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You get proportionally more if you are poor and old than if you are rich and old, so the pension systems indirectly also serve the purpose of redistributing from the rich to the poor. (...) Part of the redistribution goes through the taxation system as well: European tax systems tend to be more progressive than the American tax system. Therefore the American rich pay much lower taxes than the European rich. (...) According to this survey, 69 per cent of Americans versus 29 per cent of Europeans believe that the poor could become rich if they tried hard enough.
Language:English
Score: 1558186 - https://unece.org/DAM/oes/disc_papers/ECE_DP_2006-3.pdf
Data Source: un
Ronald Lee, UC Berkeley, 2009 Age Profiles of Labor Income and Consumption for Four Rich, Four Poor, and Five Latin American Countries 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Age R at io to a v yl (3 0- 49 ) Latin America (BR,CH,CR,MX,UY) Rich (US,JP,SE,FI) Poor (ID,IN,PH,KE) Shape of LA is more similar to poor countries. (...) Ronald Lee, UC Berkeley, 2009 Why is the Latin American consumption so high relative to average labor income? (...) Ronald Lee, UC Berkeley, 2009 Age Profiles of Labor Income and Consumption for Four Rich, Four Poor, and Five Latin American Countries 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Age R at io to a v yl (3 0- 49 ) Latin America (BR,CH,CR,MX,UY) Rich (US,JP,SE,FI) Poor (ID,IN,PH,KE) Consumption minus labor income is “life cycle deficit”.
Language:English
Score: 1400192.3 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...files/events/files/rlee_v5.pdf
Data Source: un
But we can learn from the example of those developing countries that are catching up with rich ones. Take South Korea. Thirty years ago, it was as poor as Ghana; now, it is as rich as Portugal. (...) Not so. The new WTO study finds that the poor tend to benefit from the faster economic growth that trade liberalization brings. (...) The poor as well as the rich need globalization. Thank you.  
Language:English
Score: 1393872 - https://www.wto.org/spanish/news_s/spmm_s/spmm32_s.htm
Data Source: un
But we can learn from the example of those developing countries that are catching up with rich ones. Take South Korea. Thirty years ago, it was as poor as Ghana; now, it is as rich as Portugal. (...) Not so. The new WTO study finds that the poor tend to benefit from the faster economic growth that trade liberalization brings. (...) The poor as well as the rich need globalization. Thank you.  
Language:English
Score: 1393872 - https://www.wto.org/english/news_e/spmm_e/spmm32_e.htm
Data Source: un
But we can learn from the example of those developing countries that are catching up with rich ones. Take South Korea. Thirty years ago, it was as poor as Ghana; now, it is as rich as Portugal. (...) Not so. The new WTO study finds that the poor tend to benefit from the faster economic growth that trade liberalization brings. (...) The poor as well as the rich need globalization. Thank you.  
Language:English
Score: 1393872 - https://www.wto.org/french/news_f/spmm_f/spmm32_f.htm
Data Source: un
Just as we went from hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural, feudal societies and then into the industrial age, so today we are in the post industrial age. 100 years ago over 80% of New Zealanders or Americans were on the land, now it is less than 10%. (...) But we can learn from the example of those developing countries that are catching up with the rich ones. Take South Korea. Thirty years ago, it was as poor as Ghana; now it is as rich as Portugal. (...) Not so. The new WTO study finds that the poor tend to benefit from the faster economic growth that trade liberalisation brings.
Language:English
Score: 1389776.2 - https://www.wto.org/spanish/news_s/spmm_s/spmm34_s.htm
Data Source: un
Just as we went from hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural, feudal societies and then into the industrial age, so today we are in the post industrial age. 100 years ago over 80% of New Zealanders or Americans were on the land, now it is less than 10%. (...) But we can learn from the example of those developing countries that are catching up with the rich ones. Take South Korea. Thirty years ago, it was as poor as Ghana; now it is as rich as Portugal. (...) Not so. The new WTO study finds that the poor tend to benefit from the faster economic growth that trade liberalisation brings.
Language:English
Score: 1389776.2 - https://www.wto.org/english/news_e/spmm_e/spmm34_e.htm
Data Source: un
Just as we went from hunter-gatherer societies to agricultural, feudal societies and then into the industrial age, so today we are in the post industrial age. 100 years ago over 80% of New Zealanders or Americans were on the land, now it is less than 10%. (...) But we can learn from the example of those developing countries that are catching up with the rich ones. Take South Korea. Thirty years ago, it was as poor as Ghana; now it is as rich as Portugal. (...) Not so. The new WTO study finds that the poor tend to benefit from the faster economic growth that trade liberalisation brings.
Language:English
Score: 1389776.2 - https://www.wto.org/french/news_f/spmm_f/spmm34_f.htm
Data Source: un
It is great that Swedes eat Chinese food, watch American films, and read Latin American books. It is heartening that you celebrated when apartheid fell in South Africa and were horrified when people were butchered in Rwanda. (...) Opponents of free trade retort that poor countries are still not catching up with rich ones, indeed that the rich are drawing further ahead. (...) How does raising the price of cars so that only the rich can afford them help working people?
Language:English
Score: 1365731.6 - https://www.wto.org/spanish/news_s/spmm_s/spmm33_s.htm
Data Source: un
It is great that Swedes eat Chinese food, watch American films, and read Latin American books. It is heartening that you celebrated when apartheid fell in South Africa and were horrified when people were butchered in Rwanda. (...) Opponents of free trade retort that poor countries are still not catching up with rich ones, indeed that the rich are drawing further ahead. (...) How does raising the price of cars so that only the rich can afford them help working people?
Language:English
Score: 1365731.6 - https://www.wto.org/french/news_f/spmm_f/spmm33_f.htm
Data Source: un