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Impact took several forms – the complete removal of natural vegetation in areas of open cast bituminous sand extraction, forest felling along way-leaves for surveying purposes and the targeting felling of forest associated with exploration and subsurface extraction activities. (...) However, greater attention is now given to landform and hydrology resulting in a more random mixture of planting typical of the natural forest. Opencast oil sand extraction is limited to areas close to the Athabasca River where the sand is relatively close to the surface. (...) Al-Pac has developed considerable expertise in this topic in relation to its logging activities and it is working with the oil industry to try to introduce these practises such that they become part of the normal procedures adopted during oil exploration and extraction activities. A document produced by Terry Oska and Maggie Glasgow of Al-Pac describing wellhead recovery practices may be accessed  here   Poplar and aspen saplings planted on restored open cast coal extraction site neighbouring the Genesee Power Station Oil sand extraction facilities at Fort McMurray Newly restored and mature restoration areas following open cast oil sand extraction activities Mixed planted and natural regeneration of aspen on an oil sand exploration landing site Terry Osko of Al-Pac describing activities to restore mixed aspen and spruce woodland to full productivity at former landings used for oil sand exploration.
Language:English
Score: 1166912.9 - https://www.fao.org/forestry/78957/en/
Data Source: un
The Wittig reaction used in the production of zeaxanthin (synthetic) 3.2. Zeaxanthin-rich extract A Zeaxanthin-rich extract is produced by hexane extraction of the red flowers of Tagetes erecta and subsequently purified by saponification and crystallization. (...) The limits for residual solvents are included in the specifications at levels conforming to the limits in JECFA specifications for extracted carotenoids and other natural extracts. The data submitted by the sponsor showed that three of four investigated batches (with zeaxanthin content about 23 %) met these limits. 7. (...) Layug, D.V.; Ohshima, M.; Ostrowski-Meissner, H.T.; Yokota, H.O. (1995) Effect of antioxidants and storage conditions on the retention of carotenoids in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) leaf extract. J Japan Soc Grassland Sci. 40: 410-419. Osuna-Garcia, J.A.; Wall, M.M.; Waddell, C.A. (1997) Natural antioxidants for preventing color loss in stored paprika.
Language:English
Score: 1166780.7 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ecfa/cta/67/cta_zeaxanthin.pdf
Data Source: un
Extractive Industries Taxation: CRP.3 – ATTACHMENT C Negotiation Extractive Industries Taxation: CRP.3 – ATTACHMENT C Negotiation 1 Guidance Note on the Tax Aspects of Negotiation and Renegotiation of Contracts1 Executive Summary/Purpose The purpose of this note is to provide an overview of some of the tax and fiscal related issues developing countries face in the negotiation and possible renegotiation of long term natural resource contracts. (...) An attempted “override” may simply be unenforceable, and lead to conflicts and ambiguities that only increase risk and uncertainty. http://pages.au.int/sites/default/files/Action%20Plan%20Final%20Version%20Jan%202012%20%282%29.pdf http://resourcegovernance.org/approach/natural-resource-charter/precept-1-strategy-consultation-and-institutions http://resourcegovernance.org/approach/natural-resource-charter/precept-1-strategy-consultation-and-institutions Extractive Industries Taxation: CRP.3 – ATTACHMENT C Negotiation 5 by the region or locations where most of the activities are conducted. (...) In addition, when a country does decide to hire outside support, a robust and transparent process for Extractive Industries Taxation: CRP.3 – ATTACHMENT C Negotiation 12 Many organizations are available to provide overall background to a country beginning or enhancing its education on important natural resource development issues.
Language:English
Score: 1163101.2 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...C_NegotiationRenegotiation.pdf
Data Source: un
Paradoxically, in the rural economy, where most of the world’s natural resources are located, communities generally benefit little from their extraction. (...) It noted that there had been positive experiences with policies and programmes such as the promotion of studies in sciences and engineering, distance learning programmes for the industry, facilitation of dialogue between workers, enterprises and training institutions, training funds and apprenticeship programmes.23 Extractive industries within the context of the rural economy Even though the extraction and export of non-renewable natural resources are an opportunity for economic growth, extraction and export alone do not necessarily engender sustainable development. (...) Policies and technical interventions should (i) promote decent work in the extractive industries, and (ii) be focused on turning the resource curse into a blessing, so that revenues from natural resources can be used to finance education, health and rural development.
Language:English
Score: 1162118.2 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...ts/publication/wcms_437199.pdf
Data Source: un
Land, Natural Resources and Conflict: From Curse to Opportunity. (...) English Français Español The EU-UN Partnership on Land, Natural Resources and Conflict Prevention UN Home Main Page The Partnership EU-UN Partnership UNDG-ECHA Guidance Note Country Focus Afghanistan Cote D'Ivoire Democratic Republic of Congo Great Lakes Peru Zambia Peacebuilding Online Training Additional Resources Natural Resources and Conflict Extractive Value Chain and Conflict Prevention Contact Us Preventing Conflict in Resource-Rich Countries - A Discussion Paper PDF [4.9 MB] This paper is a response to the pressing need to “conflict-sensitize” the World Bank’s Extractive Industries Value Chain in order to gain greater understanding regarding EI conflicts’ underlying issues and dynamics, and practical preventive measures to mitigate these potential conflict risks along the links of the EI value chain. In essence, this paper proposes the adoption of the Extractive Industries Value Chain as a framework for conflict prevention to guide and prioritize conflict-sensitive policy reforms and operations supported by the World Bank, UN and other development partners in resource-rich countries.
Language:English
Score: 1160944.8 - https://www.un.org/en/land-nat...rces/preventing-conflict.shtml
Data Source: un
They are planning, roads, felling, extraction, long-distance transport and post-harvest assessment. (...) Felling is done using axes, saws, chainsaws, feller bunchers or harvesters. Extraction by means of dragging stems or logs on the ground is called skidding. (...) Harvesting systems are classified as, full tree systems, where trees are extracted to landing or plant with the full crown, tree length systems, where tops and branches have been removed prior to extraction, and short wood systems, where topping, debranching and cross cutting are done close to the stump.
Language:English
Score: 1160234.3 - https://www.fao.org/sustainabl...harvesting/basic-knowledge/en/
Data Source: un
Land, Natural Resources and Conflict: From Curse to Opportunity. (...) English Français Español The EU-UN Partnership on Land, Natural Resources and Conflict Prevention UN Home Main Page The Partnership EU-UN Partnership UNDG-ECHA Guidance Note Country Focus Afghanistan Cote D'Ivoire Democratic Republic of Congo Great Lakes Peru Zambia Peacebuilding Online Training Additional Resources Natural Resources and Conflict Extractive Value Chain and Conflict Prevention Contact Us EU-UN Partnership The management of natural resources is one of the most critical challenges facing developing countries today. (...) The subject matter of the Guidance Notes cover: (i) land and conflict , (ii) extractive industries , (iii) renewable resources and conflict , (iv) strengthening capacities for natural resource management , (v) conflict prevention in resource rich economies , (vi) capacity inventory for natural resource management Based on the Guidance Notes, the second outcome of the project is to deliver a series of trainings and workshops modules for UN and EU country staff, as well as local partners, to enhance the knowledge and skills needed to understand, anticipate, prevent and mitigate potential conflicts over land and natural resources.
Language:English
Score: 1156584.2 - https://www.un.org/en/land-nat.../eu-un-partnership-offer.shtml
Data Source: un
Capital Gains, Permanent Establishments Approach and Structure • Background • Overview of Business Cycle • Special focus – Personal Scope – Substantive Scope – Selected Articles addressed • Emphasis of Extractive Industry Issues • Emphasis of differences between UN MTC and OECD MTC • Examples of Real Life Treaties Lifecycle of Extractive Industry Project Contract Negotiation Exploration Activities & Evaluation Development of the Infrastructure Extraction, Production, Export Abandonment and Decommissioning Stages, Activities, Actors, Issues Stages Key Activities Actors Domestic Tax Issues International Tax Issues Contract Negotiation and Signature Extractive company may get engaged in competitive bidding or contract negotiation with assistance of advisers and lawyers Extractive Company, Consortium members, Advisers, Lawyers, Financiers Obligatory (tax) payments, such as Signature Bonus, Payments to advisers and WHT consideration Are Signature Bonus payments covered by scope of DTT? (...) Development of the Infrastructure Development of extractive (mining pits, extraction wells) and supportive infrastructure including transportation (roads, railway, pipelines) and accommodation and office units Extractive Company, Subcontractors – Construction, Installation and Drilling Companies Obligatory (tax) payments, such as development Bonus (unusual) Payments to subcontractors and the relevant tax considerations (WHT) Are development bonus payments covered by scope of DTT? (...) Stages Key Activities Actors Domestic Tax Issues International Tax Issues Extraction, Production, Export Extractive activities take place on commercial scale, Resource is processed and/or Transported/ Exported Extraction Company Subcontractors – processing, transportation, other services Extraction Taxes (Royalties, Share from PSA, Hydrocarbon Taxes, Corporate Income Tax, Hydrocarbon tax), Export Related taxes (Excise, Export Customs Duty, Export Rent Taxes and other) Payments to subcontractors and the relevant tax considerations (WHT) Are extraction type of taxes covered by scope of DTT?
Language:English
Score: 1156553.5 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...s/2015/11/11STM_PPT_BalcoA.pdf
Data Source: un
Extraction industries Extraction industries For reasons linked to the geography of France, the situation of the raw materials sector seems highly contrasted depending on whether we talk about metallic substances (iron, nickel, bauxite, etc.), industrial minerals (barite, fluorine, kaolin, silicon, talc, limestone, gypsum, etc.) or construction materials (granulates, hard rock, etc.). (...) National judicial frameworks The extractive mining activity is controlled by the mining code and the environment code. (...) The mining code defines mine materials whose public usefulness justifies the possibility of access to the land resource required for extraction. The notion of mine is based on the nature of the materials, whether extraction is opencast or underground.
Language:English
Score: 1156322.3 - https://www.un.org/esa/dsd/dsd...ionalReports/france/Mining.pdf
Data Source: un
“Many countries have mismanaged the income from their natural resources, have poorly negotiated with extractive companies, or have made misguided spending choices” said Pauline Rose, director of the Education for All Global Monitoring Report. (...) All countries rich in natural resources should publish annual budget data (including resource revenues, the Enacted Budget, actual spending, and an Audit Report) as well as sign up to Extractives Industry Transparency initiative and other transparency and fair taxation measures. 3. (...) Cambodia, Côte d’Ivoire, Madagascar and Mali are also set to increase extraction of natural resources in coming years, but the potential quantity of exports is not yet known.
Language:English
Score: 1155142.2 - https://en.unesco.org/gem-repo...ault/files/PR_resources_en.pdf
Data Source: un