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Support healthy habits: Sleep and eating well can positively influence anxious feelings, as we often feel exhausted after feeling anxious for prolonged periods of time. Experts recommend nine to 12 hours of sleep a night for 6- to 12-year-olds. Teens need eight to 10 hours a night. To protect sleep time, limit screen time at night and avoid keeping digital devices in the bedroom.
Language:English
Score: 1104220.1 - https://www.unicef.org/parenti.../mental-health/what-is-anxiety
Data Source: un
Their homes were destroyed because of the bombing in 2015. 49-year-old Mahdi Hassan feels no longer safe to sleep in the house, where he has been living for years. He lives in the house with the family of his nephew. “I prefer to sleep by the entrance as the inside rooms have cracks. So I sleep here, pointing out at the entrance, where I feel safe,” says Hassan who appeals to everyone to help them.
Language:English
Score: 1098762.4 - https://www.unicef.org/yemen/s...ns-families-living-sanaa-slums
Data Source: un
Housing Standards Housing should ensure “structural safety and reasonable levels of decency, hygiene and comfort”.11 The undertaking should ensure the following: a) a separate bed for each worker; b) adequate headroom, providing full and free movement, of not less than 203 centimetres; c) the minimum inside dimensions of a sleeping space should be at least 198 centimetres by 80 centimetres; d) beds should not be arranged in tiers of more than two; e) bedding materials should be reason- ably comfortable; f) bedding and bedframe materials should be designed to deter vermin; g) separate accommodation of the sexes; h) adequate natural light during the day- time and adequate artificial light; i) a reading lamp for each bed; j) adequate ventilation to ensure suffi- cient movement of air in all conditions of weather and climate; k) heating where appropriate; l) adequate supply of safe potable water; m) adequate sanitary facilities (see below); n) adequate drainage; o) adequate furniture for each worker to secure his or her belongings, such as a ventilated clothes locker which can be locked by the occupant to ensure privacy; p) common dining rooms, canteens or mess rooms, located away from the sleeping areas; q) appropriately situated and furnished laundry facilities; r) reasonable access to telephone or other modes of communications, with any charges for the use of these serv- ices being reasonable in amount; and 11 R. 115, paragraph 19. Workers’ housing s) rest and recreation rooms and health facilities, where not otherwise avail- able in the community. In workers’ sleeping rooms the floor area should not be less than 7.5 square metres in rooms accommodating two persons; 11.5 square metres in rooms accommodating three persons; or 14.5 square metres in rooms accommodating four persons. (...) As far as practicable, sleeping rooms should be arranged so that shifts are separated and that no workers working during the day share a room with workers on night shifts.
Language:English
Score: 1083091.3 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...ts/publication/wcms_116344.pdf
Data Source: un
Housing Standards Housing should ensure “structural safety and reasonable levels of decency, hygiene and comfort”.11 The undertaking should ensure the following: a) a separate bed for each worker; b) adequate headroom, providing full and free movement, of not less than 203 centimetres; c) the minimum inside dimensions of a sleeping space should be at least 198 centimetres by 80 centimetres; d) beds should not be arranged in tiers of more than two; e) bedding materials should be reason- ably comfortable; f) bedding and bedframe materials should be designed to deter vermin; g) separate accommodation of the sexes; h) adequate natural light during the day- time and adequate artificial light; i) a reading lamp for each bed; j) adequate ventilation to ensure suffi- cient movement of air in all conditions of weather and climate; k) heating where appropriate; l) adequate supply of safe potable water; m) adequate sanitary facilities (see below); n) adequate drainage; o) adequate furniture for each worker to secure his or her belongings, such as a ventilated clothes locker which can be locked by the occupant to ensure privacy; p) common dining rooms, canteens or mess rooms, located away from the sleeping areas; q) appropriately situated and furnished laundry facilities; r) reasonable access to telephone or other modes of communications, with any charges for the use of these serv- ices being reasonable in amount; and 11 R. 115, paragraph 19. Workers’ housing s) rest and recreation rooms and health facilities, where not otherwise avail- able in the community. In workers’ sleeping rooms the floor area should not be less than 7.5 square metres in rooms accommodating two persons; 11.5 square metres in rooms accommodating three persons; or 14.5 square metres in rooms accommodating four persons. (...) As far as practicable, sleeping rooms should be arranged so that shifts are separated and that no workers working during the day share a room with workers on night shifts.
Language:English
Score: 1083091.3 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_116344.pdf
Data Source: un
Box 113 Montreal, Quebec CANADA H4Z 1M1 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1 – ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF AN AIRLINE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT ....... 1 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Passenger Health ................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2.1 Medical Advice to Airline Passengers ....................................................................................... 1 1.2.2 MEDIF and FREMEC Cards (see also Section 6.3) ................................................................. 1 1.2.3 Passenger Awareness and the Media ...................................................................................... 1 1.2.4 Care of the Incapacitated Passenger ........................................................................................ 2 1.2.5 Global Communication .............................................................................................................. 2 1.3 Employee Health .................................................................................................................................... 2 1.4 Position in the Corporate Organisation .................................................................................................. 2 1.5 Structure within the Medical Department ............................................................................................... 3 1.6 The Role of the Medical Department ..................................................................................................... 3 1.6.1 Pre-Employment Assessment ................................................................................................... 3 1.6.2 Periodic Health Assessment ..................................................................................................... 4 1.6.3 Care of Air Crew ........................................................................................................................ 4 1.6.4 Health Supervision of the Work Environment ........................................................................... 5 1.6.5 Health and Safety Education ..................................................................................................... 5 1.6.6 Accident and Emergency Services ........................................................................................... 6 1.6.7 Aircraft Accidents ...................................................................................................................... 6 1.6.8 Immunisation ............................................................................................................................. 6 1.6.9 Advice to Management ............................................................................................................. 7 SECTION 2 – THE CABIN ENVIRONMENT .............................................................................. 9 2.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 9 2.2 Pressurisation ......................................................................................................................................... 9 2.3 Ventilation ............................................................................................................................................. 10 2.4 Contaminants ....................................................................................................................................... 10 2.5 Temperature ......................................................................................................................................... 11 2.6 Relative Humidity ................................................................................................................................. 11 2.7 Passenger Space Available ................................................................................................................. 12 2.8 Noise and Vibration .............................................................................................................................. 12 2.9 Turbulence ........................................................................................................................................... 12 2.10 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................ 13 SECTION 3 – CREW MEDICAL STANDARDS ......................................................................... 19 3.1 Flight Crew Medical Standards ............................................................................................................ 19 3.1.1 Rationale for Medical Standards ............................................................................................. 19 3.1.2 Environmental and Occupational Considerations ................................................................... 19 Medical Manual 3.1.3 General and Specific Medical Considerations ........................................................................ 19 3.1.4 Medical Standards................................................................................................................... 20 3.1.5 Selection and Initial Medical Examination ............................................................................... 20 3.1.6 Responsibilities of Flight Crew ................................................................................................ 20 3.1.7 Responsibilities of the Airline Companies ............................................................................... 21 3.1.8 Responsibilities of Authorised Medical Examiners ................................................................. 21 3.2 Cabin Crew Medical Standards ............................................................................................................ 21 3.2.1 Cabin Crew Working Conditions ............................................................................................. 21 3.2.2 Aeromedical Assessment ........................................................................................................ 22 SECTION 4 – OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH FOR AIR CREW ...................................................... 23 4.1 Sleep and Circadian Rhythms .............................................................................................................. 23 4.1.1 Sleep Physiology ..................................................................................................................... 23 4.1.2 Alcohol ..................................................................................................................................... 24 4.1.3 Sleepiness ............................................................................................................................... 24 4.1.4 Circadian Rhythms .................................................................................................................. 24 4.1.5 Effect of Flight Operations ....................................................................................................... 25 4.1.6 Strategies ................................................................................................................................ 26 4.2 Medication ............................................................................................................................................ 28 4.2.1 Testing of Medication .............................................................................................................. 28 4.2.2 Assessing Treatment Needs ................................................................................................... 28 4.2.3 Principles of Prescribing .......................................................................................................... 29 4.2.4 Over-the-Counter Medications ................................................................................................ 29 4.2.5 Alternative Medicines .............................................................................................................. 29 4.3 Travel Medicine .................................................................................................................................... 30 4.3.1 Principles of Risk Minimisation – Identification of Risk ........................................................... 30 4.3.2 Vaccinations and Travel .......................................................................................................... 30 4.3.3 Important Diseases Associated with Travel ............................................................................ 31 4.3.4 Environmental Issues .............................................................................................................. 32 4.3.5 Jet Lag ..................................................................................................................................... 32 4.3.6 Obligations of Airlines to Staff ................................................................................................. 33 4.4 Cosmic Radiation ................................................................................................................................. 33 4.4.1 Types of Radiation .................................................................................................................. 34 4.4.2 Benefits and Risks of Radiation .............................................................................................. 34 4.4.3 Ionising Radiation on Earth ..................................................................................................... 34 4.4.4 Cosmic Ionising Radiation ....................................................................................................... 35 4.4.5 Measurement of Ionising Radiation......................................................................................... 36 4.4.6 Exposure to Ionising Radiation ............................................................................................... 36 4.4.7 Radioactive Cargo ................................................................................................................... 37 4.4.8 Occupational Exposure to Cosmic Radiation .......................................................................... 37 4.4.9 Risks to Health ........................................................................................................................ 38 4.4.10 Definitions ................................................................................................................................ 39 SECTION 5 – AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS ................................................................................. 41 5.1 Food and Hygiene ................................................................................................................................ 41 5.2 Disinsection .......................................................................................................................................... 41 5.2.1 Importance of Aircraft Disinsection ......................................................................................... 41 5.2.2 Legal Situation ......................................................................................................................... 42 5.2.3 General Principles of Aircraft Disinsection .............................................................................. 42 5.2.4 WHO Recommended Disinsection Procedures (update 1998) .............................................. 43 5.2.5 Considerations ........................................................................................................................ 46 5.2.6 Communication to Passengers and Crew ............................................................................... 47 5.3 Cargo .................................................................................................................................................... 47 5.3.1 Dangerous Goods ................................................................................................................... 47 5.3.2 Emergency Treatment Following Exposure to Dangerous Goods Item .................................. 48 5.3.3 Storage and Handling of Toxic and Corrosive Materials......................................................... 48 5.3.4 Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air .................................................................................... 49 SECTION 6 – PASSENGER CARE .......................................................................................... 50 6.1 Fitness to Fly ........................................................................................................................................ 50 6.1.1 Responsibility for Medical Clearance ...................................................................................... 50 6.1.2 General Guidelines for Medical Clearance ............................................................................. 50 6.1.3 Passenger Categories ............................................................................................................. 50 6.1.4 Logistics of Medical Clearance ............................................................................................... 51 6.1.5 Special Services ...................................................................................................................... 51 6.1.6 Specific Medical Guidelines .................................................................................................... 51 6.2 Airline Initial Emergency Medical Response Programmes .................................................................. 57 6.2.1 First Aid and Medical Response Kits ...................................................................................... 57 6.2.2 Cabin Crew Training ............................................................................................................... 57 6.2.3 Air to Ground Communication ................................................................................................. 58 6.2.4 Automatic External Defibrillation ............................................................................................. 58 6.2.5 Telemedicine ........................................................................................................................... 58 6.2.6 Reporting of Medical Incidents ................................................................................................ 59 6.2.7 Handling of Deaths on Board .................................................................................................. 59 6.3 Medif Forms and Fremec Cards .......................................................................................................... 59 6.3.1 IDENTIFYING PASSENGERS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY? (...) Where an employee consults an airline health professional because of personal problems or symptoms of a clinical nature, such a consultation must conform to the normal rules of medical confidentiality. (...) Medico-Legal The airline medical department must be prepared to work closely with the legal department on claims of a medical nature against the company as well as any other legal matters requiring medical input.
Language:English
Score: 1077597.1 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...rch%202015%207th%20Edition.pdf
Data Source: un
Search results Emergency relief and response Available in: English Kiswahili Programme 09/26/2019 Emergencies Supporting children during conflicts, natural disasters and epidemics Report 02/18/2021 UNICEF Kenya Country Kit 2020-22 A look at progress on children's rights in Kenya and UNICEF's response Download file (PDF, 10,57 MB) Press release 11/19/2020 UNICEF Kenya and Safaricom announce landmark partnership for children Organisations to work together on education, protection from violence and emergencies Article 12/23/2019 Kisumu floods: Wycliffe’s children stay in a camp The family moved to an evacuation camp at Nyamasau Primary School Article 12/23/2019 Kisumu floods: Esther waits to give birth Esther is expecting her first child in six weeks’ time Article 12/23/2019 Turkana floods: Charles loses the family home Gone in 60 seconds Article 12/18/2019 Turkana floods: Mama Kenya gets a helping hand UNICEF and partners have supported families with relief items Article 12/16/2019 Turkana floods: Peter sleeps out of doors Sleeping on the edge Press release 12/04/2019 UNICEF sends supplies to flood-affected children and families in 12 counties in Kenya Page 09/03/2019 Take action Want to change the lives of children in Kenya?
Language:English
Score: 1076478.1 - https://www.unicef.org/kenya/t.../emergency-relief-and-response
Data Source: un
Hi, my name is Professor Frank Oberklaid and this is my Mini Parenting Master Class.” Why do babies sleep so much? “Babies don’t know that the norm is to sleep at night-time and be awake during the day. So they sleep in bursts of three or four hours usually, wake up to have a feed and then go back to sleep. As their brain develops, there are reasons for them not to sleep because there are things to be curious about; they’re engaging with their world, parents are talking to them, reading to them.
Language:English
Score: 1070165 - https://www.unicef.org/azerbai...t-babies-every-new-parent-asks
Data Source: un
The screening for lung cancer in patients at risk is, however, still a matter of debate (223). 32 CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISEASES 7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome KEY MESSAGES Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is the most common organic sleep disorder. (...) These fi ndings underline the importance of not viewing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in terms of sleep-related breathing disturbances alone. (...) The traditional approach to diagnosis has been the demonstration of the disorder through overnight sleep studies in a dedicated sleep laboratory (251).
Language:English
Score: 1065035.6 - https://www.who.int/gard/publi...ronic_respiratory_diseases.pdf
Data Source: un
Hi, my name is Professor Frank Oberklaid and this is my Mini Parenting Master Class.” Why do babies sleep so much? “Babies don’t know that the norm is to sleep at night-time and be awake during the day. So they sleep in bursts of three or four hours usually, wake up to have a feed and then go back to sleep. As their brain develops, there are reasons for them not to sleep because there are things to be curious about; they’re engaging with their world, parents are talking to them, reading to them.
Language:English
Score: 1056600.9 - https://www.unicef.org/mongoli...ks-mini-parenting-master-class
Data Source: un
During sleep, process S decreases in an exponential fashion. Process S is therefore directly related to sleep loss and produces the so- called “sleep pressure” that builds up over time awake. (...) These authors considered the impact of three categories of potential sources of fatigue, namely homeostatic factors (e.g., time since sleep), circadian influences (e.g., time of day) and the nature of the task (e.g., duration, workload and monotony) on (i) actual accidents and injuries and (ii) performance decrements that might plausibly result in accidents or injuries.
Language:English
Score: 1053850.4 - https://www.icao.int/safety/fa...athematical_fatigue_models.pdf
Data Source: un