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MIDANPIRG AFS /ATN TF/6-WP/6 TENTH MEETING OF THE MIDANPIRG COMMUNICATION, NAVIGATION AND SURVEILLANCE SUB-GROUP (CNS SG/10) (Virtual Meeting, 1-3 December 2020) Daily Order of Business Day 1: 1st December 2020, 0800-1000 UTC Opening of the meeting Agenda Item 1 Adoption of the Provisional Agenda Agenda item 2 Follow-up on MIDANPIRG/17 and MSG/7 Conclusions and Decisions related to CNS Agenda Item 3 Global Developments related to CNS Agenda item 4 Outcome of the MIDAMC STG/6 Agenda item 4 Surveillance Matters • Mode S IC allocation for Military • Review the MID Region Surveillance Plan • Surveillance implementation Monitoring matrix Day 2: 2nd December 2020, 0800-1000 UTC Agenda item 4 Navigation Matters • Outcome of the Flight Inspection Webinar • Update on GNSS implementation • Navigation Minimal Operating Networks Agenda item 4 Outcome of Frequency Webinar Agenda item 5 MID Region ASBU threads prioritization table CNS related ASBU threads monitoring elements -2- Day 3: 3rd December 2020, 0800-1000 UTC Agenda item 5 MID Region ASBU threads prioritization table CNS related ASBU threads monitoring elements GANP KPIs Initial set of MID KPIs National ANS implementation planning Agenda Item 6 Review of Air Navigation Deficiencies in the CNS Field Agenda Item 7 Review of CNS ToR Agenda Item 7 Date and venue of next meeting Agenda Item 8 Any other business Review of CNS SG/10 Draft Conclusions and Decisions Meeting Closing -END- (Virtual Meeting, 1-3 December 2020)
Language:English
Score: 937851.6 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...of%20business%20CNS%20SG10.pdf
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July 2006: • Mercury in compact fluorescent lamps - 5 mg per lamp • Mercury in straight fluorescent lamps for general purposes: — halophosphate 10 mg — triphosphate with normal lifetime 5 mg — triphosphate with long lifetime 8 mg • Mercury in straight fluorescent lamps for special purposes • Mercury in other lamps not specifically mentioned Fever thermometers-1 • Households: – Non-mercury thermometers are available • Healthcare services: – One thermometer per hospital bed – Turnover rate is high – Precision of galinstan thermometer is comparable Fever thermometers-2 Sphygmomanometers • Limited use in households • Mercury devices are „gold standards” • Low impact on health and the environment – Reuse and recycling within healthcare centers – Minimal emission – Sound management of waste • Incompatibility to automatisation • Non-mercury devices are available Conclusions • Legislation in force: – Compliance with legislation in force with regard fluorescent and other lamps • Upcoming legislation: – Narrow gap between new requirements and current practices – Ban on marketing of mercury devices to the general public is supported – No strong obstacle against ban on marketing of mercury devices to professionals Hungarian aspects regarding restrictions of mercury in products European context Mercury in lamps Fever thermometers-1 Fever thermometers-2 Sphygmomanometers Conclusions
Language:English
Score: 937851.6 - https://www.who.int/ifcs/docum...nts/forums/forum5/hm_kozak.pdf
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PowerPoint Presentation CNS SG/10 Meeting Summary of Draft Decisions and Conclusions 1-3 December 2020 Draft Conclusion 10/1: MIDAMC OPERATION EFFICIENCY That, in order to enhance the MIDAMC operation efficiency, States are encouraged to: a) update their MIDAMC focal point(s); b) Register MIDAMC users on the EUR AMC as external AMC operator, in coordination with the MIDAMC Team by 1 February 2021; c) note that the MIDAMC web application will be withdrawn by 1 March 2021;and d) nominate SMEs to join the MIDAMC Team and participate in MIDAMC operation training. (...) Draft Decision 10/2: ESTABLISHMENT OF AD-HOC ACTION GROUP TO DEVELOP A TEMPLATE FOR NAVIGATION MINIMAL OPERATING NETWORKS (NAV. MON) PLAN That, the NAV. (...) Jehad Al-Faqir (IATA) ICAMIDO Office Draft Conclusion 10/4: FLIGHT INSPECTION AND PROCEDURE VALIDATION SYMPOSIUM That, a Flight Inspection and Procedure Validation Symposium be organized in 2021.
Language:English
Score: 936457.5 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...d%20Conclusions%2017%20Dec.pdf
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Joint collaboration throughout the planning and execution of full spectrum operations, maximize effectiveness, and minimize operational risk. Civil-Military Collaboration Current Operations The current airspace structure no longer satisfies all the requirements and needs of civil and military users. (...) Airspace Management (military perspective) In order to optimize the use of airspace for all stakeholders, airspace management procedures must be subject to common approval, in all planning processes from the beginning, constrains or limitations could thus be minimized. The main Airspace Management tool is coordination, to eliminate the conflicting interests of military and civil aviation and use the airspace in Flexible manner. (...) Conclusions  Military airspace requirements are not static; they are dynamic and need to be adapted to support the aerial capabilities of future aircraft and weapon systems.  To accommodate defense and security needs, sufficient airspace is to be provided for military utilization.  The common goal of all efforts is to meet the requirements of all airspace users to the maximum extent possible.
Language:English
Score: 932272.6 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...20military%20view%20%20PPT.pdf
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Update on the headquarters building renovation project This GB document is printed in limited numbers to minimize the environmental impact of the ILO's activities and processes, contribute to climate neutrality and improve efficiency. (...) The occurrence of safety and health issues has remained minimal, and the good relations with the local worksite inspectors have been maintained. 4. (...) In conclusion, all parties agreed to review the required specifications and the financial requirements for perimeter security in close consultation with all relevant stakeholders. 11.
Language:English
Score: 932272.6 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...eetingdocument/wcms_577871.pdf
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. – A worst case scenario, in which there was minimal advance notification of the suspect case and the incident occurred at night on a public holiday. UK organisation of public health provision at ports of entry (POE) • National Health Service: – Public Health England (similar bodies for devolved authorities – Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland) – 24 hour cover by ‘on call’ public health physician on a regional basis, including responsibility for any POE within the region – No medical centres at airports – First aid provision (ambulance paramedics at Heathrow and Gatwick) – Urgent medical care provided by calling emergency ambulance, transfer to local NHS hospital • Port Health Services: – Responsibility of local authority – 24 hour cover for POE within authority boundary – Usually provided by environmental health officers, not physicians Procedure for suspect case inbound to UK airport – risk assessment • Cabin crew identify suspect case on basis of IATA guidelines • Aircraft captain notifies handling Air Traffic Service, who in turn notify destination Air Traffic Service of suspect case • Destination Air Traffic Service contact duty officer for port health authority • Duty officer assesses case in accordance with SOP – further information sought from aircraft via handling agency or airline operations • If concerned, contacts duty public health physician for advice • If still concerned, ambulance called to collect patient from aircraft and take them to local NHS hospital for assessment (rarely directly to regional infectious diseases unit) • Ambulance service notified of risk assessment, such that crew can take appropriate precautions – almost always limited to routine ‘universal precautions’ measures Procedure for suspect case inbound to UK airport – aircraft arrival • Aircraft parking: – Designated airport stand unrealistic (logistically +/- ac type) – Aircraft parked on- or off-pier stand as scheduled • Disembarkation: – Remaining passengers disembarked normally to avoid delays – Ambulance crew board after other passengers have disembarked to assess casualty and transfer to hospital – Rarely ambulance crew may board before other passengers disembarked if they are already at the stand and ill passenger thought to require immediate emergency medical care • Other passengers: – Most airports have no facility for holding arriving passengers – Not legal to detain other passengers unless over-riding public health requirement can be demonstrated (rarely, if ever, other than during outbreak) Procedure for suspect case inbound to UK airport – follow up • Contact tracing: – If assessment prior to arrival suggested possible need for subsequent contact tracing, airline would be asked to arrange for passengers in adjacent seats (usually index case row plus 2 rows in front and behind) to complete Passenger Locator Cards (PLC) – If not possible or request after landing, airline would be asked to provide available contact details for these passengers from their seating and reservations systems • Aircraft cleaning: – Most airlines would follow IATA guidelines and would also have procedures for dealing with spilled body fluids (blood, vomit etc) – No public health requirements for any aircraft cleaning except for spilled body fluids Procedure for suspect case inbound to UK airport – follow up • Baggage: – Patient’s hand baggage and other personal effects taken to hospital with them; any uncollected hold baggage dealt with by routine airport or airline procedures • Communication: – Information for passengers: generic pre-prepared public health information e.g. on what to do if they feel unwell in the next few days, should be available, and offered to passengers on disembarkation – Information for airline and airport staff: management should also be prepared to respond to concerns of flying crew, ground staff – Media: public health departments should be prepared to respond proactively to any media enquiries, either at the time of the incident or if subsequent investigation leads to a diagnosis of significant illness (significant to the media, even if not of public health concern) Summary - potential sources of delay • Aircraft arrival: – Should be no delay attributable to public health if aircraft lands normally at destination airport and proceeds to routinely allocated stand • Passenger disembarkation: – Should be no delay attributable to public health if remaining passengers disembark normally – Should be minimal delay attributable to public health if passenger requires immediate emergency medical care and removed first by waiting ambulance crew using only universal precautions • Contact tracing: – Should be no delay attributable to public health if PLCs only requested if they can be completed prior to aircraft arrival, or minimal delay if available at gate and airline asks affected passengers to complete prior to disembarkation Potential sources of delay • Passenger border and customs control: – Should be no delay attributable to public health as passengers processed normally • Baggage collection: – Should be no delay attributable to public health as baggage processed normally • Aircraft cleaning / turnround: – Should be minimal delay attributable to public health due to removal of ill passenger by ambulance crew following disembarkation of other passengers – Should be no other delay attributable to public health as no additional requirements for aircraft cleaning Working group conclusions Best case scenario: • Notification of the suspect case via the air traffic services at least one hour before arrival of the aircraft and during normal working hours • There should be no delay attributable to passengers or the aircraft / airport operation as a consequence of the public health response Working group conclusions Worst case scenario: • Minimal advance notification of the suspect case and the incident occurs at night on a public holiday • May be some delay in contacting duty staff and in assessing the case – should normally not exceed 30 minutes • If the assessment concludes that the ill passenger should be taken to hospital, may be a delay due to the dispatch/arrival of an ambulance - should normally not exceed 15 minutes • Aircraft arrival and disembarkation of other passengers should proceed normally • Overall delay attributable to the public health response should normally not exceed one hour Working group recommendations • The benchmark for the maximum delay to aircraft and airport operations attributable to the public health authority management of a case of suspected communicable disease should be one hour • Public health authorities and operators should jointly review all incidents where the recommended benchmark standard is not achieved – aim is to identify gaps in procedures, resources or training, not to apportion blame • Aviation and public health authorities should review the recommended procedures for assessment of onboard cases of suspected communicable disease, to ensure that these are practicable within operational, security and legal constraints • Operators and public health organisations should jointly develop procedures to provide information and respond to any concerns raised by passengers, crew or ground staff in connection with the incident Any questions?
Language:English
Score: 928961.6 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...-mid3/Arrival%20procedures.pdf
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(a) Each certificate holder shall maintain, and promptly repair the pavement of, each runway, taxiway, loading ramp, and parking area on the airport which is available for air carrier use as follows: • (4) Mud, dirt, sand, loose aggregate, debris, foreign objects, rubber deposits, and other contaminants shall be removed promptly and as completely as practicable. • (b) EAC 139-26 contains standards and procedures for the maintenance and configuration of paved areas which are acceptable to the ECAA. • • 139.349 (last amended October 2013) • c) Removal of contaminants • (1) (2)(3)Slush, standing water, mud, dust, sand, oil, rubber deposits and other contaminants shall be removed from the surface of runways ,Taxiways and Aprons in use as rapidly and completely as possible to minimize accumulation. FOD presented by ECAA • 139.349 (last amended October 2013) • c) Removal of contaminants • (1) (2)(3)Slush, standing water, mud, dust, sand, oil, rubber deposits and other contaminants shall be removed from the surface of runways ,Taxiways and Aprons in use as rapidly and completely as possible to minimize accumulation. FOD presented by ECAA • 139.349 (last amended October 2013) • c) Removal of contaminants • (1) (2)(3)Slush, standing water, mud, dust, sand, oil, rubber deposits and other contaminants shall be removed from the surface of runways ,Taxiways and Aprons in use as rapidly and completely as possible to minimize accumulation. FOD presented by ECAA EAC 139-25 Chapter 3 Airport Surface Inspections • Frequency of Inspection • 3.1.1 Inspections of the movement areas should be regular and as frequent as possible. (...) FOD presented by ECAA FOD presented by ECAA Conclusion “ECAA” ANALYSES THE “OCCURENCES/INCIDENT, and notices that:- 1) THE NUMBER OF OCCURENCES INVESTIGATED DURING THE LAST YEARS DUE TO (FOD) IS MINIMIZED (SUCCESS)* *ONLY (ONE ON 2012) –REFERENCE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION REPORT 2) MORE SPECIAL ATTENTION IS MADE FOR THE INCREASING NUMBER OF (BIRD STRIKE) INCIDENTS RELATIVE TO FOD INCIDENTS** ** 15BIRD STRIKE /293 TOTAL INCIDENT DURING 2012 FOD presented by ECAA • ECAA activities to ensure implementation of the previous requirements :- 1.
Language:English
Score: 928961.6 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...ction%20program%20-%20ECAA.pdf
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The meeting is invited to take note of these Conclusions and Decisions and discuss ways and means of enhancing the follow-up actions as required in order to ensure the maintenance of safety. (...) The Meeting therefore developed Conclusion 14/1 on bird reduction as follows:- CONCLUSION 14/1: BIRD HAZARD CONTROL AND REDUCTION That: a) States facing bird hazard problems conduct environmental and ornithological studies to make sure that dispersal and control methods selected are appropriate, efficient and cost effective. (...) It therefore formulated the following Conclusion 14/4. CONCLUSION 14/4 : CERTIFICATION OF AERODROMES a) States which have not done so take appropriate measures to develop an action plan aimed at implementing the requirement for aerodrome certification in accordance with Annex 14, Volume 1 paragraph 1.3; and b) States ensure that personnel that would be involved in the certification process – in particular, aerodrome inspectors and auditors – be provided with appropriate training. 5.2 A survey conducted recently by the ESAF Regional Office has indicated that progress in the ESAF Region is still quite minimal.
Language:English
Score: 927636.5 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...005/AOPSG6/AOPSG6wp01-1_en.pdf
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Microsoft Word - SAT21 WP 02 APPENDIX A- ATM SAT/21 WP/02/ APP‐A        1 APPENDIX A-ATM Status of Conclusions and Decisions related to SAT/20 Meeting pertaining to ATM field Agenda Item 2: Air Traffic Management (ATM) Conclusions and Decisions Implementation Status Remarks Decision 20/01: Traffic Statistic of the EUR-SAM Area That, Air traffic statistics that are needed for analysis to assess the performance of services provided in the EUR-SAM corridor is considered adequate; and Still Valid SATMA to provide feedback Conclusion 20/02: Improvement in quality and reliability of data That, EUR/SAM States/ANSPs are urged to improve the quality and reliability of the data they submit to SATMA by providing additional data on fleet capabilities including ADS-C/CPDLC connection and registration number. Still Valid Decision 20/03: Provision of Correct Addresses That, SAT Member States and SATMA provide correct addresses and update the contact information regularly to ensure timely submission of data and statistical analysis. a) by SAT/18 (Decision 18/02) (Appendix I refers) and; b) Report quaternary to ASECNA, Team leader of Task 3 of the Work Programme of the SAT CNS/WG on the results of the mitigation action taken to minimize the loss of Flight Plans. Decision 20/04: EUR/SAM CORRIDOR DATA FOR RISK ASSESSMENT That, SAT/21 WP/02/ APP‐A        2 Taking into account the need for accurate traffic data for airspace planning, safety assessment and statistics in the EUR/SAM Corridor, Brazil, Cape Verde, Spain and Senegal are urged to collect and submit the 2015 Air Traffic Movement data for a period of six months (July‐Dec), in accordance with the format provided at SATMA website www.satmasat.com before February 2016; Conclusion 20/05: Provision of LHD information and causes That, To ensure that the outcome of Safety Assessment that are based on the Collision Risk Model conducted for the EUR/SAM region is more representative of the prevalent risks, EUR/ SAM States/ANSPs are urged to provide all available information related to Large Height Deviations including their duration and causes to SATMA. EUR-SAM Corridor Aircraft Equipage Survey Conclusion 20/06: EUR-SAM Corridor Aircraft Equipage Survey That, a) States of operators that have not done so yet are urged to develop and publish the RNP 4 (PBN) Regulatory Approval process. b) IATA is urged to encourage airlines that have not done yet to initiate RNP 4 approval process for their eligible fleets.
Language:English
Score: 925606.1 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...2002%20APPENDIX%20A-%20ATM.pdf
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. • A European leader in certain areas of infection control • Employs more than 560 employees worldwide • Subsidiaries in Austria, Benelux, France, Italy, Poland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Malaysia and Singapore • Turnover 2007: Ca. 130 M € • In 1996 it was one of the first chemical companies in Germany to be validated according to EMAS • Certified according to ISO 14001 • Member of the Air Liquide group 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 6 Located near Hamburg, Germany • Further information: www.schuelke.com 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 7 Hamburg 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 8 Important facts for disinfection • Disinfectants make an active contribution to the fight against infections and therefore protect the health and the lives of humans • The use of disinfectants in Europe is strictly controlled by a large variety of regulations, e.g. for drugs, medical devices and biocides • As a result of their biocidal nature, disinfectants are often hazardous substances and can have an adverse effect on the environment • Disinfectants are consumables 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 9 Classical approach as manufacturer Objective • Manufacture and sell disinfectants Strategy • Develop highly effective disinfectants • Increase turnover and profit by expanding the usage of disinfection at customer‘s site Problem • Customer is on his own with • Right choice and application • Impact on employee safety • Fulfillment of legal requirements • Adverse environmental effects 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 10 Schülke‘s approach Objective • Expert for implementing and maintaining high-level hygiene conditions Strategy • Increase turnover and profit by providing services, consultation and reorganization of related customer processes as well as sales of necessary disinfectants and application tools • Develop highly effective disinfectants Benefits • Good hygiene conditions • Reduction of infection rate • Safe handling of disinfectants in accordance with legal requirements • Minimizing adverse effects on the environment 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 11 Foundation of OPAL (1999) • Consultancy for hygiene and quality management • Academy for education and training of hospital staff 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 12 Application support • Intensive customer consultation regarding selection, dosage and dosing tools of the right disinfectant 100 [%] 50 200 Performance Concentration Waste 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 13 Customer support • Customer consultation to fulfill legal requirements related to hygiene • Hygiene regulations • Safety and chemical regulations • Environmental protection • Providing service tools • Hygiene plan • Disinfection plan • Skin protection plan • Comprehensive and updated information regarding hygiene issues via Internet with 24 hours availability 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 14 Availabilty of information 24 hours a day • Comprehensive and updated information regarding hygiene issues via Internet 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 15 Service tools – disinfection plan 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 16 Service tools – Skin protection plan 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 17 In preparation: Research project Taking over responsibility for hygiene conditions in a German hospital for two years • Providing service • Training of staff • Making decisions regarding the use of disinfectants • Implementing processes • Monitoring key performance indicators Project partners: • University Medical Center, Freiburg • Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (German Federal Foundation for the Environment) 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 18 Conclusion Abstraction of the business objective can help enterprises to adapt to future requirements early and to minimize adverse effects in terms of safety and environmental protection. 03.09.2008 | | Schülke & Mayr GmbH | Seite 19 Conclusion Thank you for your attention !
Language:English
Score: 924384.5 - https://www.who.int/ifcs/docum...ms/forum6/ppt_subst_streek.pdf
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