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India has made progress in the reduction of newborn mortality with it’s share of the global newborn mortality burden coming down from one third of newborn deaths in 1990 to below a quarter of total newborn deaths today. (...) Despite the availability of free service, less than half (41 per cent) of admissions to the SNCUs are of girls. In 2019, 190,000 fewer new-born girls were admitted to over 849 SNCUs across India. Though evidence reveals new-born girls as biologically stronger, they remain socially vulnerable due to widespread male child preference, reflected in the higher infant and under five mortality of girl children. 
Language:English
Score: 1264952 - https://www.unicef.org/india/w...we-do/newborn-and-child-health
Data Source: un
MONITORING OF POPULATION PROGRAMMES, FOCUSING ON FERTILITY, REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT :REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL
Rates have declined in urban areas in sub- Saharan Africa, but may be on the rise among the poorest, least educated girls.11 Almost 15 million adolescent girls become mothers every year. (...) Girls are provided access to family planning and receive sexuality education and counselling. (...) It has initiated girl-targeted activities in Ethiopia, Guatemala, Liberia and Malawi.
Language:English
Score: 1264134.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=E/CN.9/2011/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Figure 6.1: Timeline of key events for adolescent health, 2005–2013 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2013 UN’s World Youth Report 2005: Young people today, and in 2015 World Development Report 2007: Development and the Next Generation (World Bank) Centre for Global Development publishes Start with a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health UNICEF report, Progress for Children: A report card on adolescents Women Deliver conference included youth working group and 100 young leaders were invited to attend International Conference on Population and Development Global Youth Forum First Youth Supplement to UNFPA’s State of World Population Report Essential Interventions, Commodities and Guidelines for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (WHO) WHO announces it is developing a report “Health for the world’s adolescents” 2012 Lancet Series on Adolescent Health Launch of Girls Not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage Launch of UN H4+ initiative First detailed analysis of mortality among adolescents (Patton et al., Lancet) Launch of the Global Strategy and the Commission on Information and Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health WHO Guidelines on Preventing Early Pregnancy and Poor Reproductive Outcomes Among Adolescents in Developing Countries Lancet Series on Family Planning UN Commission on the Status of Women focuses on violence against girls 53Analysing Progress on Commitments to the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health The Global Strategy, which identifies adolescents as a vulnerable group and an area where action is needed,91 appears to have catalysed a range of initiatives on adolescent health. (...) The goal is to vaccinate 30 million girls in over 40 countries by 2020. Together for Girls, an NGO, committed to eliminate sexual violence against children, particularly girls. (...) The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) is the world’s largest voluntary movement dedicated to girls and young women, with more than 10 million members in 145 countries.
Language:English
Score: 1263679.9 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/know...tions/pmnch_report13_5_6_7.pdf
Data Source: un
SUPPORTING EFFORTS TO END OBSTETRIC FISTULA : RESOLUTION / ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
A/RES/65/188 2 Taking note with appreciation of the report of the Secretary-General on supporting efforts to end obstetric fistula, 8F 9 and welcoming the conclusions and recommendations contained therein, Stressing the interlinkages between poverty, malnutrition, lack of or inadequate or inaccessible health services, early childbearing, early marriage of the girl child, violence against young women and girls and gender discrimination as root causes of obstetric fistula, and that poverty remains the main social risk factor, Recognizing that the difficult socio-economic conditions that exist in many developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, have resulted in the acceleration of the feminization of poverty, Recognizing also that early pregnancy and early childbearing entail complications during pregnancy and delivery and a much higher risk of maternal mortality and morbidity, and deeply concerned that early childbearing and limited access to the highest attainable standard of health, including sexual and reproductive health, including in the area of emergency obstetric care, cause high levels of obstetric fistula and other maternal morbidities, as well as maternal mortality, Recognizing further the serious immediate and long-term implications for health, including sexual and reproductive health, as well as increased vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, and the negative impact on psychological, social and economic development that violence against the girl child and adolescent girls represents for individuals, families, communities and States, Deeply concerned about discrimination against the girl child and the violation of the rights of the girl child, which often result in less access by girls to education and nutrition, reduced physical and mental health and enjoyment by girls of fewer of the rights, opportunities and benefits of childhood and adolescence compared with boys, and in their often being subjected to various forms of cultural, social, sexual and economic exploitation and to violence and harmful practices, Welcoming the contribution by Member States, the international community and civil society to the global Campaign to End Fistula, bearing in mind that a people-centred approach to social and economic development is fundamental for protecting and empowering individuals and communities, Welcoming also the outcome document of the High-level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on the Millennium Development Goals, entitled “Keeping the promise: united to achieve the Millennium Development Goals”, 9F10 in particular the references to Goal 5, Welcoming further the Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, undertaken by a broad coalition of partners, in support of national plans and strategies aimed at significantly reducing the number of maternal, newborn and under-five child deaths as a matter of immediate concern by scaling up a priority package of high-impact interventions and integrating efforts in sectors such as health, education, gender equality, water and sanitation, poverty reduction and nutrition, Welcoming the various national, regional and international initiatives on all the Millennium Development Goals, including those undertaken bilaterally and through _______________ 9 A/65/268. 10 See resolution 65/1. (...) Stresses the need to address the social issues that contribute to the problem of obstetric fistula, such as early marriage of the girl child, early pregnancy, lack of access to sexual and reproductive health, lack of or inadequate education of women and girls, poverty and the low status of women and girls; 3. (...) Calls upon States and/or the relevant funds and programmes, organs and specialized agencies of the United Nations system, within their respective mandates, and invites the international financial institutions and all relevant actors of civil society, including non-governmental organizations, and the private sector: (a) To redouble their efforts to meet the internationally agreed goal of improving maternal health by making maternal health services and obstetric fistula treatment geographically and financially accessible, including by increasing access to skilled attendance at birth, emergency obstetric care and appropriate prenatal and post-natal care; (b) To develop, implement and support national and international prevention, care and treatment and socio-economic reintegration and support strategies, as appropriate, to address effectively the condition of obstetric fistula and to develop further a multisectoral, multidisciplinary, comprehensive and integrated approach in order to bring about lasting solutions and put an end to obstetric fistula, maternal mortality and related morbidities, including through ensuring access to affordable, comprehensive, quality maternal health-care services, including skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care; (c) To strengthen the capacity of health systems, in particular public health systems, to provide the essential services needed to prevent obstetric fistula and to treat those cases that do occur by providing the continuum of services, including family planning, prenatal care, skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and post-partum care, to young women and girls, including those living in poverty and in underserved rural areas where obstetric fistula is most common; (d) To strengthen research, monitoring and evaluation systems, including community-based notification of obstetric fistula cases and maternal and newborn deaths, to guide the implementation of maternal health programmes; (e) To provide essential health services, equipment and supplies and skills training and income-generating projects to women and girls so that they can break out of the cycle of poverty; A/RES/65/188 5 (f) To mobilize funding to provide free or subsidized fistula repairs, including through encouraging more networking among providers and the sharing of new treatment techniques and protocols; (g) To improve data collection, pre- and post-surgery, to measure progress in addressing the needs for surgical treatment and the quality of surgery, rehabilitation and socio-economic reintegration services, including post-surgery prospects for successful subsequent pregnancies, live births and severe health-related complications so as to address the challenges for improving maternal health; (h) To provide health education, rehabilitation and socio-economic reintegration counselling, including medical counselling, as key components of post-operative care to all women after fistula treatment, including to those with irreparable cases; (i) To bring obstetric fistula to the attention of policymakers and communities, thereby reducing the stigma and discrimination associated with it and helping women and girls suffering from obstetric fistula so that they can overcome abandonment and social exclusion together with the psychosocial implications thereof, inter alia, through the support of social reintegration projects; (j) To educate individual women and men, girls and boys, communities, policymakers and health professionals about how obstetric fistula can be prevented and treated, and increase awareness of the needs of pregnant women and girls, as well as of those who have undergone surgical fistula repair, including their right to the highest attainable standard of health, by working with community and religious leaders, traditional birth attendants, women and girls who have suffered from fistula, the media, radio stations, influential public figures and policymakers, support the training of doctors, midwives, nurses and other health workers in lifesaving obstetric care, and include training on fistula repair, treatment and care as a standard element of the training curricula of health professionals; (k) To develop means of transportation and financing that enable women and girls to access obstetric care and treatment, and provide incentives and other means to secure the presence in rural areas of qualified health professionals who are able to perform interventions to prevent obstetric fistula; 10.
Language:English
Score: 1263523.4 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...et?open&DS=A/RES/65/188&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
SUPPORTING EFFORTS TO END OBSTETRIC FISTULA : REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Child marriage affects one in three girls in the developing world, predominantly the poorest, least educated girls living in rural areas. (...) Many women and girls continue to suffer isolation for want of treatment. (...) Countries should ensure free or subsidized maternal health care for all poor women and girls who cannot afford it. 41. To intensify support to countries with some of the highest numbers of maternal and newborn deaths, in line with the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, the “H4+” health agencies (UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, UN-Women, World Bank, WHO) launched the High Burden Country Initiative.
Language:English
Score: 1259927.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...sf/get?open&DS=A/67/258&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
SUPPORTING EFFORTS TO END OBSTETRIC FISTULA :REVISED DRAFT RESOLUTION / ALBANIA, ANDORRA, ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA, ARGENTINA, ARMENIA, AUSTRALIA, AUSTRIA, AZERBAIJAN, BAHAMAS, BANGLADESH, BARBADOS, BELGIUM, BOLIVIA (PLURINATIONAL STATE OF), BRAZIL, BULGARIA, CANADA, CHILE, CHINA, COLOMBIA, COSTA RICA, CROATIA, CUBA, CYPRUS, CZECH REPUBLIC, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF KOREA, DENMARK, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, ECUADOR, EL SALVADOR, ESTONIA, FINLAND, FRANCE, GEORGIA, GERMANY, GREECE, GRENADA, GUATEMALA, GUYANA, HAITI, HONDURAS, HUNGARY, ICELAND, INDIA, INDONESIA, IRELAND, ISRAEL, ITALY, JAMAICA, JAPAN, JORDAN, KAZAKHSTAN, KYRGYZSTAN, LATVIA, LEBANON, LIECHTENSTEIN, LITHUANIA, LUXEMBOURG, MALAWI [ON BEHALF OF THE GROUP OF AFRICAN STATES], MALAYSIA, MALTA, MEXICO, MICRONESIA (FEDERATED STATES OF), MONACO, MONGOLIA, MONTENEGRO, MYANMAR, NETHERLANDS, NEW ZEALAND, NICARAGUA, NORWAY, PAKISTAN, PERU, POLAND, PORTUGAL, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA, ROMANIA, SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS, SAN MARINO, SAUDI ARABIA, SERBIA, SINGAPORE, SLOVAKIA, SLOVENIA, SPAIN, SURINAME, SWEDEN, SWITZERLAND, TAJIKISTAN, THAILAND, THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA, TIMOR-LESTE, TURKEY, UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, URUGUAY, UZBEKISTAN, VENEZUELA (BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF) AND VIET NAM
Stresses the need to address the social issues that contribute to the problem of obstetric fistula, such as early marriage of the girl child, early pregnancy, lack of access to sexual and reproductive health, lack of or inadequate education of women and girls, poverty and the low status of women and girls; 3. Also stresses that States have the obligation to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and girls, that they must exercise __________________ 10 See resolution 65/1. (...) Further calls upon States and/or the relevant funds and programmes, organs and specialized agencies of the United Nations system, within their respective mandates, and invites the international financial institutions and all relevant actors of civil society, including non-governmental organizations, and the private sector: A/C.3/65/L.18/Rev.1 5 10-61776 (a) To redouble their efforts to meet the internationally agreed goal of improving maternal health by making maternal health services and obstetric fistula treatment geographically and financially accessible, including by increasing access to skilled attendance at birth, emergency obstetric care and appropriate prenatal and post-natal care; (b) To develop, implement and support national and international prevention, care and treatment and socio-economic reintegration and support strategies, as appropriate, to address effectively the condition of obstetric fistula and to develop further a multisectoral, multidisciplinary, comprehensive and integrated approach in order to bring about lasting solutions and put an end to obstetric fistula, maternal mortality and related morbidities, including through ensuring access to affordable, comprehensive, quality maternal health-care services, including skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care; (c) To strengthen the capacity of health systems, in particular public health systems, to provide the essential services needed to prevent obstetric fistula and to treat those cases that do occur by providing the continuum of services, including family planning, prenatal care, skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and post-partum care, to young women and girls, including those living in poverty and in underserved rural areas where obstetric fistula is most common; (d) To strengthen research, monitoring and evaluation systems, including community-based notification of obstetric fistula cases and maternal and newborn deaths, to guide the implementation of maternal health programmes; (e) To provide essential health services, equipment and supplies and skills training and income-generating projects to women and girls so that they can break out of the cycle of poverty; (f) To mobilize funding to provide free or subsidized fistula repairs, including through encouraging more networking among providers and the sharing of new treatment techniques and protocols; (g) To improve data collection, pre- and post-surgery, to measure progress in addressing the needs for surgical treatment and the quality of surgery, rehabilitation and socio-economic reintegration services, including post-surgery prospects for successful subsequent pregnancies, live birth and severe health-related complications so as to address the challenges for improving maternal health; (h) To provide health education, rehabilitation and reintegration counselling, including medical counselling, as key components of post-operative care to all women after fistula treatment, including to those with irreparable cases; (i) To bring obstetric fistula to the attention of policymakers and communities, thereby reducing the stigma and discrimination associated with it and helping women and girls suffering from obstetric fistula so that they can overcome abandonment and social exclusion together with the psychosocial implications thereof through, inter alia, the support of social reintegration projects; (j) To educate individual women and men, girls and boys, communities, policymakers and health professionals about how obstetric fistula can be prevented and treated, and increase awareness of the needs of pregnant women and girls, as well as those who have undergone surgical fistula repair, including their right to the highest attainable standard of health, by working with community and religious A/C.3/65/L.18/Rev.1 10-61776 6 leaders, traditional birth attendants, women and girls who have suffered from fistula, the media, radio stations, influential public figures and policymakers, support the training of doctors, midwives, nurses and other health workers in lifesaving obstetric care, and include training on fistula repair, treatment and care as a standard element of the training curricula of health professionals; (k) To develop means of transportation and financing that enable women and girls to access obstetric care and treatment, and provide incentives and other means to secure the presence in rural areas of qualified health professionals who are able to perform interventions to prevent obstetric fistula; 10.
Language:English
Score: 1259320.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...&DS=A/C.3/65/L.18/REV.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
MONITORING OF POPULATION PROGRAMMES, FOCUSING ON HEALTH, MORBIDITY, MORTALITY AND DEVELOPMENT : REPORT OF THE SECRETRAY-GENERAL
Providing women with both family planning and maternal and newborn health services would result in a decline in maternal deaths by an estimated 70 per cent compared to a decline of 57 per cent if developing countries invested in maternal and newborn health care alone. (...) E/CN.9/2010/4 10-21836 8 World Bank — contributes to a global effort to accelerate progress in maternal and newborn survival, issuing a Joint Statement on Maternal and Newborn Health in 2008, followed by the development of a Joint Country Support Plan for Accelerated Implementation of Maternal and Newborn Continuum of Care. (...) It is estimated that approximately 3 million girls and women in Africa are subject to it each year.10 33.
Language:English
Score: 1257695.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...t?open&DS=E/CN.9/2010/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND : DRAFT COUNTRY PROGRAMME DOCUMENT FOR LIBERIA
Early marriage, sex work and teenage pregnancy are common among girls. Approximately 58 per cent of adolescent girls with no education are mothers, compared to 17 per cent of those with secondary and higher education. 4. (...) However, the prevalence rate among pregnant women is higher (4 per cent). Adolescent girls are three times more at risk of contracting HIV than boys. 9. (...) It incorporates advocacy and communication, partnership, networking and capacity-building, and integrates a rights-based and gender-responsive approach. Maternal and newborn health 21. Output 1: Strengthened capacity of health systems to deliver emergency obstetric and newborn care in selected health institutions for women and young people.
Language:English
Score: 1247069.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=DP/FPA/DCP/LBR/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
ELIMINATING MATERNAL MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY THROUGH THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN : DRAFT RESOLUTION / UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
E/CN.6/2012/L.5 12-25399 4 women and girls, harmful traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation/cutting and early and forced marriage, as well as gender-based violence, lack of participation in decision-making, poor health infrastructure, inadequate training for health personnel and inadequate investment in education, nutrition and basic health care, Recognizing also that most instances of maternal mortality and morbidity are preventable and that preventable maternal mortality and morbidity is a health, development and human rights challenge that also requires the effective promotion and protection of the human rights of women and girls, in particular their rights to life, to be equal in dignity, to education, to be free to seek, receive and impart information, to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress, to freedom from discrimination and to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, including sexual and reproductive health, Noting that a human rights-based approach to eliminating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity is underpinned by the principles of, inter alia, accountability, participation, transparency, empowerment, sustainability, non-discrimination and international cooperation, Expressing concern that more than 215 million women who want to avoid pregnancy or control the spacing of their pregnancies are not using an effective method of contraception, despite increases in use in recent years, and noting that meeting the unmet need for family planning with safe, effective and affordable methods of modern contraception would avert nearly 100,000 maternal deaths each year, Deeply concerned that early marriage leads to early pregnancy and early childbearing, which presents a much higher risk of complications during pregnancy and delivery leading to maternal mortality and morbidity, increases the risk of disability, stillbirth and maternal death, exposes young married girls to a greater risk of domestic violence, as well as HIV and sexually transmitted infections, and reduces their opportunities to complete their education, gain comprehensive knowledge, participate in the community or develop employable skills, and recognizing with concern that limited access to the highest attainable standard of health, including sexual and reproductive health, causes high levels of obstetric fistula and other maternal morbidities, as well as maternal mortality, Expressing deep concern that HIV infection significantly increases the risk of maternal mortality and morbidity, so that, in countries with high HIV prevalence, AIDS-related complications are one of the leading causes of maternal mortality, and that nearly half of the pregnant women living with HIV do not have access to critical services, including antiretroviral therapy and, in particular, sexual and reproductive health-care services, including family planning, access to contraception methods and HIV prevention, Noting with concern that maternal and child health is inextricably linked to the risk of non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors, specifically given that prenatal malnutrition and low birth weight create a predisposition to obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes later in life and that conditions such as maternal obesity and gestational diabetes are also associated with an increased risk of contracting non-communicable diseases, E/CN.6/2012/L.5 5 12-25399 Acknowledging that cervical cancer kills around 250,000 women each year, many of childbearing age, and that the vast majority of the deaths and suffering could be averted with highly effective and low-cost screen and treat approaches and through vaccination against the human papilloma virus, Acknowledging also that failure to prevent maternal mortality and morbidity is among the most significant barriers to the empowerment of women and girls in all aspects of life, the full enjoyment of their human rights and their ability to reach their full potential, Recognizing that in armed conflict and post-conflict situations, women’s reproductive health is subject to particular risks and that sexual violence and rape often contribute to exceptionally high levels of maternal morbidity and mortality, Noting that health services are needed to protect and enhance the well-being of both rural and urban populations affected and displaced by crises and conflicts and to reduce and prevent maternal mortality and morbidity, including by providing family planning and caring for those who are victims of violence and other harmful practices, including female genital mutilation/cutting, Emphasizing the role of education and health literacy in improving health outcomes over a lifetime, and expressing concern about the high dropout rate, especially of girls in secondary education, Recognizing the need to ensure women’s and girls’ right to education at all levels, as well as sex education based on full and accurate information in a manner consistent with the evolving capacities of girls and boys, and with appropriate direction and guidance, Reaffirming its commitment to the equal participation of women and men in public and political life as a key element in women’s and men’s equal participation in eliminating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity as well as in decision- making when defining policies and strategies in that regard, Reaffirming also that gender equality, the empowerment of women and the elimination of preventable maternal mortality and morbidity cannot be achieved without promoting and protecting the right of women to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, including sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights, and reaffirming that expanding access to sexual and reproductive health information and health services is essential for achieving the Beijing Platform for Action, the Cairo Programme of Action and the Millennium Development Goals and is crucial for gender equality, the empowerment of women and the full enjoyment by women of all human rights, Recognizing the need for greater coordination and commitment to improving access to health services for women and children through a primary health-care approach and the provision of proven and well-known evidence-based interventions and to reducing maternal, newborn and child mortality and morbidity, including through a continuum of services, including family planning, prenatal care, skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and post-partum care, including for those living in poverty and in underserved rural areas, Noting the negative health effects of early pregnancy and early childbearing, acknowledging the direct health benefit of school attendance for young girls, in the light of the link between years of school attendance and delay in childbirth, E/CN.6/2012/L.5 12-25399 6 including evidence that each additional year of schooling delays the age at which a girl has her first child by approximately six to ten months and that each year of schooling reduces by 14 per cent the likelihood of a girl under 18 having a child, to 23 per cent, Emphasizing the commitment to provide universal access to reproductive health by 2015 and the need to integrate family-planning, sexual health and health- care services in national strategies and programmes, and to ensure that all women, men and young people have information about, access to and a choice of the widest possible range of family-planning options, including safe, effective, affordable and acceptable modern methods of contraception, Emphasizing also the importance of strengthening affordable and sustainable health systems that deliver equitable health outcomes, including by improving basic infrastructure and human and technical resources, Expressing concern about the slow pace of progress in improving maternal, newborn and child health and the inadequate resources for their health, and noting the continuing inequalities among and within Member States, the lack of appreciation of the impact of maternal, newborn and child health on sustainable socio-economic development and the continuing need to address gender inequalities, Stressing the importance of strengthening health systems to better respond to women’s health needs in terms of access, comprehensiveness and quality, and underlining the need to address women’s health through comprehensive strategies targeting root causes of gender inequality in health care, including unequal and limited access to health-care services, Stressing also that with accelerated progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5, it could become possible to envisage, in the not too distant future, a world where preventable maternal mortality has been eliminated, 1. (...) Urges government authorities and other leaders at the international, regional, national and local levels to generate the political will, increased resources, commitment, international cooperation and technical assistance urgently required to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity and improve maternal and newborn health; 3. Calls upon Member States to fully and effectively implement the Beijing Platform for Action,20 the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development (“Cairo Programme of Action”)2 and the outcomes of their review conferences, including the commitments relating to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights, and the promotion and protection of all human rights in this context, and to maximize their efforts to eliminate preventable maternal mortality and morbidity by strengthening comprehensive health-care services for women and girls, including access to sexual and reproductive health- care services and information as agreed to in the Beijing Platform for Action and the Cairo Programme of Action; __________________ 20 Report of the Fourth World Conference on Women, Beijing, 4-15 September 1995 (United Nations publication, Sales No. (...) Calls upon Member States to ensure the right of women and girls to education of good quality and on an equal basis with men and boys, to ensure that they complete a full course of primary education, and to renew their efforts to improve and expand girls’ and women’s education at all levels, including at the secondary and higher levels, as well as vocational education and technical training, in order to, inter alia, achieve gender equality, the empowerment of women and poverty eradication; 8.
Language:English
Score: 1246201.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...open&DS=E/CN.6/2012/L.5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Participants in the Countdown conference agreed to hold their next gathering in 2010, vowing to accelerate country action, monitoring of donor investments in maternal, newborn and child health and data gathering. In the statement issued today, the Ministers, Parliamentarians and conference participants committed themselves to an intensive effort to: • Sustain and expand successful efforts to achieve high and equitable coverage of effective and high-impact interventions that save lives and improve the health of mothers and children, and thereby contribute to the fight against poverty; • Integrate efforts to address undernutrition with broader maternal and child health strategies; • Support initiatives to stop early marriage, early childbirth and other harmful practices, to keep adolescent girls in schools and to promote good health-seeking behaviour among them; • Strengthen primary health care, linked to the achievement of measurable results; • Invest in strengthening health systems, including efforts to improve the quality, accessibility, affordability and coverage of essential health services, with a particular focus on priority periods within the continuum of care and strengthening links with interventions addressing HIV/AIDS; • Invest in infrastructure development and human resources in relation to ethical recruitment and training of health workers, particularly skilled attendants, at all levels, assuring a committed and motivated health workforce; • Allocate more resources to research, monitoring and evaluation for maternal, reproductive, newborn and child health, and strengthening use of data to guide implementation; • Address inequities in coverage of care among different geographic, socioeconomic, age and gender groups; • Hold governments, financing institutions and international organizations accountable for making adequate resources available to achieve MDGs 4 and 5, and other health-related MDGs; • Ensure predictable, long-term financing for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health which reflects countries' priorities and plans. (...) For more information: In Cape Town/Geneva Tunga Namiljilsuren Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Hosted by WHO Mobile: +41 79 477 2678 Email: namjilsurent@who.int In London: Cathy Bartley Bartley Robbs Consultants Mobile: +44 208 694 9138 Email: cathy.bartley-robbs.co.uk Statement of Commitment Concerning Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival by Participants in the Countdown to 2015 conference Cape Town, April 17-19, 2008 We, the Ministers, parliamentarians and all participants at the Countdown to 2015 Conference in Cape Town, South Africa, April 17 - 19, 2008 Recalling the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo; the 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing, and the Delhi Declaration on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health of April 2005; Building on the first Countdown to 2015 Conference in London in December 2005, which launched a concerted effort to scale up country action to achieve MDG 4 on reducing child mortality; and acknowledging that progress towards MDG 5 – improving maternal health – is not sufficient in many countries; Concerned that almost 10 million children and newborns die every year from largely preventable diseases and conditions, and more than half a million women die annually from the complications of pregnancy and childbirth; Recognizing that first-time adolescent mothers, particularly poor, marginalized, disadvantaged girls, bear the highest risks of maternal morbidity and mortality; Recognizing the enormous economic and social burden that results from poor reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health and the barrier this constitutes to development and alleviation of poverty; Recognizing the impact of underdevelopment, poverty, HIV/AIDS, gender inequity, and conflict on the health of women and children; Taking note that: Progress in countries in reducing maternal, newborn and child mortality represents a major success for governments, stakeholders, civil society and development partners, and these efforts should continue and be intensified; Greater investments in basic infrastructure and human resources are key to improving health services and stronger programming, guided by local evidence, is needed to reduce deaths of women and newborns around the time of childbirth, taking into account the different delivery strategies needed across the continuum of care; The maternal, newborn and child continuum of care must cover the period from adolescence though pre-pregnancy, pregnancy and childbirth, and from birth until the age of 5 years; Adequate nutrition, and food security, water and sanitation should be a priority at all levels and in particular at the family level, given their strong relationship to overall health, productivity and ultimately to social and economic development; Communities need to be involved, informed and empowered about maternal and child health needs, utilize services, and demand accountability; Reducing maternal, newborn and child deaths on a sustained basis will require a functional and reliable health system that can deliver preventive, promotive curative services through an integrated approach. New and ongoing initiatives must contribute to strengthening health systems while focusing on achieving measurable outcomes; All new initiatives must strengthen collaboration with partners in line with national programmes, and comply with the Paris Declaration; Maternal, newborn and child mortality reduction also requires interventions to keep adolescent girls in school, stop child marriages, promote gender equality, livelihood skills, positive health- seeking behaviours, and address the unmet need for contraception, To achieve the health-related MDGs requires a strong focus on Africa south of the Sahara, South Asia, and other countries with high mortality in other regions; Policy, programmatic, financing and investment efforts that address inequities are needed now, supported by strong monitoring for continuous improvement.
Language:English
Score: 1244502.5 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...ents/2008/cd_press_release.pdf
Data Source: un