Home

Results 1 - 10 of 150,613 for newborn girl. Search took 10.109 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
India has shown significant progress in the reduction of child mortality and the focus now needs to be on newborns and reaching the most marginalized children, with special focus on the girl child. (...) Statistics reflect community attitudes with fewer hospital admissions for girls than boys, showing that parents sometimes give less attention to girl newborns. In 2017 alone 150,000 fewer girls were admitted to SNCUs than boys.  Most newborns die from things that we know how to prevent or treat: complications due to prematurity or during labour and birth, and infections like sepsis, pneumonia, tetanus and diarrhoea.                 
Language:English
Score: 1511503.7 - https://www.unicef.org/india/what-we-do/health
Data Source: un
India has made progress in the reduction of newborn mortality with it’s share of the global newborn mortality burden coming down from one third of newborn deaths in 1990 to below a quarter of total newborn deaths today. (...) Despite the availability of free service, less than half (41 per cent) of admissions to the SNCUs are of girls. In 2019, 190,000 fewer new-born girls were admitted to over 849 SNCUs across India. Though evidence reveals new-born girls as biologically stronger, they remain socially vulnerable due to widespread male child preference, reflected in the higher infant and under five mortality of girl children. 
Language:English
Score: 1476234.3 - https://www.unicef.org/india/w...we-do/newborn-and-child-health
Data Source: un
Figure 6.1: Timeline of key events for adolescent health, 2005–2013 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2013 UN’s World Youth Report 2005: Young people today, and in 2015 World Development Report 2007: Development and the Next Generation (World Bank) Centre for Global Development publishes Start with a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health UNICEF report, Progress for Children: A report card on adolescents Women Deliver conference included youth working group and 100 young leaders were invited to attend International Conference on Population and Development Global Youth Forum First Youth Supplement to UNFPA’s State of World Population Report Essential Interventions, Commodities and Guidelines for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (WHO) WHO announces it is developing a report “Health for the world’s adolescents” 2012 Lancet Series on Adolescent Health Launch of Girls Not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage Launch of UN H4+ initiative First detailed analysis of mortality among adolescents (Patton et al., Lancet) Launch of the Global Strategy and the Commission on Information and Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health WHO Guidelines on Preventing Early Pregnancy and Poor Reproductive Outcomes Among Adolescents in Developing Countries Lancet Series on Family Planning UN Commission on the Status of Women focuses on violence against girls 53Analysing Progress on Commitments to the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health The Global Strategy, which identifies adolescents as a vulnerable group and an area where action is needed,91 appears to have catalysed a range of initiatives on adolescent health. (...) The goal is to vaccinate 30 million girls in over 40 countries by 2020. Together for Girls, an NGO, committed to eliminate sexual violence against children, particularly girls. (...) The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) is the world’s largest voluntary movement dedicated to girls and young women, with more than 10 million members in 145 countries.
Language:English
Score: 1467688.2 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/know...tions/pmnch_report13_5_6_7.pdf
Data Source: un
Basic education provides girls and women with an understanding of basic health, nutrition and family planning thereby empowering girls and women to decide over their own lives and bodies. (...) Educated and healthier girls and women are important for sustainable social and economic development. (...) Proposed women’s and children’s health related goals and indicators Goal Indicator Eliminating preventable deaths and morbidity amongst women and children • Maternal Mortality Rate • Under 5 Mortality Rate, • Stunting of under 5 children • Indicators of morbidity Affordable access to health care and protection against catastrophic health events • Universal Health Coverage • Access to key reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent interventions o Met need for contraception o Antenatal care coverage o Antiretroviral prophylaxis among HIV-positive pregnant women, and antiretroviral therapy for women who are treatment-eligible; o Skilled attendant at birth o Postnatal care for mothers and babies o Exclusive breastfeeding for six months o Three doses of the combined diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus vaccine o Antibiotic treatment for pneumonia • Access to additional reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent interventions o Select, based on country mortality and morbidity factors, from e.g.39 indicators used by Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival, or PMNCH 56 essential interventions Accountability Based on Commission on Information and Accountability targets, introduce metric to measure progress on civil registration and vital statistics to record neonatal, infant and maternal mortality Girls’ Education Proportion of girls graduating from secondary education Women and children’s health remains as an essential component for consideration within the thematic consultation on Education. i Barbara Herz, and Gene B.
Language:English
Score: 1446584.2 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...ws/2013/exec_sum_education.pdf
Data Source: un
Recalling the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo; the 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing, and the Delhi Declaration on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health of April 2005; Building on the first Countdown to 2015 Conference in London in December 2005, which launched a concerted effort to scale up country action to achieve MDG 4 on reducing child mortality; and acknowledging that progress towards MDG 5 – improving maternal health – is not sufficient in many countries; Concerned that almost 10 million children and newborns die every year from largely preventable diseases and conditions, and more than half a million women die annually from the complications of pregnancy and childbirth; Recognizing that first-time adolescent mothers, particularly poor, marginalized, disadvantaged girls, bear the highest risks of maternal morbidity and mortality; Recognizing the enormous economic and social burden that results from poor reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health and the barrier this constitutes to development and alleviation of poverty; Recognizing the impact of underdevelopment, poverty, HIV/AIDS, gender inequity, and conflict on the health of women and children; Taking note that: Progress in countries in reducing maternal, newborn and child mortality represents a major success for governments, stakeholders, civil society and development partners, and these efforts should continue and be intensified; Greater investments in basic infrastructure and human resources are key to improving health services and stronger programming, guided by local evidence, is needed to reduce deaths of women and newborns around the time of childbirth, taking into account the different delivery strategies needed across the continuum of care; The maternal, newborn and child continuum of care must cover the period from adolescence though pre-pregnancy, pregnancy and childbirth, and from birth until the age of 5 years; Adequate nutrition, and food security, water and sanitation should be a priority at all levels and in particular at the family level, given their strong relationship to overall health, productivity and ultimately to social and economic development; Communities need to be involved, informed and empowered about maternal and child health needs, utilize services, and demand accountability; Reducing maternal, newborn and child deaths on a sustained basis will require a functional and reliable health system that can deliver preventive, promotive curative services through an integrated approach. New and ongoing initiatives must contribute to strengthening health systems while focusing on achieving measurable outcomes; All new initiatives must strengthen collaboration with partners in line with national programmes, and comply with the Paris Declaration; Maternal, newborn and child mortality reduction also requires interventions to keep adolescent girls in school, stop child marriages, promote gender equality, livelihood skills, positive health-seeking behaviours, and address the unmet need for contraception, To achieve the health-related MDGs requires a strong focus on Africa south of the Sahara, South Asia, and other countries with high mortality in other regions; Policy, programmatic, financing and investment efforts that address inequities are needed now, supported by strong monitoring for continuous improvement. (...) Commit ourselves to an intensive effort to: Sustain and expand successful efforts to achieve high and equitable coverage of effective and high-impact interventions that save lives and improve the health of mothers and children, and thereby contribute to the fight against poverty; Integrate efforts to address undernutrition with broader maternal and child health strategies; Support initiatives to stop early marriage, early childbirth and harmful practices, to keep adolescent girls in schools and to promote good health-seeking behaviour among them; Strengthen primary health care, linked to the achievement of measurable results; Invest in strengthening health systems, including efforts to improve the quality, accessibility, affordability and coverage of essential health services, with a particular focus on priority periods within the continuum of care and strengthening links with interventions addressing HIV/AIDS; Invest in infrastructure development and human resources in relation to ethical recruitment and training of health workers, particularly skilled attendants, at all levels, assuring a committed and motivated health workforce; Allocate more resources to research, monitoring and evaluation for maternal, reproductive, newborn and child health, and strengthening use of data to guide implementation; Address inequities in coverage of care among different geographic, socioeconomic, age and gender groups; Hold governments, financing institutions and international organizations accountable for making adequate resources available to achieve MDGs 4 and 5, and other health-related MDGs; Ensure predictable, long-term financing for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health which reflects countries' priorities and plans.
Language:English
Score: 1446456.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...tatement_commitment_to_act/en/
Data Source: un
Participants in the Countdown conference agreed to hold their next gathering in 2010, vowing to accelerate country action, monitoring of donor investments in maternal, newborn and child health and data gathering. In the statement issued today, the Ministers, Parliamentarians and conference participants committed themselves to an intensive effort to: • Sustain and expand successful efforts to achieve high and equitable coverage of effective and high-impact interventions that save lives and improve the health of mothers and children, and thereby contribute to the fight against poverty; • Integrate efforts to address undernutrition with broader maternal and child health strategies; • Support initiatives to stop early marriage, early childbirth and other harmful practices, to keep adolescent girls in schools and to promote good health-seeking behaviour among them; • Strengthen primary health care, linked to the achievement of measurable results; • Invest in strengthening health systems, including efforts to improve the quality, accessibility, affordability and coverage of essential health services, with a particular focus on priority periods within the continuum of care and strengthening links with interventions addressing HIV/AIDS; • Invest in infrastructure development and human resources in relation to ethical recruitment and training of health workers, particularly skilled attendants, at all levels, assuring a committed and motivated health workforce; • Allocate more resources to research, monitoring and evaluation for maternal, reproductive, newborn and child health, and strengthening use of data to guide implementation; • Address inequities in coverage of care among different geographic, socioeconomic, age and gender groups; • Hold governments, financing institutions and international organizations accountable for making adequate resources available to achieve MDGs 4 and 5, and other health-related MDGs; • Ensure predictable, long-term financing for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health which reflects countries' priorities and plans. (...) For more information: In Cape Town/Geneva Tunga Namiljilsuren Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Hosted by WHO Mobile: +41 79 477 2678 Email: namjilsurent@who.int In London: Cathy Bartley Bartley Robbs Consultants Mobile: +44 208 694 9138 Email: cathy.bartley-robbs.co.uk Statement of Commitment Concerning Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival by Participants in the Countdown to 2015 conference Cape Town, April 17-19, 2008 We, the Ministers, parliamentarians and all participants at the Countdown to 2015 Conference in Cape Town, South Africa, April 17 - 19, 2008 Recalling the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo; the 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing, and the Delhi Declaration on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health of April 2005; Building on the first Countdown to 2015 Conference in London in December 2005, which launched a concerted effort to scale up country action to achieve MDG 4 on reducing child mortality; and acknowledging that progress towards MDG 5 – improving maternal health – is not sufficient in many countries; Concerned that almost 10 million children and newborns die every year from largely preventable diseases and conditions, and more than half a million women die annually from the complications of pregnancy and childbirth; Recognizing that first-time adolescent mothers, particularly poor, marginalized, disadvantaged girls, bear the highest risks of maternal morbidity and mortality; Recognizing the enormous economic and social burden that results from poor reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health and the barrier this constitutes to development and alleviation of poverty; Recognizing the impact of underdevelopment, poverty, HIV/AIDS, gender inequity, and conflict on the health of women and children; Taking note that: Progress in countries in reducing maternal, newborn and child mortality represents a major success for governments, stakeholders, civil society and development partners, and these efforts should continue and be intensified; Greater investments in basic infrastructure and human resources are key to improving health services and stronger programming, guided by local evidence, is needed to reduce deaths of women and newborns around the time of childbirth, taking into account the different delivery strategies needed across the continuum of care; The maternal, newborn and child continuum of care must cover the period from adolescence though pre-pregnancy, pregnancy and childbirth, and from birth until the age of 5 years; Adequate nutrition, and food security, water and sanitation should be a priority at all levels and in particular at the family level, given their strong relationship to overall health, productivity and ultimately to social and economic development; Communities need to be involved, informed and empowered about maternal and child health needs, utilize services, and demand accountability; Reducing maternal, newborn and child deaths on a sustained basis will require a functional and reliable health system that can deliver preventive, promotive curative services through an integrated approach. New and ongoing initiatives must contribute to strengthening health systems while focusing on achieving measurable outcomes; All new initiatives must strengthen collaboration with partners in line with national programmes, and comply with the Paris Declaration; Maternal, newborn and child mortality reduction also requires interventions to keep adolescent girls in school, stop child marriages, promote gender equality, livelihood skills, positive health- seeking behaviours, and address the unmet need for contraception, To achieve the health-related MDGs requires a strong focus on Africa south of the Sahara, South Asia, and other countries with high mortality in other regions; Policy, programmatic, financing and investment efforts that address inequities are needed now, supported by strong monitoring for continuous improvement.
Language:English
Score: 1446439.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...ents/2008/cd_press_release.pdf
Data Source: un
For example: the girl Child and reProduCtive, Maternal, newBorn and Child health Acknowledgements: This is an African Union Commission policy brief produced as part of a series in support of the International Conference on Maternal, Newborn & Child Health 2013. The following partners (listed in alphabetical order) have contributed to the development of this policy brief series; Countdown to 2015, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Evidence 4 Action, Family Care International, Global Health Insights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, University College London Institute for Global Health, UNFPA, UNICEF, USAID, White Ribbon Alliance, WHO; through the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health. BaCkground A focus on the health of the girl child is essential for reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health efforts.a Girls under the age of 15 are five times more likely than older women to die in childbirth. (...) Girls are also more likely to leave school aFriCan union union aFriCaine uniÃo aFriCana PoliCy BrieF Draft Policy Brief for the International Conference on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH) in Africa.
Language:English
Score: 1445752.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...au_policy_brief_girl_child.pdf
Data Source: un
Learn more International Day of the Girl Child 11 OCTOBER 2015 | GLOBALThe International Day of the Girl Child was established by the UN General Assembly in 2011 to promote the rights of girls and the unique challenges they face as well as supports action to create more opportunity for girls and increase awareness of the inequality they face worldwide based on their gender. (...) Learn more Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference 18-21 OCTOBER 2015 | MEXICO CITYThe Secretariat of Health of Mexico and 15 other partners will gather in Mexico City on 18-21 October 2015 for a landmark technical conference to discuss strategies for reaching every mother and newborn with high-quality health care.The Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference meeting will focus on accelerating progress towards effective and sustainable coverage of maternal and newborn interventions at scale. (...) Learn more 11th Annual Global health Forum 29 OCTOBER 2015 | MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA Moving the Goalposts: what difference will the Sustainable Development Goals make to Maternal and Newborn Health? Both risks and opportunities are presented by the proposed Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, no more so than for the unfinished agenda for maternal and newborn health.
Language:English
Score: 1440916.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/media/events/2015/en/index9.html
Data Source: un
The vaccine was issued to primary school girls aged 9-13 years as well as out of school girls. (...) A bottleneck analysis of the newborn situation and challenges was done which revealed that we had few indicators of the newborn in HMIS and DHIS2. Indicators have been revised and more newborn indicators have been included. Malawi’s ENAP is led by the Ministry of Health , demonstrating country ownership , and has the following guiding principles: - Integration of newborn services into other maternal health and child health activities; - ensuring every newborn is counted, equity and equality to reach out to every newborn, child and woman; and - accountability and transparency for optimal use of resources.
Language:English
Score: 1440109.8 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/malawi.pdf
Data Source: un
Strengthening the linkage between HIV/AIDS and reproductive health is also crucial in delivering care for women and girls. Women’s empowerment is vital for achieving progress in maternal health, both newborn and child, in contributing to ending violence against women and in social and economic development. 3 Health outcomes for women and girls and the MDGs Improving health outcomes for women and girls demands accelerated action across MDGs 3, 4, 5 and 6. (...) In this context, it is clear that resources for maternal, newborn and child health must increase dramatically. (...) Twelve out of 15 million children orphaned by AIDS live in sub-Saharan Africa, with girls more likely than boys to drop out from school and at a higher risk of being subjected to violence and abuse. 4 The establishment of The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) has galvanized a multi-stakeholder and action-oriented approach to scaling up interventions for the achievement of MDGs 4 and 5, while raising awareness of the inextricable linkages with MDGs 3 and 6 for women and girls, as well as that of MDG 1 in eradicating poverty and hunger.
Language:English
Score: 1435176.4 - https://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/p...0for%20women%20and%20girls.pdf
Data Source: un