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1=Yes 2=No R25. WHAT IS THE MOVING STATUS OF (NAME)? 1=In-mover 2=Non-mover 3=Out-mover 4=Out-of-scope R26. (...) 1=Yes 2=No R33. WHAT IS THE MOVING STATUS OF (NAME)? 1=In-mover 2=Non-mover 3=Out-mover 4=Out-of-scope R34. (...) WHAT IS THE MATCHING STATUS OF (NAME)? 1=Match 2=Non-Match Notes a. In-mover: An in-mover is one who moved into the household or house/compound after the Census enumeration date. b.
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Score: 1303261.5 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...doc/LSO_QUE5_ENG_2020_2021.pdf
Data Source: un
Microsoft PowerPoint - 2019 2 SAGE rural-urban South Africa Peltzer - Compatibility Mode Rural-urban health disparities among older adults in South Africa Rural-urban health disparities among older adults in South Africa Karl Peltzer 1,2, Nancy Phaswana- Mafuya1, Supa Pengpid1,3 Karl Peltzer 1,2, Nancy Phaswana- Mafuya1, Supa Pengpid1,3 Expert Group Meeting: Measuring population ageing…Bangkok, 25-26 February 2019 BackgroundBackground • Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become one of the world’s biggest public health problems.1 • Aging is often associated with decline in health status characterized by limited physical functioning, increase in chronic diseases as well as decrease in cognitive functioning.2,3 • Social determinants of non-communicable diseases include socioecomonic factors (e.g., poverty, inequality, rural-urban differences)4 and risky health behavioural repertoire.2-4 BackgroundBackground Rural-urban health disparities persist in terms of sociodemographics, health care access, health status, and prevalence of chronic conditions. (...) Tackling socioeconomic inequalities and non-communicable diseases in low-income and middle-income countries under the Sustainable Development agenda. (...) Rural, urban and migrant differences in non-communicable disease risk-factors in middle income countries: a cross-sectional study of WHO-SAGE data.
Language:English
Score: 1301693.3 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...M_26Feb2019_S5_KarlPeltzer.pdf
Data Source: un
Some examples responding to the above scenarios include pathways such as visa and residence/work permit procedures that: Prior to/upon arrival • Facilitate the regular and safe admission and transit of migrants who face situations of vulnerability in their country of origin, including by providing humanitarian visas, family reunification, private sponsorships, and work permits. • Allow migrants, including those in transit, to travel to the destination State in a regular and safe manner for compassionate, humanitarian or other reasons. 7 Already on the territory • Provide access to regular status when the return of a migrant may be in breach of human rights obligations, including but not limited to the principle of non-refoulement under international human rights law;11 • Provide an extension of temporary stay; • Uphold the right to private and family life and maintain family unity; • Guarantee the best interests of the child; • Offer regularization to address situations of vulnerability, uphold access to rights and ensure the wellbeing and inclusion of migrants in society; • Uphold the rights of survivors of sexual gender-based violence, violence and harassment, human trafficking, forced labour, and abusive recruitment practices; • Provide adjustment from one migration status to another for migrants already on the territory; • Ensure that loss of employment does not automatically result in loss of regular migration status; • Respond to labour market needs. 18. (...) Where it is not lawful, legitimate, necessary and proportionate, differential treatment in relation to access to rights and services based on migration status and the grounds under which residence is granted amounts to discrimination. Moreover, limited access to rights and services can itself be a further cause of vulnerability for the individual. 39. Status transition: When temporary residence is granted to migrants in vulnerable situations, States should provide for avenues to transition to another status, including those that provide long-term residence.
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Score: 1296845.1 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...tions_of_vulnerabilty_2021.pdf
Data Source: un
Undocumented children are a diverse group, that often change between categories or statuses during the course of their childhood. For example, they may have submitted an application for international protection as a family, which was refused, or applied for an official family reunification scheme through a family member with regular status, but not qualified. (...) As a result, children are more at risk of becoming undocumented, as their status is linked to their parents’ and their individual situations are rarely considered in decisions to grant or refuse residence permits or claims for international protection. (...) Access to Services Children’s entitlements to access services are usually linked to their migration or residence status. In this way undocumented children are explicitly discriminated against in the legal framework.
Language:English
Score: 1293866.9 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ration/GA69thSession/PICUM.pdf
Data Source: un
The focus is on non-EU,19 or ‘third-country’, citizens with insecure immigration status residing in England or Sweden, including women on spousal, employment or student visas, asylum seekers, women who have been trafficked, visa ‘over-stayers’ and undocumented women. (...) The term ‘domestic violence’ is used when referring to policy or service provision, or citing scholarship that addresses this broader concept. 19 Due to EU free movement principles, EU citizens residing in England or Sweden do not have ‘insecure status’ in the sense that they are not vulnerable to deportation in the same way as non-EU migrants. (...) “Love is Not a Passport to Sweden” 6 “Human rights law … is still very unevenly applied in Europe… This is especially notable where issues of immigration and security tempt political authorities into sacrificing the rights of unpopular minorities – pre- cisely those groups who are most in need of human rights.”44 She contends that this uneven application leads to a proliferation of rights statuses: “As a result of the uneven application of human rights law combined with existing social and economic inequalities between citizens and non-citizens, [there] is a prolif- eration of statuses regarding citizenship and human rights rather than an equalization of treatment for citizens and non-citizens.”45 From Nash’s perspective, the interplay of human rights and citizenship produces a number of status groups, the members of which “enjoy a different package of formal and substantive rights according to their situa- tion as citizens or non-citizens, the way in which states administer human rights, and their access to material and moral resources within that state”.46 She theorizes that these different status groups would include at least the following five: “super-citizens, marginal citizens, quasi-citizens, sub-citizens and un-citizens”.47 The first two groups consist of ‘full citizens’ of States, quasi-citizens are denizens or long-term residents, sub-citizens are those without independent rights to residence and un-citizens are those with no recognized legal status—for instance, undocumented migrants.
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Score: 1291225.1 - https://www.unwomen.org/sites/...e-against-migrant-women-en.pdf
Data Source: un
The second course would be to draft a special convention to confer a status upon non-refugee stateless persons. The third course would be to drop the question of non-refugee stateless persons until further notice. (...) It may be that some States would not be prepared to grant to non-refugee stateless persons the status which they grant to refugees. (...) CHAPTER III JURIDICAL CONDITION Article 4 Personal status 1. The personal status of refugees (and stateless persons) shall be governed by the law of their country of domicile or, failing such, by the law of their country of residence.
Language:English
Score: 1291127.9 - https://www.unhcr.org/en-ie/pr...status-refugees-stateless.html
Data Source: un
. - The discrepancies between ①the system for temporary migration and the tendency of long- term stay of foreigners, ②the restrictive policy towards low and semi skilled labor and decreasing youth population, ③regional economic integration and non-discriminatory immigration system have become remarkable. - Since November 2002, Japan, Korea, China and ASEAN countries (ASEAN+3) have started the process for establishing free trade agreement or “Economic Partnership Agreement”. (...) C Trends in International Migration in Japan 1 Relationship between temporary and permanent migration - It has long been said that migration policy in Japan as well as East Asia only relates to temporary migration and not permanent migration. - It is true that East Asian countries including Japan are not “immigration countries” in the sense that they do not accept people for the purpose of permanent settlement. - However, those foreigners who are working temporarily are able to apply for permanent resident status. The adjustment of status has become an important means for countries which is attracting skilled or highly skilled workers and their families. - In reality, we are able to verify that when temporary migration increases, the permanent residents also increases in Japan or in several regions in the world. 291,793619,269911,062742,9631,172,0671,915,0302003 285,027526,685811,712657,6051,028,8391,686,4442000 267,746460,522728,268626,040736,3311,362,3711995 246,130374,044620,174645,438429,8791,075,3171990 permanentLong-termTotal PermanentNon- Permanent Total Japanese Nationals staying abroad Foreign residents in Japan Table 2 Development of Permanent and Non-Permanent Residents Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Justice Total 044444671,3791,846Other 1,5809,81811,3981,4898,57110,060Africa* 33,955124,553158,5486,86150,30257,163Europe 91,347 10,547101,89461,936281,699343,635Latin America 129,606240,033369,639 10,16053,11163,271North America 27,86635,15263,0181,03115,045160,726 Oceania 7,399199,122206,520661,019761,9601,422,979Asia 291,793619,269911,062742,9631,172,0671,915,030Total permanentLong-termPermanentNon- Permanent Total Japanese Nationals staying abroad Foreign residents in Japan Table 3 Geographical Distribution of Permanent and Non-Permanent Residents Source; Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Justice Note: * includes middle east. 475,952489,900500,782512,269522,677Special Permanent Residents (old comer) 45,16638,18132,36627,08222,080Others 17,21313,97511,0597,4964,756Peru 41,77131,20320,2779,0624,592Philippines 39,73332,79626,96720,93314,884N+S Korea 39,80737,12134,62431,95528,766Brazil 83,32170,59958,77848,80937,960China: 267,011223,875184,071145,336113,038Ordinary permanent residents ( new comer) 742,963713775684,852657,605635,715Permanent residents 200320022001 20001999 Table 4 Changing Composition of Permanent Residents Source; Ministry of Justice 2 Composition of foreigners according to skill - In addition to the ban on accepting unskilled workers, the basic policy actively to accept the highly-skilled foreigners has been inaugurated since 1990, which might have been one of the most advanced practices of migration policy at that time. - The Government of Japan stressed the importance of mobilizing the highly skilled related to trade in services during the Uruguay Round negotiation on the movement of natural persons and contributed to standard setting of such commitments. - The status of residence “Specialist in Humanities” and “Engineer” may be issued also to foreign students who graduated from universities in Japan. - Such adjustment of statuses from foreign students to workers has been enabled already since 1980’s. (...) They are living in the prefectures like Aichi and Shizuoka, where automobile industry is concentrated and where subcontracting or worker dispatching undertakings get together - There are foreigners who have been overstaying with the status of residence “temporary stay” etc. and working particularly at unskilled jobs. - Some of them have been staying in Japan since the end of the 1980s and have got married with Japanese or have been raising children. - The number of those foreigners who get “special permission to stay” by the Ministry of Justice from humanitarian reasons has been remarkably growing for the past several years. 870,000 +α 830,000 +α 750,000 +α 620,000 +α ―Foreign workers without Special Permanent Residents Status A+B+ C+D+ E 86,94271,09039,15417,412―Worker with Ordinary Permanent Resident status E 790,000760,000710,000600,000260,000Total Temporary workersA+B+C+ D 548,300555,205513,080510,858189,255Low- or Unskilled workers UnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownNon-designated activities 219,428232,121233,187284,744106,497Overstaying foreigners 230,866239,744 220,458193,74871,803Worker of Japanese descendant 98,00683,34059,43532,36610,935Part-time work of students D 53,50346,45529,749 6,5583,260 Designated activities (including: Technical Intern, Internship, Working holiday etc.)
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Score: 1288810.4 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...nts/pdf/expert/8/Iguchi_pp.pdf
Data Source: un
The Organization does not apply the practice in dispute to all staff with permanent resident status in a country which is not their country of nationality, and the Office of Legal Affairs acknowledged in its advice that there was a need to amend ST/AI/2000/19 (Visa status of non-United States staff members serving in the United States, members of their household and their household employees, and staff members seeking or holding permanent resident status in the United States) so that it could be applied to staff members of all nationalities. (...) UNDT/2012/004 Page 9 of 19 member to retain permanent resident status was not in the Organization’s interest. (...) (c) A staff member who has changed his or her residential status in such a way that he or she may, in the opinion of the Secretary-General, be deemed to be a permanent resident of any country other than that of his or her nationality may lose entitlement to non-resident’s allowance, home leave, education grant, repatriation grant and payment of travel expenses upon separation for the staff member and his or her spouse and dependent children and removal of household effects, based upon place of home leave, if the Secretary-General considers that the continuation of such entitlement would be contrary to the purposes for which the allowance or benefit was created.
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Score: 1287965.3 - https://www.un.org/en/internal...t/judgments/undt-2012-004e.pdf
Data Source: un
The second course would be to draft a special convention to confer a status upon non-refugee stateless persons. The third course would be to drop the question of non-refugee stateless persons until further notice. (...) It may be that some States would not be prepared to grant to non-refugee stateless persons the status which they grant to refugees. (...) CHAPTER III JURIDICAL CONDITION Article 4 Personal status 1. The personal status of refugees (and stateless persons) shall be governed by the law of their country of domicile or, failing such, by the law of their country of residence.
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Score: 1287682.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/3ae68c280.html
Data Source: un
This three-level variable has been dichotomized for the purposes of the present analysis into poor general health status (coded as 1) and non-poor general health status (coded as 0). (...) Finally, in model 4, introducing further controls for number of co-resident sons does not change the impact of marital status on poor general health for older women (odds ratio of married vs. non-married remains at 1.49 (95 per cent C. (...) The lack of impact of co-resident sons on marital status differences in self-reported general health and, indeed, on the health status of older women is broadly consistent with earlier longitudinal research on mortality that showed that non-co-resident sons may be just as important as co-resident sons and that proximity does not necessarily confer any particular advantage.
Language:English
Score: 1110848.3 - https://www.un.org/development...les/unpd_egm_200002_rahman.pdf
Data Source: un