Home

Results 21 - 30 of 10,504 for nutrient. Search took 1.982 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
GENERATION, COMPILATION AND DISSEMINATION OF CULTIVAR-SPECIFIC NUTRIENT COMPOSITION DATA 7 - 21 4. RELATIVE PRIORITY OF OBTAINING CULTIVAR-SPECIFIC DIETARY CONSUMPTION DATA 22 - 27 5. (...) GENERATION, COMPILATION AND DISSEMINATION OF CULTIVAR-SPECIFIC NUTRIENT COMPOSITION DATA 7. Many factors are known to affect the nutrient content of foods, including climate, geography and geochemistry, agricultural practices such as fertilization, and the genetic composition of the cultivar. (...) Similar papers on the nutrient content of various plant genetic resources have also been published. 10.
Language:English
Score: 978102.2 - https://www.fao.org/uploads/me...or_food_and_agriculture_02.pdf
Data Source: un
DRAFT MANILA DECLARATION ON FURTHERING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES
.: General 2 November 2011 Original: English Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities Third session Manila, 25–27 January 2012 Item 5 of the provisional agenda of the high-level segment* Adoption of the ministerial declaration Draft Manila Declaration on Furthering the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities We, the representatives of …………....Governments and the European Union, with the valued support and concurrence of representatives of international financial institutions, international and regional organizations, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, other stakeholders and major groups, Having met in Manila from 25 to 27 January 2012 at the third session of the Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities, Recognizing that people depend on the oceans and coasts and their resources for their survival, health and well-being, that a substantial proportion of the world’s population derives its food security and economic livelihood from the coastal and marine environment and that that environment, including in particular low-lying coastal areas and small island developing States, is vulnerable to rising sea levels, climate-related natural disasters and ocean acidification resulting from land-based activities, Noting the steady urbanization of coastal areas and the fact that the major threats to the health, productivity and biodiversity of the marine environment result from human activities on land, Recognizing that sewage and wastewater, persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, oils, nutrients and sediments, whether carried by rivers or discharged directly into coastal areas, take a severe toll on human health and well-being and on coastal and marine ecosystems, Recognizing also that the marine environment is threatened by physical alterations of the coastal zone, including destruction of habitats of vital importance to maintaining ecosystem health and services such as coral reefs, coastal tidal flats, deltas, mangroves and estuaries, Recognizing further the intrinsic links between marine, coastal and freshwater ecosystems and human well-being and the importance of the Global Programme of Action in dealing with the interaction of land and ocean and the need for integrated watershed and coastal management in efforts * UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/1. UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/5 2 to achieve the effective sustainable management of land-based activities, including the incorporation of the value of ecosystem services into planning processes, Acknowledging that the Global Programme of Action is an effective tool for integrating environmental concerns into development planning and strategies at the regional and national levels and that, as such, it contributes substantially to the attainment of internationally agreed development goals, Recognizing the importance of the regional seas programmes in tackling the accelerating degradation of the world’s oceans and coastal areas through the sustainable management and use of the marine and coastal environment, by engaging neighbouring countries in comprehensive and specific actions, including the development and implementation of protocols on land-based sources and activities, and through integrated coastal zone management, among other things, Recognizing also the important contributions of the regional seas programmes, the Global Environment Facility and international financial institutions in implementing the Global Programme of Action, in addition to the financial constraints to such implementation and the consequent need for resource mobilization and support, Recognizing further the achievements in the implementation of the Global Programme of Action over the period 2007–2011 and, in particular, the contribution d of the Global Programme of Action Coordination Office in the Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems Branch of the United Nations Environment Programme’s Division of Environmental Policy Implementation, Recognizing the importance of improved coastal water quality and the need for improved monitoring to identify threats to the marine environment at the regional, national and local levels through the regular process for global reporting and assessment of the state of the marine environment, including socio-economic aspects, Acknowledging the large increases in the levels of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous entering the world’s environment as a result of human activity and noting the severity of the environmental problems caused by nutrient excess, including eutrophication of coastal waters and oxygen depletion, and the associated damage to ecosystems, biodiversity and coastal water quality, Recognizing the relevance of the Honolulu Commitment, which establishes a cross-sectoral approach to helping to reduce the occurrence of marine litter and the damage that it causes to marine habitats, the global economy, biodiversity and human health, and of the Honolulu Strategy, a results-oriented framework for reducing the amount and impact of marine litter from land-based and sea-based sources and marine debris accumulations, adopted at the Fifth International Marine Debris Conference, which was co-organized by the United Nations Environment Programme and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the United States of America and took place in Honolulu from 20 to 25 March 2011, Recognizing also the significant progress made by some countries in building institutional capacity and developing legislative frameworks, environmental policies and market-based instruments for the sustainable management of the marine and coastal environment, Acknowledging the important contribution of multi-stakeholder partnerships in the implementation of the Global Programme of Action and in the implementation of intergovernmental commitments to advance action on internationally agreed and recognized goals, Emphasising the need to maintain the currency and relevance of the Global Programme of Action by focusing action mainly on nutrients, sewage, marine litter and physical alterations and destruction of habitats as agreed by Governments at the second session of the Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities, held in Beijing in 2006, Recognizing the importance of the forthcoming United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, at which global leaders will meet to reaffirm their commitments to sustainable development and to tackle emerging challenges, in by strategically advancing the stewardship of oceans, coasts and islands, 1. (...) Commit ourselves to furthering the implementation of the Global Programme of Action with a focus on the programme of work agreed upon for 2012–2016, including through intersessional meetings of the Global Programme of Action as necessary, and to that end: (a) Agree to devote additional efforts and financial resources to expedite the implementation of the programme of work of the Global Programme of Action for 2012–2016; (b) Also agree actively to engage ourselves and step up our efforts to develop policies on the sustainable use of nutrients and nutrient management strategies to improve the nutrient use efficiency of manufactured fertilizer by 20 per cent over the period 2012–2016 so as to protect the environment and reduce the cost of fertilizer use; (c) Adopt a multi-stakeholder partnership approach to the priority source categories of the Global Programme Approach and to that end: (i) Agree to support the further development of the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management as a catalyst for political and institutional engagement in international and regional forums seeking to build a common agenda for tackling nutrient challenges and associated regional and national stakeholder partnerships; (ii) Also agree to guide and support the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management in its undertaking of a global assessment for a comprehensive understanding of the complex cycle of the two main nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, and associated environmental impacts leading to the development of a broad range of actions that will ultimately reduce the environmental impact of unused nutrients; (iii) Further agree to work with all stakeholders concerned in the light of the Honolulu Commitment and the Honolulu Strategy to find solutions to the marine litter problem, including by sharing technical, legal, policy, community-based, economic and market-based means of preventing, reducing and managing marine litter; (iv) Agree to share among stakeholders information on good practices for wastewater management for the purposes of environmental protection, sanitation, climate change and nutrient benefits so as to prompt coordinated action; (d) Agree to support and facilitate initiatives that turn waste into a resource in an environmentally sustainable manner by developing global, regional, national and local targets for reducing marine litter and by improving global knowledge, understanding and monitoring of the scale, nature and sources of marine litter and its impact on human health, marine habitats, biodiversity and economic development; (e) Also agree to make wise investments in wastewater management and to recommit ourselves to promoting and demonstrating environment-friendly and resource-recycling approaches to wastewater and to tackling the adverse impacts of excess nutrients in wastewater discharges as part of the overall solution and approach to improved sanitation and human health; 4.
Language:English
Score: 977601.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Iodine Seafood is in practice the only natural source of this crucial nutrient. Iodine serves several purposes like aiding thyroid function. (...) Seafood and crucial nutrients for healthy development Throughout the world, expectant mothers face demanding nutritional needs. (...) In Chile, salmon meat is scraped off frames and heads to produce fish patties and sausages. KEY NUTRIENTS IN SEAFOOD:
Language:English
Score: 976608.6 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...cs/BlueGrowthNutritionRev2.pdf
Data Source: un
Healthy soils recycle essential plant nutrients, improve soil structure with positive repercussions for soil water and nutrient holding capacity, and ultimately improve crop production. (...) Integrated Nutrient Management refers to the maintenance of soil fertility and plant nutrient supply at an optimum level for sustaining the desired productivity. (...) How do soils recycle nutrients? How do soils recycle nutrients? Nutrients in soil are recycled through the decomposition of organic matter coming from plant or animal sources.
Language:English
Score: 976332.8 - https://www.fao.org/soils-2015/faq/en/
Data Source: un
POLICY GUIDANCE FOR IMPLEMENTING THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES OVER THE PERIOD 2012–2016
Concerning nutrients, marine litter and sewage, the Office, working with its partners, responded to the diverse and challenging nature of the problems by proposing partnerships and initiatives on nutrients, wastewater and marine litter. (...) Effective action on nutrients and wastewater, which are major contributors to eutrophication, has proven elusive, especially in developing countries. (...) In terms of treating wastewater, the nutrient-cleaning capacity of natural systems such as lagoons, ponds, and wetlands could be better used.
Language:English
Score: 974445.4 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.3/3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
WORLD DAY TO COMBAT DESERTIFICATION
These microorganisms include billions of bacteria, fungi and microbes that help recycle, free up and fix soil nutrients, which are then absorbed by plant rooting systems. These below-ground organisms require basic necessities to function properly, including water, nutrients and air, without which they cannot help produce the food and fibre that above-ground organisms need to thrive. (...) Food quantity is highly correlated to the available nutrients and water in soil, among other things. Food quality is determined by the quality of the soil, either in terms of the type of crops grown, e.g., cereals, vegetables, trees, etc., or the nutrient content of the harvested product.
Language:English
Score: 972976.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...WA/SDPD/2015/PAMPHLET.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
United Nations EC
Nutrients in coastal seawaters......................................................................... 36–38 7 D. (...) The members of the Joint Task Force from the Republic of Moldova apologized for the delay and informed participants that they would provide information on the indicator shortly. B. Nutrients in freshwater 17. The consultant to the secretariat then presented a summary of country reviews on the following three sub-indicators: nutrients in rivers, nutrients in lakes and nutrients in groundwaters. 1. (...) A similar approach applied to groundwater used for industrial needs. C. Nutrients in coastal seawaters 36. A consultant to the secretariat presented a summary of national reviews on the indicator on nutrients in coastal seawaters.
Language:English
Score: 972695.6 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ECE/CEP-CES/GE.1/2011/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
-according to this regulation nutrition declarationis mandatory -Energy value and nutrients reference intake (RA) ratios of the amounts scheme may optionally be included in the label. - food control system upon the responsibility of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Key nutrients of nutrition declaration ; -Energy value -fat, -saturated fat -carbohydrate - sugars -protein -salt -Scientific Committe of Ministry of Health prepared citeria and Ministry of Health proposed a format for front of package labelling (traffic lightlabelling) to the Ministry of Agirculture and Forestry. (...) -Implementing Surveys about food labelling and consumer behaviour. - multi-sectorial cooperation - definition of sugar/free sugar/ addedd sugar on nutrition declaration - trans fats elimination for all processes foods UNITED KINGDOM - European Union regulation on the mandatory nutrient declaration - Traffic light FOPL 100g / 100ml - VOLUNTARY SCHEME - Food standard agency for the research - very detailed guidance provided by companies wishing to adopt this scheme - updated in 2016 - Key nutrients Fat, TFA, total sugars, salt - Sugar is seen as the most important information - around 75% of products carry the traffic light - no push back ? - allergens notified - Goal : help people understand content of their food and help consumers make quick and easier decisions for buying healthy food - companies don’t want red on their label -public consultation in 2012 on key nutrients - 2/3 of products have logos- label / governmental evaluation in 2016 - consumers finf colors the most useful -More studies, work with the public, academics, government, health NGOs , food and drink industry - frame the language to have « red means » and « stop and think » - DEPENDING OF BREXIT NEGOCIATIONS -> ability to make traffic lights mandatory or not WHO - Nutrient declaration is a requisite to move forward in implementing FOPL - The codex changed in 2013 with a list of mandatory nutrients to be declared ; mandatory nutrient declaration should be in line with codex guidelines - FOPL is considered as supplementary nutrition information, some countries want to make it mandatory and others don’t want -> WHO is currently undertaking guidelines on nutrition labelling policies / health impacts, priority outcomes, systematic review of nutrition policy  Second expert meeting in december 2019
Language:English
Score: 972089.55 - https://www.un.org/nutrition/s...neral/mon/comments_summary.pdf
Data Source: un
PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF ACTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT FROM LAND-BASED ACTIVITIES AT THE INTERNATIONAL, REGIONAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS DURING THE PERIOD 2019–2021**
A GEF-funded Global Nutrient Cycle (GNC) project, which was supported by the Coordination Office, was completed in April 2019. The main outputs of the GNC project were the development of a global nutrient management toolbox to demonstrate the importance of leveraging diverse partners towards nutrients management from field to national scale; and the development of a nutrient flow model – and an application of the global NEWS model, scaling it down to Manila Bay. (...) The BSAP is supported by the HELCOM Nutrient Reduction Scheme, a regional approach to sharing the burden of nutrient reductions and the Baltic Sea Regional Nutrient Recycling Strategy. 58.
Language:English
Score: 969232.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=UNEP/GPA/IGR.5/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Species diversification | Conservation Agriculture | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO.org english Русский Conservation Agriculture Overview Impact In practice Case studies News Resources Minimum mechanical soil disturbance Soil organic cover Species diversification Equipment database Species diversification Crop rotation The rotation of crops is not only necessary to offer a diverse "diet" to the soil micro organisms, but as they root at different soil depths, they are capable of exploring different soil layers for nutrients. Nutrients that have been leached to deeper layers and that are no longer available for the commercial crop, can be "recycled" by the crops in rotation. (...) Better distribution of water and nutrients through the soil profile. Exploration for nutrients and water of diverse strata of the soil profile by roots of many different plant species resulting in a greater use of the available nutrients and water. (...) Means and practices: Design and implementation of crop rotations according to the various objectives: food and fodder production (grain, leaf, stalks); residue production; pest and weed control; nutrient uptake and biological subsurface mixing / cultivation, etc.
Language:English
Score: 969217.3 - https://www.fao.org/conservati...ce/species-diversification/en/
Data Source: un