a critical moment in its quest to end TB by 2030. (...) WHO’s continued support to all countries in the Region to not only hold the line against TB but to catch up and reclaim the advantage will be steadfast, as it must be. The clock is ticking on our 2030 goal.
Language:English
Score: 1146355.9 - https://www.who.int/southeasta...h-up-and-reclaim-the-advantage
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So in the early 80s, we launched a campaign under the motto “Leprosy is curable” and developed a calendar blister pack for MDT drugs, which contained the high dose of rifampicin – to be taken once a month – together with dose units for the two other drugs, which are taken daily. This had the advantage that patients had to go to their health centers once a month to exchange the used pack for a new one. (...) This novel treatment is especially indicated for uncomplicated malaria where drug resistance is a problem. The advantages over existing treatments are that it requires a relatively short treatment time for a cure and that no resistance has been reported to date. (...) The actual transaction prices for COARTEM( are subject to an unconditional negotiation between the interested partners. We do not see any advantage in developing a general formula, to determine differential prices, because every case and every transaction or group of transactions is different and must be freely negotiable. 5.
Language:English
Score: 1146084.4 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...esentations_e/23itschner_e.doc
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So in the early 80s, we launched a campaign under the motto “Leprosy is curable” and developed a calendar blister pack for MDT drugs, which contained the high dose of rifampicin – to be taken once a month – together with dose units for the two other drugs, which are taken daily. This had the advantage that patients had to go to their health centers once a month to exchange the used pack for a new one. (...) This novel treatment is especially indicated for uncomplicated malaria where drug resistance is a problem. The advantages over existing treatments are that it requires a relatively short treatment time for a cure and that no resistance has been reported to date. (...) The actual transaction prices for COARTEM are subject to an unconditional negotiation between the interested partners. We do not see any advantage in developing a general formula, to determine differential prices, because every case and every transaction or group of transactions is different and must be freely negotiable. 5.
Language:English
Score: 1146084.4 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...esentations_e/23itschner_e.pdf
Data Source: un
(costing possibly $14-21,000 per obese pilot per year) The Role of Preventative Medicine in Regulatory Aviation Medicine: An Airlines View What are the types of wellbeing initiatives? (...) Can we see the personal, ethical, social, financial and business advantage in promoting a healthier lifestyle? In an industry that prides and indeed comforts itself that safety is seen as being of paramount importance in all operational considerations, is it far fetched to postulate that there could be a direct relationship between a healthier lifestyle and a better safety profile for pilots? (...) (UK CAA AMC, EASA Part-Med) The Role of Preventative Medicine in Regulatory Aviation Medicine:- An Airlines View The Role of Preventative Medicine in Regulatory Aviation Medicine: An Airlines View Seems the right thing to do to promote wellbeing in all employees including pilots.
Language:English
Score: 1143593.4 - https://www.icao.int/safety/av....%20(Dr%20Tim%20Stevenson).pdf
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