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DRAFT PROGRAMME OF WORK OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION COORDINATION OFFICE FOR THE PERIOD 2018–2022
Governments are also encouraged to invest in national programmes to improve nutrient use efficiency to guard against land degradation (caused by over-exploitation of soil nutrient resources without replenishment). (...) The following are the main work areas of the nutrient pollution mitigation subprogramme, which also forms the basis for the work of the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management, with particular emphasis on countries faced with a high risk of coastal eutrophication and/or land degradation associated with nutrient mining. (...) Through this effort, Governments would be encouraged to consider setting targets for improved nutrient use efficiency and to strengthen regulatory guidelines; (iii) Conduct region-specific economic valuations on the impacts of nutrient pollution and the benefits of sustainable nutrient management (including nutrient recycling) to assist countries in designing appropriate policy and fiscal incentive programmes to encourage improved practices in industry and agriculture; (iv) Contribute to applied research on nutrient cycling and nutrient management at the global, regional and country levels to improve understanding of the complexity of global nutrient cycles and the potential for recycling organic nutrient sources, in order to develop practices that improve use efficiency and policy options based on sound science; (b) Expanded piloting and replication of appropriate on-the-ground solutions that demonstrate best practice for sustainable nutrient management and pollution reduction, with a focus on developing countries: (i) Develop project and programme proposals and secure resources for national initiatives on nutrient pollution mitigation and sustainable nutrient management with a focus on the agricultural sector and the sectors reliant on use of detergents: This would focus particularly on developing countries at high risk of ecosystem impairment and social and economic disruption due to coastal eutrophication and land degradation (from nutrient mining).
Language:English
Score: 998597.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.4/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
IMPROVED NUTRIENT USE AND MANURE MANAGEMENT TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE AND RESILIENT AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS. WORKSHOP REPORT BY THE SECRETARIAT
Nutrient management systems may not react linearly to management interventions. (...) (b) How did your country address co-benefits and synergies with multiple objectives when improving nutrient use and manure management? (c) How did your country set goals and measure progress in improving nutrient use and manure management? (...) Participants agreed that emissions and other pollution result from inefficient use of nutrients, and that multiple benefits would come from all actors committing to implementing measures to avoid nutrient loss.
Language:English
Score: 998144 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...?open&DS=FCCC/SB/2020/1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES AT THE NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LEVELS OVER THE PERIOD 2012–2017
The Coordination Office, through the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management, published two key documents: the report Our Nutrient World: the challenge to produce more food and energy with less pollution (2013)1 and the technical paper “Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Nutrient Performance Indicators” (2015).2 The report, which was produced by a group of 50 scientists representing 15 nationalities working for various institutions, including the fertilizer industry, provides a concise overview of the state of knowledge of the nutrient challenge. (...) The Coordination Office, through the GEF-supported Global Nutrient Cycle project, developed quantitative modelling approaches on coastal nutrient enrichment, and reached consensus with a number of agencies and institutions with regard to sharing data and reassessing the nutrient load data of the Global Nutrient Export from Watersheds working group. (...) The session was followed by a familiarization exercise and nutrient round-table workshop organized during the eighth GEF Biennial International Waters Conference, held in Negombo, Sri Lanka, from 9 to 13 May 2016, which was attended by participants from 20 countries.5 The nutrient management toolbox is hosted on the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management web portal.6 19.
Language:English
Score: 995925 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.4/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
PROPOSED PROGRAMME OF WORK OF THE UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION COORDINATION OFFICE FOR 2012–2016
Global Partnership on Nutrient Management 18. Governments are invited to commit themselves to promoting the sustainable use of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous) by making full use of the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management. (...) Web-based information platform for nutrients operational and at least 30,000 hits per month recorded. (...) At least 80 per cent nutrient removal and 70 per cent nutrient recycling rates verified in selected demonstration sites.
Language:English
Score: 992329.3 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
DRAFT MEDIUM-TERM WORK-PLAN FOR THE FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF THE EFFECT-ORIENTED ACTIVITIES : NOTE / BY THE BUREAU OF THE WORKING GROUP ON EFFECTS IN COLLABORATION WITH THE SECRETARIAT
In addition to acidifying compounds (S and N) and nutrient nitrogen, special attention should be devoted to the environmental and health effects of ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), heavy metals (HMs) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). (...) ICP on Integrated Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Ecosystems 2001: - Scientific paper on trends in acidity and nutrient nitrogen (assessment of S, N, base cations and H+ data). 2002: - Report on concentrations, pools and fluxes of heavy metals at selected sites; - Report on site-specific dynamic modelling and impact scenario assessment (first results). 2003: - Joint report (in cooperation with ICP Forests/EU Intensive Monitoring Programme) on air pollution effects on understorey vegetation (bioindication); - Scientific paper on concentrations, pools and fluxes of heavy metals at selected sites; - Scientific paper on proton budgets, including an assessment of the relative effects of nitrogen processes. 2004: - Scientific paper on recovery and trends in acidity and nutrient nitrogen; - Report on site-specific dynamic modelling and impact scenario assessment. 11. ICP on Mapping Critical Levels and Loads 2001: - Review of critical limits of acidity and nutrient nitrogen; - Preliminary updated maps of critical loads of acidity and nutrient nitrogen (and their exceedances). 2002: - Workshop on empirical critical loads of nutrient nitrogen; - Dynamic modelling of acidity and nutrient nitrogen on a European scale; preliminary results (in collaboration with all ICPs); - Critical levels of ozone on level II and maps (in collaboration with ICP Forests and ICP Vegetation); - Critical limits of heavy metals in soils. 2003: - Preliminary updated critical loads of acidity and nutrient nitrogen and maps of their exceedances (for information to TFIAM); - Preliminary level II critical levels of ozone maps (in collaboration with ICP Forests and ICP Vegetation); - Preliminary maps of critical loads of heavy metals (for information to TFIAM); - Critical loads and dynamic modelling at forest sites (in collaboration with ICP Forests and ICP Integrated Monitoring). 2004: - (Final) updated maps of critical loads of acidity and nutrient nitrogen and their exceedances (to TFIAM); - Results of dynamic modelling of acidity and nutrient nitrogen on a European scale (to TFIAM); - (Final) maps of level II ozone critical levels (to TFIAM); - (Final) maps of critical loads of heavy metals (to TFIAM). 12.
Language:English
Score: 978993.6 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...n&DS=EB.AIR/WG.1/2001/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
DRAFT MANILA DECLARATION ON FURTHERING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES
.: General 2 November 2011 Original: English Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities Third session Manila, 25–27 January 2012 Item 5 of the provisional agenda of the high-level segment* Adoption of the ministerial declaration Draft Manila Declaration on Furthering the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities We, the representatives of …………....Governments and the European Union, with the valued support and concurrence of representatives of international financial institutions, international and regional organizations, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, other stakeholders and major groups, Having met in Manila from 25 to 27 January 2012 at the third session of the Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities, Recognizing that people depend on the oceans and coasts and their resources for their survival, health and well-being, that a substantial proportion of the world’s population derives its food security and economic livelihood from the coastal and marine environment and that that environment, including in particular low-lying coastal areas and small island developing States, is vulnerable to rising sea levels, climate-related natural disasters and ocean acidification resulting from land-based activities, Noting the steady urbanization of coastal areas and the fact that the major threats to the health, productivity and biodiversity of the marine environment result from human activities on land, Recognizing that sewage and wastewater, persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, oils, nutrients and sediments, whether carried by rivers or discharged directly into coastal areas, take a severe toll on human health and well-being and on coastal and marine ecosystems, Recognizing also that the marine environment is threatened by physical alterations of the coastal zone, including destruction of habitats of vital importance to maintaining ecosystem health and services such as coral reefs, coastal tidal flats, deltas, mangroves and estuaries, Recognizing further the intrinsic links between marine, coastal and freshwater ecosystems and human well-being and the importance of the Global Programme of Action in dealing with the interaction of land and ocean and the need for integrated watershed and coastal management in efforts * UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/1. UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/5 2 to achieve the effective sustainable management of land-based activities, including the incorporation of the value of ecosystem services into planning processes, Acknowledging that the Global Programme of Action is an effective tool for integrating environmental concerns into development planning and strategies at the regional and national levels and that, as such, it contributes substantially to the attainment of internationally agreed development goals, Recognizing the importance of the regional seas programmes in tackling the accelerating degradation of the world’s oceans and coastal areas through the sustainable management and use of the marine and coastal environment, by engaging neighbouring countries in comprehensive and specific actions, including the development and implementation of protocols on land-based sources and activities, and through integrated coastal zone management, among other things, Recognizing also the important contributions of the regional seas programmes, the Global Environment Facility and international financial institutions in implementing the Global Programme of Action, in addition to the financial constraints to such implementation and the consequent need for resource mobilization and support, Recognizing further the achievements in the implementation of the Global Programme of Action over the period 2007–2011 and, in particular, the contribution d of the Global Programme of Action Coordination Office in the Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems Branch of the United Nations Environment Programme’s Division of Environmental Policy Implementation, Recognizing the importance of improved coastal water quality and the need for improved monitoring to identify threats to the marine environment at the regional, national and local levels through the regular process for global reporting and assessment of the state of the marine environment, including socio-economic aspects, Acknowledging the large increases in the levels of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous entering the world’s environment as a result of human activity and noting the severity of the environmental problems caused by nutrient excess, including eutrophication of coastal waters and oxygen depletion, and the associated damage to ecosystems, biodiversity and coastal water quality, Recognizing the relevance of the Honolulu Commitment, which establishes a cross-sectoral approach to helping to reduce the occurrence of marine litter and the damage that it causes to marine habitats, the global economy, biodiversity and human health, and of the Honolulu Strategy, a results-oriented framework for reducing the amount and impact of marine litter from land-based and sea-based sources and marine debris accumulations, adopted at the Fifth International Marine Debris Conference, which was co-organized by the United Nations Environment Programme and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the United States of America and took place in Honolulu from 20 to 25 March 2011, Recognizing also the significant progress made by some countries in building institutional capacity and developing legislative frameworks, environmental policies and market-based instruments for the sustainable management of the marine and coastal environment, Acknowledging the important contribution of multi-stakeholder partnerships in the implementation of the Global Programme of Action and in the implementation of intergovernmental commitments to advance action on internationally agreed and recognized goals, Emphasising the need to maintain the currency and relevance of the Global Programme of Action by focusing action mainly on nutrients, sewage, marine litter and physical alterations and destruction of habitats as agreed by Governments at the second session of the Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities, held in Beijing in 2006, Recognizing the importance of the forthcoming United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, at which global leaders will meet to reaffirm their commitments to sustainable development and to tackle emerging challenges, in by strategically advancing the stewardship of oceans, coasts and islands, 1. (...) Commit ourselves to furthering the implementation of the Global Programme of Action with a focus on the programme of work agreed upon for 2012–2016, including through intersessional meetings of the Global Programme of Action as necessary, and to that end: (a) Agree to devote additional efforts and financial resources to expedite the implementation of the programme of work of the Global Programme of Action for 2012–2016; (b) Also agree actively to engage ourselves and step up our efforts to develop policies on the sustainable use of nutrients and nutrient management strategies to improve the nutrient use efficiency of manufactured fertilizer by 20 per cent over the period 2012–2016 so as to protect the environment and reduce the cost of fertilizer use; (c) Adopt a multi-stakeholder partnership approach to the priority source categories of the Global Programme Approach and to that end: (i) Agree to support the further development of the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management as a catalyst for political and institutional engagement in international and regional forums seeking to build a common agenda for tackling nutrient challenges and associated regional and national stakeholder partnerships; (ii) Also agree to guide and support the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management in its undertaking of a global assessment for a comprehensive understanding of the complex cycle of the two main nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, and associated environmental impacts leading to the development of a broad range of actions that will ultimately reduce the environmental impact of unused nutrients; (iii) Further agree to work with all stakeholders concerned in the light of the Honolulu Commitment and the Honolulu Strategy to find solutions to the marine litter problem, including by sharing technical, legal, policy, community-based, economic and market-based means of preventing, reducing and managing marine litter; (iv) Agree to share among stakeholders information on good practices for wastewater management for the purposes of environmental protection, sanitation, climate change and nutrient benefits so as to prompt coordinated action; (d) Agree to support and facilitate initiatives that turn waste into a resource in an environmentally sustainable manner by developing global, regional, national and local targets for reducing marine litter and by improving global knowledge, understanding and monitoring of the scale, nature and sources of marine litter and its impact on human health, marine habitats, biodiversity and economic development; (e) Also agree to make wise investments in wastewater management and to recommit ourselves to promoting and demonstrating environment-friendly and resource-recycling approaches to wastewater and to tackling the adverse impacts of excess nutrients in wastewater discharges as part of the overall solution and approach to improved sanitation and human health; 4.
Language:English
Score: 976819.5 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
POLICY GUIDANCE FOR IMPLEMENTING THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES OVER THE PERIOD 2012–2016
Concerning nutrients, marine litter and sewage, the Office, working with its partners, responded to the diverse and challenging nature of the problems by proposing partnerships and initiatives on nutrients, wastewater and marine litter. (...) Effective action on nutrients and wastewater, which are major contributors to eutrophication, has proven elusive, especially in developing countries. (...) In terms of treating wastewater, the nutrient-cleaning capacity of natural systems such as lagoons, ponds, and wetlands could be better used.
Language:English
Score: 973729 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
WORLD DAY TO COMBAT DESERTIFICATION
These microorganisms include billions of bacteria, fungi and microbes that help recycle, free up and fix soil nutrients, which are then absorbed by plant rooting systems. These below-ground organisms require basic necessities to function properly, including water, nutrients and air, without which they cannot help produce the food and fibre that above-ground organisms need to thrive. (...) Food quantity is highly correlated to the available nutrients and water in soil, among other things. Food quality is determined by the quality of the soil, either in terms of the type of crops grown, e.g., cereals, vegetables, trees, etc., or the nutrient content of the harvested product.
Language:English
Score: 972193 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...WA/SDPD/2015/PAMPHLET.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
United Nations EC
Nutrients in coastal seawaters......................................................................... 36–38 7 D. (...) The members of the Joint Task Force from the Republic of Moldova apologized for the delay and informed participants that they would provide information on the indicator shortly. B. Nutrients in freshwater 17. The consultant to the secretariat then presented a summary of country reviews on the following three sub-indicators: nutrients in rivers, nutrients in lakes and nutrients in groundwaters. 1. (...) A similar approach applied to groundwater used for industrial needs. C. Nutrients in coastal seawaters 36. A consultant to the secretariat presented a summary of national reviews on the indicator on nutrients in coastal seawaters.
Language:English
Score: 971986.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ECE/CEP-CES/GE.1/2011/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES AT THE INTERNATIONAL, REGIONAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS DURING THE PERIOD 2019–2021**
A GEF-funded Global Nutrient Cycle (GNC) project, which was supported by the Coordination Office, was completed in April 2019. The main outputs of the GNC project were the development of a global nutrient management toolbox to demonstrate the importance of leveraging diverse partners towards nutrients management from field to national scale; and the development of a nutrient flow model – and an application of the global NEWS model, scaling it down to Manila Bay. (...) The BSAP is supported by the HELCOM Nutrient Reduction Scheme, a regional approach to sharing the burden of nutrient reductions and the Baltic Sea Regional Nutrient Recycling Strategy. 58.
Language:English
Score: 968560.45 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.5/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods