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Total income increased by 3 per cent, from $423 million in 2010 to $436 million in 2011. Total expenditures increased by 8 per cent, from $344 million to $373 million. (...) Total expenditures, including support costs, increased to $53 million, from $52 million in 2010. The resource balance available at the end of 2011 was $34 million, compared to $31 million in 2010 (and $38 million in 2009). (...) In 2011, UNDP spent $31 million ($33 million in 2010), including $15 million ($11 million in 2010) in other resources.
Language:English
Score: 444129.25 - https://www.undp.org/sites/g/f...-session/English/dp2012-17.doc
Data Source: un
On the basis of that study, the accrued liability estimates for UNCDF are $11 million; UNIFEM, $20 million; and UNDP, $430 million, totalling $461 million. (...) Total income increased by 7 per cent from $394 million in 2009 to $423 million. Total expenditures increased by 8 per cent from $318 million to $344 million. (...) In 2010, UNDP spent $33 million (2009: $39 million), including $11 million (2009: $10 million) in other resources.
Language:English
Score: 444010.06 - https://www.undp.org/sites/g/f...-session/english/dp2011-33.doc
Data Source: un
END   UNHCR 2020 Global Trends Report – key data: 82.4 million people forcibly displaced globally (79.5 million in 2019) – a 4 per cent increase 26.4 million refugees (26.0 million in 2019) including: 20.7 million refugees under UNHCR’s mandate (20.4 million in 2019) 5.7 million Palestine refugees under UNRWA’s mandate (5.6 million in 2019) 48.0 million internally displaced people (45.7 million in 2019) 4.1 million asylum-seekers (4.1 million in 2019) 3.9 million Venezuelans displaced abroad (3.6 million in 2019) 2020 is the ninth year of uninterrupted rise in forced displacement worldwide. Today, one per cent of humanity is displaced and there are twice as many forcibly displaced people than in 2011 when the total was just under 40 million. More than two thirds of all people who fled abroad came from just five countries: Syria (6.7 million), Venezuela (4.0 million), Afghanistan (2.6 million), South Sudan (2.2 million) and Myanmar (1.1 million). (...) For the seventh year in a row, Turkey hosted the largest refugee population worldwide (3.7 million refugees), followed by Colombia (1.7 million, including Venezuelans displaced abroad), Pakistan (1.4 million), Uganda (1.4 million) and Germany (1.2 million).
Language:English
Score: 443975.44 - https://www.unhcr.org/tr/en/29...d-of-soaring-displacement.html
Data Source: un
UNHCR 2020 Global Trends Report – key data: 82.4 million people forcibly displaced globally (79.5 million in 2019) – a 4 per cent increase 26.4 million refugees (26.0 million in 2019) including: 20.7 million refugees under UNHCR’s mandate (20.4 million in 2019) 5.7 million Palestine refugees under UNRWA’s mandate (5.6 million in 2019) 48.0 million internally displaced people (45.7 million in 2019) 4.1 million asylum-seekers (4.1 million in 2019) 3.9 million Venezuelans displaced abroad (3.6 million in 2019) 2020 is the ninth year of uninterrupted rise in forced displacement worldwide. Today, one per cent of humanity is displaced and there are twice as many forcibly displaced people than in 2011 when the total was just under 40 million. More than two thirds of all people who fled abroad came from just five countries: Syria (6.7 million), Venezuela (4.0 million), Afghanistan (2.6 million), South Sudan (2.2 million) and Myanmar (1.1 million). (...) For the seventh year in a row, Turkey hosted the largest refugee population worldwide (3.7 million refugees), followed by Colombia (1.7 million, including Venezuelans displaced abroad), Pakistan (1.4 million), Uganda (1.4 million) and Germany (1.2 million).
Language:English
Score: 443975.44 - https://www.unhcr.org/th/en/ca...egory/who-we-are-en/figures-en
Data Source: un
UNHCR 2020 Global Trends Report – key data: 82.4 million people forcibly displaced globally (79.5 million in 2019) – a 4 per cent increase 26.4 million refugees (26.0 million in 2019) including: 20.7 million refugees under UNHCR’s mandate (20.4 million in 2019) 5.7 million Palestine refugees under UNRWA’s mandate (5.6 million in 2019) 48.0 million internally displaced people (45.7 million in 2019) 4.1 million asylum-seekers (4.1 million in 2019) 3.9 million Venezuelans displaced abroad (3.6 million in 2019) 2020 is the ninth year of uninterrupted rise in forced displacement worldwide. Today, one per cent of humanity is displaced and there are twice as many forcibly displaced people than in 2011 when the total was just under 40 million. More than two thirds of all people who fled abroad came from just five countries: Syria (6.7 million), Venezuela (4.0 million), Afghanistan (2.6 million), South Sudan (2.2 million) and Myanmar (1.1 million). (...) For the seventh year in a row, Turkey hosted the largest refugee population worldwide (3.7 million refugees), followed by Colombia (1.7 million, including Venezuelans displaced abroad), Pakistan (1.4 million), Uganda (1.4 million) and Germany (1.2 million).
Language:English
Score: 443975.44 - https://www.unhcr.org/th/en/28...d-of-soaring-displacement.html
Data Source: un
Europe added the second largest number during this period (23 million or 1 million per year), followed by Asia (21 million or slightly less than 1 million per year). (...) Europe added the second largest number of international migrants between 2000 and 2013 (16 million or 1.2 million per year), followed by Northern America (13 million or 1 million per year). (...) Asia hosted the largest number of refugees in 2013 (10.4 million), followed by Africa (2.9 million), Europe (1.5 million) (figure 7).
Language:English
Score: 443858.15 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...pfacts/PopFacts_2013-2_new.pdf
Data Source: un
This includes commitments of US$ 245 000.  This illustrates the operational capacity of the Programme to deliver the 2016-2017 workplan (US$ 25.2 million undesignated and US$ 8.3 million designated planned activities) whilst implementing the 2014-2015 project delays (US$ 6.2 million) during the first quarter of 2016. 8 TDR 2016-2017 FINANCIAL REPORT AND OUTLOOK 2018-2021 2018-2019 Outlook: US$ 40 million scenario financed and implementation started (figures 6-8) Approved budget scenarios for 2018-2019  In June 2016, JCB approved two budget scenarios for 2018-2019 based on revenue forecast of US$ 45 million o A lower scenario at US$ 40 million (US$ 30 million undesignated funds; US$ 10 million designated funds). o A higher scenario at US$ 50 million (US$ 37 million undesignated funds; US$ 13 million designated funds).  The revenue forecast for 2018-2019 presented at JCB (2017) amounted to US$ 29.4 million (US$ 26.7 million undesignated funds; US$ 2.7 million designated funds).  US$ 10.6 million funding gap was identified in order to implement the US$ 40 million budget scenario (US$ 3.3 million undesignated funds; US$ 7.3 million designated funds) Unexpected drop in undesignated contributions in October 2017  In October 2017, due to lower than expected contributions from two major contributors, the forecast revenue was adjusted to US$ 27.0 million This included US$ 25.0 million undesignated funds and US$ 2.0 million designated funds (ongoing projects only).  A US$ 13.0 million funding gap was identified to implement the US$ 40 million budget scenario (US$ 5.0 million undesignated funds and US$ 8.0 million designated funds). (...) Additional revenue of US$ 7 million was secured for the period 2017 to 2019. In addition, a number of new designated grants were confirmed, increasing the designated revenue forecast by US$ 6.7 million.  Total forecast revenue was increased to US$ 39.7 million (US$ 31.0 million undesignated; US$ 8.7 million designated) including the increased contributions received at the end of 2017. (...) In order to ensure efficiency of the current structure of TDR, a minimum of USD 40 million is required. o A lower scenario at US$ 40 million (US$ 30 million undesignated funds; US$ 10 million designated funds). o A higher scenario at US$ 50 million (US$ 33 million undesignated funds; US$ 17 million designated funds).  A funding gap of US$ 6 million has been identified to implement the US$ 40 million budget scenario (undesignated funds only).
Language:English
Score: 443817.5 - https://www.who.int/tdr/public...016-2017_outlook-2018-2021.pdf
Data Source: un
“Out” Emigration (legal) Growth Rate (Very Rapid) 296.4 million 4.1 million - 2.4 million 900,000 800,000 -275,000 -225,000 1.0 % U.S. (...) Legal Permanent Resident (LPR) Aliens (11.8 million) 32% Temporary Legal Residents (1.3 million) 3% Unauthorized Migrants (11.1 million) 30% 37.0 Million Foreign-Born in 2005 Legal Status of ImmigrantsLegal Status of Immigrants Naturalized Citizens (former LPRs) (12.8 million) 34% Mexico is Largest Source of Unauthorized, Too Mexico is Largest Source of Unauthorized, Too 11.1 Million in March 2005 Other Latin America -- 22% 2.5 million Africa & Other -- 3% 0.4 million Europe & Canada -- 6% 0.6 million Asia -- 13% 1.5 million Mexico -- 56% 6.2 million Most Unauthorized Arrived Since 1990 Most Unauthorized Arrived Since 1990 11.1 Million in March 2005 (Analytic estimates) 1995-1999 3.2 million -- 29% (650,000 per year) 1990-94 2.2 million -- 20% (440,000 per year) 1980s 1.2 million -- 11% (120,000 per year) 2000-05 4.5 million – 41% (850,000 per year) 0 250 500 750 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 Rise, Peak, Decline, & ?? (...) Citizen Children 3.1 million 64% of kids Adult Women 3.9 million 42% of Adults Adult Men 5.4 million 58% of Adults “Mixed Status” Families Common Among Unauthorized “Mixed Status” Families Common Among Unauthorized 6.6 Million Unauthorized Families No Children 59% 3.9 million families With Only Non-Citizen Children 11% 725,000 families With Both US Citizen & Non-Citizen Children 7% -- 460,000 families (“Mixed”) With Only US Citizen Children 23% 1.5 million families “Mixed” Solo Men 37% 2.4-2.5 million Solo Women 11% -- 730,000 Couples 10% -- 630,000 Other 1.5% -- 90,000 Children of Unauthorized Mostly in “Mixed Status” Families Children of Unauthorized Mostly in “Mixed Status” Families 4.9 Million Children of Unauthorized US Citizen Children with Unauthorized Siblings 13% -- 630,000 children “Mixed” Unauthorized Children Only 24% 1.2 million children Not “Mixed” Unauthorized Children with US Citizen Siblings 13% 620,000 children “Mixed” US Citizen Children Only 51% 2.6 million children “Mixed” 12% 35% 35% 36% 44% 19% 22% 43% 17% 27% 54% 33% 11% 16% 37% 16% 9% 30% Natz.Citz.
Language:English
Score: 443789.9 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...nts/pdf/other/turin/PASSEL.pdf
Data Source: un
UNICEF UNICEF/UNI322625/Al-Issa Home Programme Menu Supply Annual Report 2019 Scaling up for impact Innovation at the heart of humanitarian response From ships to schools with local innovation Warehouse app scales up to improve supply chain efficiency Scaling vaccine procurement Strengthening domestic resources to deliver life-saving commodities Keeping vaccines safe through the last mile of their journey Improving nutrition supply chains for children Responding to emergencies Scaling up supply response for global health emergencies Responding with supplies to Cyclones Idai and Kenneth Strategic prepositioning of supplies in South Sudan Scaling up construction in Yemen Working together Supply Community testimonials Strategic collaboration Supply partnerships Achieving results Major commodity groups Services Country of supplier and region of use Savings overview 2019 Annexes Annex 1 Annex 2 Annex 3a Annex 3b Annex 4 Achieving results Major commodity groups 25 June 2020 2.43 billion doses of vaccines were procured for 99 countries to reach 45 per cent of the world’s children under five years of age   49,096 tons of ready-to-use therapeutic food, 69 per cent of which was sourced in programme countries 409.7 million vitamin A treatments 56.4 million deworming tablets 553 million sachets of multiple micronutrients powder 652.8 million iron and folic acid tablets   300 million cotrimoxazole tablets (treats a range of bacterial infections, including pneumonia and bronchitis) 74 million sachets of oral rehydration salts (includes 10.8 million co-packaged ORS/zinc) 34.98 million artemisinin-based combination therapy malaria treatments 27.3 million amoxicillin pneumonia treatments for infants, reaching 38 countries 4 million packs of antiretroviral medicine to treat 190,312 adults and 30,082 children with first-line therapy for one year in 43 countries 2.6 million treatments for seasonal malaria chemoprevention to protect 655,200 children 2.2 million courses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine chemoprevention to protect 726,422 pregnant women    70,807 health kits for 57 countries 944.9 million immunization syringes 8.8 million safety boxes 4.9 million HIV rapid diagnostic tests, including 0.6 million HIV/Syphilis Combo diagnostic tests to 15 countries 4.2 million malaria rapid diagnostic tests to 19 countries   459 million water purification tablets and chlorination/flocculation sachets, which could treat 4.51 billion litres of water 2.4 million hygiene kits $126.9 million pharmaceuticals   48.1 million long-lasting insecticidal nets to 33 countries   Includes $61.3 million in solar powered systems in 37 countries   148.811 education kits for 57 countries: 95,461 standard classroom kits 33,456 recreation kits 18,674 early childhood development kits  1,220 country-specific education kits   Related topics Supply Data and reports Global More to explore Article Services In 2019, the UNICEF procurement of services reached a value of $1.192 billion. Read the story Article Country of supplier and region of use The countries from which procurement exceeded $20 million and where UNICEF supplies were used. Read the story Article Savings overview 2019 The UNICEF Supply function achieved a total of $363.3 million worth of savings for UNICEF donors and partners in 2019.
Language:English
Score: 443663.53 - https://www.unicef.org/supply/stories/major-commodity-groups
Data Source: un
UNICEF will also need US$909 million for the Syria refugee crisis, another US$334 million for the crisis inside Syria, US$484 million for the response in Yemen, and over US$356 for programmes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. (...) As part of its Humanitarian Action for Children which sets out the agency’s 2022 appeal, UNICEF plans to reach: 7.2 million children with treatment for severe acute malnutrition; 62.1 million children with measles vaccinations; 53.4 million people with access to safe water for drinking and domestic needs; 27.9 million children and caregivers with access to mental health and psychosocial support; 21.3 million children and women with access to gender-based violence risk mitigation, prevention or response interventions; 51.9 million people with safe and accessible channels to report sexual exploitation and abuse by aid workers; 77.1 million children with formal or non-formal education, including early learning; and 23.6 million households with cash assistance. With support from partners, key results in 2021 included: 2.4 million children treated for severe acute malnutrition; 5 million children and caregivers accessing mental health and psychosocial support; 34 million people provided with enough safe water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene; 22.4 million children and women receiving essential health care services in UNICEF-supported facilities; 110.7 million children accessing formal or non-formal education, including early learning; More than 812.2 million people reached through behavioral messages on disease prevention and access to health services; 3.2 million people with access to safe channels to report sexual exploitation and abuse; 8.6 million women, girls and boys accessing GBV risk mitigation, prevention or response interventions; and 14.9 million households reached with humanitarian cash transfers.
Language:English
Score: 443633.8 - https://www.unicef.org/pakista...eal-children-affected-conflict
Data Source: un