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Species diversification | Conservation Agriculture | Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Alimentación y la Agricultura FAO.org english Русский Español Conservation Agriculture Overview Impact In practice Estudios de casos News Recursos Minimum mechanical soil disturbance Soil organic cover Species diversification Equipment database Species diversification Crop rotation The rotation of crops is not only necessary to offer a diverse "diet" to the soil microorganisms, but as they root at different soil depths, they are capable of exploring different soil layers for nutrients. Nutrients that have been leached to deeper layers and that are no longer available for the commercial crop, can be "recycled" by the crops in rotation. (...) Better distribution of water and nutrients through the soil profile. Exploration for nutrients and water of diverse strata of the soil profile by roots of many different plant species resulting in a greater use of the available nutrients and water. (...) Means and practices: Design and implementation of crop rotations according to the various objectives: food and fodder production (grain, leaf, stalks); residue production; pest and weed control; nutrient uptake and biological subsurface mixing / cultivation, etc.
Language:English
Score: 969217.3 - https://www.fao.org/conservati...ce/species-diversification/es/
Data Source: un
Species diversification | Conservation Agriculture | 联合国粮食及 农业组织 FAO.org 中文 english Русский Conservation Agriculture Overview Impact In practice 案例研究 News 资源 Minimum mechanical soil disturbance Soil organic cover Species diversification Equipment database Species diversification Crop rotation The rotation of crops is not only necessary to offer a diverse "diet" to the soil microorganisms, but as they root at different soil depths, they are capable of exploring different soil layers for nutrients. Nutrients that have been leached to deeper layers and that are no longer available for the commercial crop, can be "recycled" by the crops in rotation. (...) Better distribution of water and nutrients through the soil profile. Exploration for nutrients and water of diverse strata of the soil profile by roots of many different plant species resulting in a greater use of the available nutrients and water. (...) Means and practices: Design and implementation of crop rotations according to the various objectives: food and fodder production (grain, leaf, stalks); residue production; pest and weed control; nutrient uptake and biological subsurface mixing / cultivation, etc.
Language:English
Score: 969217.3 - https://www.fao.org/conservati...ce/species-diversification/zh/
Data Source: un
Species diversification | Conservation Agriculture | Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture FAO.org english français Русский Conservation Agriculture Overview Impact In practice Études de cas News Ressources Minimum mechanical soil disturbance Soil organic cover Species diversification Equipment database Species diversification Crop rotation The rotation of crops is not only necessary to offer a diverse "diet" to the soil microorganisms, but as they root at different soil depths, they are capable of exploring different soil layers for nutrients. Nutrients that have been leached to deeper layers and that are no longer available for the commercial crop, can be "recycled" by the crops in rotation. (...) Better distribution of water and nutrients through the soil profile. Exploration for nutrients and water of diverse strata of the soil profile by roots of many different plant species resulting in a greater use of the available nutrients and water. (...) Means and practices: Design and implementation of crop rotations according to the various objectives: food and fodder production (grain, leaf, stalks); residue production; pest and weed control; nutrient uptake and biological subsurface mixing / cultivation, etc.
Language:English
Score: 969217.3 - https://www.fao.org/conservati...ce/species-diversification/fr/
Data Source: un
List of partners, who contributed to this inventory in Workpackage 1.5 27 Appendix 3. Percentage of nutrient retention (nutrient retention factors) 28 Appendix 4. (...) Two main types of factors are needed: yield, weight yield or weight change factors and nutrient retention factors.1 ‘Nutrient losses and gains’ cover the whole process of food preparation, covering both the nutrient retention and the yield factors. The nutrient retention factor is the term used for the absolute amount of nutrient retained in the food after preparation in relation to the absolute amount of nutrient present in the food before preparation.
Language:English
Score: 967590.9 - https://www.fao.org/uploads/me...d_gains_EroFIR_2006_D1.5.5.pdf
Data Source: un
DYNAMIC MODELLING : REPORT / BY THE CO-CHAIRS OF THE JOINT EXPERT GROUP ON DYNAMIC MODELLING
In particular, soil survey information collated for earlier acidification studies was not necessarily appropriate for nutrient N impacts. For example, little information existed on the impacts of N deposition, N availability and nutrient N status of calcareous grasslands. 15. (...) There was evidence that nutrient N had significant impact in oligotrophic surface waters, but dose-response functions did not yet exist; (b) Dose-responses for terrestrial ecosystems were complex and involved combined impacts of acidity and nutrient changes. (...) General B. Heavy metals C. Nutrient nitrogen D. Acidification E. Review of the Gothenburg Protocol F.
Language:English
Score: 966133.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ECE/EB.AIR/WG.1/2007/13&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Plant Production and Protection Division: Sustainable Agricultural Practices english FAO Home Plant Production and Protection Division Thematic sitemap Information Resources News, Events, Bulletins in Keywords Contacts NSP - Sustainable Agricultural Practices   The development of sustainable agricultural practices depends largely on promoting long term fertility and productivity of soil at economically viable levels through, for example: Matching the supply of soil nutrients with nutrient demands of crop, fodder and pasture plants: through optimising return of crop residues and animal wastes to the land and through greater reliance on biologically fixed and recycled nutrients instead of fertiliser inputs; Maintaining acceptable pest tolerance levels: through reliance on crop rotations and biocontrol agents and hence reducing or maintaining low pesticide use; Maintaining soil physical properties conducive to plant growth and to soil ecosystem functioning (aeration, water infiltration and retention, nutrient availability, etc.) through decreasing or maintaining low frequency and intensity of tillage and reducing erosion and leaching. (...) LEIA systems have high genetic and cultural diversity, multiple use of resources and efficient nutrient and mineral recycling (Altieri 1999) The search for biological alternatives to improve and maintain yields is a high priority. (...) In conventional tillage bacteria based food webs play a greater role especially in the tilled layer, and as result of flushes of mineralisation related to tillage events may lead to greater organic matter loss and lower nutrient retention. In no tillage systems fungal based food webs are more important which influence nutrient availability and soil aggregate stability, tending to increase N retention and reduce leaching.
Language:English
Score: 965725.5 - https://www.fao.org/agricultur...ble-agricultural-practices/en/
Data Source: un
Using the right fertilizer, at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place optimizes nutrient uptake by plants while reducing losses to the environment and safeguarding our Planet’s soil and water resources. What FAO is doing In their submissions to UNFCCC on KJWA (March, 2018), Parties and observer organizations identified a number of key common challenges to improve nutrient use and manure management. These include the need for a regulatory framework for addressing nutrient use; guidance for more optimized use of inorganic fertilizers; more assessment of nutrient use and manure management; definitions of agricultural techniques and timings to maximize nutrient uptake, knowledge and technology transfer; and, site-specific monitoring and modelling technology for precision agriculture to optimize nutrient use. FAO, together with other partner organizations, have developed a number of tools and methodologies, and have been leading global initiatives on the subject of nutrient use and manure management that are already addressing some of these challenges.
Language:English
Score: 965537.1 - https://www.fao.org/koronivia/topics/nutrient-use/ar/
Data Source: un
Using the right fertilizer, at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place optimizes nutrient uptake by plants while reducing losses to the environment and safeguarding our Planet’s soil and water resources. What FAO is doing In their submissions to UNFCCC on KJWA (March, 2018), Parties and observer organizations identified a number of key common challenges to improve nutrient use and manure management. These include the need for a regulatory framework for addressing nutrient use; guidance for more optimized use of inorganic fertilizers; more assessment of nutrient use and manure management; definitions of agricultural techniques and timings to maximize nutrient uptake, knowledge and technology transfer; and, site-specific monitoring and modelling technology for precision agriculture to optimize nutrient use. FAO, together with other partner organizations, have developed a number of tools and methodologies, and have been leading global initiatives on the subject of nutrient use and manure management that are already addressing some of these challenges.
Language:English
Score: 965537.1 - https://www.fao.org/koronivia/topics/nutrient-use/ru/
Data Source: un
Using the right fertilizer, at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place optimizes nutrient uptake by plants while reducing losses to the environment and safeguarding our Planet’s soil and water resources. What FAO is doing In their submissions to UNFCCC on KJWA (March, 2018), Parties and observer organizations identified a number of key common challenges to improve nutrient use and manure management. These include the need for a regulatory framework for addressing nutrient use; guidance for more optimized use of inorganic fertilizers; more assessment of nutrient use and manure management; definitions of agricultural techniques and timings to maximize nutrient uptake, knowledge and technology transfer; and, site-specific monitoring and modelling technology for precision agriculture to optimize nutrient use. FAO, together with other partner organizations, have developed a number of tools and methodologies, and have been leading global initiatives on the subject of nutrient use and manure management that are already addressing some of these challenges.
Language:English
Score: 965537.1 - https://www.fao.org/koronivia/topics/nutrientuse/ar/
Data Source: un
DRAFT GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE NITROGEN MANAGEMENT
Main Points Nitrogen is critical as a major nutrient to allow food, fibre and biofuel production. (...) The example shows how measures to reduce nutrient losses have been recognized for centuries. (...) Global Overview of Nutrient Management (Edinburgh, Centre of Ecology and Hydrology).
Language:English
Score: 963702.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=ECE/EB.AIR/2020/6&Lang=E
Data Source: ods