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Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Photo essay How families are coping during the COVID-19 lock down A tale of a mother Proscovia Nakibuuka Mbonye UNICEF Uganda/2020/Abdul 06 May 2020 In Uganda, the COVID-19 pandemic and lock down has left many families with no option but to stay home and keep safe. (...) UNICEF Uganda/2020/Abdul Not even the COVID-19 lock down can kill this smile! Jonathan poses with the ball after the soccer game with his friend Shadrack.   (...) It is a simple meal but very nutritious. With limited availability of and access to nutritious food choices in her home, coupled with increased demands for the little available, Veronica at times feels overwhelmed.
Language:English
Score: 1587727.4 - https://www.unicef.org/uganda/...ping-during-covid-19-lock-down
Data Source: un
Some of the strategies to respond to COVID-19—including physical distancing, school closures, trade restrictions, and country lock- downs—are impacting food systems by disrupting the production, transportation, and sale of nutritious, fresh, and affordable foods, forcing millions of families to rely on nutrient-poor alternatives. (...) Five actions must be taken and tracked immediately (panel). First, access to nutritious, safe, and affordable diets needs to be safeguarded and promoted as a cornerstone of the response to COVID-19. (...) Fourth, maintain the provision of nutritious and safe school meals for vulnerable children through home delivery, take-home rations, and cash or vouchers when schools are closed.
Language:English
Score: 1329696.9 - https://www.unicef.org/dominic...Time%20to%20act%20is%20now.pdf
Data Source: un
THE RIGHT TO FOOD :RESOLUTION / ADOPTED BY THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL ON 24 MARCH 2021
.: General 1 April 2021 Original: English A/HRC/RES/46/19 2 times to sufficient, adequate and nutritious food, in conformity with, inter alia, the culture, beliefs, traditions, dietary habits and preferences of individuals, and that is produced and consumed sustainably, thereby preserving access to food for future generations, Reaffirming that a peaceful, stable and enabling political, social and economic environment at both the national and international levels is the essential foundation that will enable States to give adequate priority to food security and poverty eradication, Determined to take new steps forward in the commitment of the international community with a view to achieving substantial progress in the realization of the right to food through an increased and sustained effort of international cooperation and solidarity, with a view to building a community of shared future for humanity, Reiterating, as in the Rome Declaration on World Food Security and the Declaration of the World Food Summit: five years later, that food should not be used as an instrument of political or economic pressure, and reaffirming in this regard the importance of international cooperation and solidarity, and the necessity of refraining from unilateral measures that are not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations and that endanger food and nutrition security, Reaffirming that food security is a national responsibility, and that any plan for addressing food security challenges must be nationally articulated, designed, owned and led, and built on consultation with all key stakeholders, and recognizing the commitment to strengthening the multilateral system in the channelling of resources and in the promotion of policies dedicated to fighting hunger and malnutrition, Recognizing the complex character of food insecurity and its likely recurrence owing to a combination of several major factors, such as the effects of the global financial and economic crisis, environmental degradation, desertification and the impact of global climate change, as well as poverty, natural disasters, armed conflicts, drought, excessive volatility in commodity prices and the lack in many countries of the appropriate technology, investment and capacity-building necessary to confront its impact, in particular in developing countries, including land-locked developing countries, least developed countries and small island developing States, and the need for coherence and collaboration among international institutions at the global level, Expressing its deep concern at the number and scale of human-made and natural disasters, diseases and pest infestations, as well as the negative impact of climate change, and their increasing impact in recent years, which have, in combination with other factors, resulted in substantial loss of life and livelihood and threatened agricultural production and food and nutrition security, in particular in developing countries, Recognizing in that context that the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis is exacerbating food insecurity, including through its devastating impact on the livelihoods of people, agriculture and food systems, value chains, food prices, nutrition and food security, Recognizing also that urgent steps are needed to address food insecurity for the poorest and most marginalized segments of the population, and that measures aimed at providing immediate support to satisfy people’s dietary needs should be put in place, including the provision of food and nutrition assistance, as appropriate, Emphasizing the need to urgently assist countries that are disproportionally affected by climate change and are facing drought, plague, starvation and famine-related threats that could affect millions of people, most of whom are women and children, Stressing the need to increase official development assistance devoted to agriculture, both in real terms and as a share of total official development assistance, and recognizing that small and medium-sized farmers in developing countries need to receive technical, technology transfer and capacity-building support, Recognizing the importance of the protection, preservation and sustainable use of agrobiodiversity in guaranteeing food security and the right to food for all, Reaffirming the role of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations as the key United Nations agency for rural and agricultural development and its work in A/HRC/RES/46/19 3 supporting the efforts of Member States to achieve the full realization of the right to food, including through its provision of technical assistance to developing countries in support of the implementation of national priority frameworks, Acknowledging the contribution of relevant interagency mechanisms, such as the tripartite collaboration among the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the World Organization for Animal Health and the World Health Organization, in promoting cooperation and guidance towards safe and sustainable food supplies and practices, Looking forward to the contribution of the Food Systems Summit, to be held in 2021, to the realization of the right to food, 1. (...) Also reaffirms the right of everyone to have access to safe, sufficient and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, so as to be able to fully develop and maintain his or her physical and mental capacities; 3. (...) Reaffirms the need to ensure that programmes delivering safe, sufficient, nutritious and culturally accepted food are inclusive and accessible to persons with disabilities; 15.
Language:English
Score: 1297898 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...open&DS=A/HRC/RES/46/19&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE RIGHT TO FOOD :DRAFT RESOLUTION / BELARUS, CHINA, CUBA, ECUADOR, EGYPT, FIJI, HAITI, IRAN (ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF), MEXICO, NAMIBIA, NEPAL, PARAGUAY, PERU, PHILIPPINES, SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC, TURKEY AND VENEZUELA (BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF)
.: Limited 16 March 2021 Original: English A/HRC/46/L.11 2 Acknowledging that the right to food has been recognized as the right of every individual, alone or in community with others, to have physical and economic access at all times to sufficient, adequate and nutritious food, in conformity with, inter alia, the culture, beliefs, traditions, dietary habits and preferences of individuals, and that is produced and consumed sustainably, thereby preserving access to food for future generations, Reaffirming that a peaceful, stable and enabling political, social and economic environment at both the national and international levels is the essential foundation that will enable States to give adequate priority to food security and poverty eradication, Determined to take new steps forward in the commitment of the international community with a view to achieving substantial progress in the realization of the right to food through an increased and sustained effort of international cooperation and solidarity, with a view to building a community of shared future for humanity, Reiterating, as in the Rome Declaration on World Food Security and the Declaration of the World Food Summit: five years later, that food should not be used as an instrument of political or economic pressure, and reaffirming in this regard the importance of international cooperation and solidarity, and the necessity of refraining from unilateral measures that are not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations and that endanger food and nutrition security, Reaffirming that food security is a national responsibility, and that any plan for addressing food security challenges must be nationally articulated, designed, owned and led, and built on consultation with all key stakeholders, and recognizing the commitment to strengthening the multilateral system in the channelling of resources and in the promotion of policies dedicated to fighting hunger and malnutrition, Recognizing the complex character of food insecurity and its likely recurrence owing to a combination of several major factors, such as the effects of the global financial and economic crisis, environmental degradation, desertification and the impact of global climate change, as well as poverty, natural disasters, armed conflicts, drought, excessive volatility in commodity prices and the lack in many countries of the appropriate technology, investment and capacity-building necessary to confront its impact, in particular in developing countries, including land-locked developing countries, least developed countries and small island developing States, and the need for coherence and collaboration between international institutions at the global level, Expressing its deep concern at the number and scale of human-made and natural disasters, diseases and pest infestations, as well as the negative impact of climate change, and their increasing impact in recent years, which have, in combination with other factors, resulted in substantial loss of life and livelihood and threatened agricultural production and food and nutrition security, in particular in developing countries, Recognizing in that context that the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis is exacerbating food insecurity, including through its devastating impact on the livelihoods of people, agriculture and food systems, value chains, food prices, nutrition and food security, Recognizing also that urgent steps are needed to address food insecurity for the poorest and most marginalized segments of the population, and that measures aimed at providing immediate support to satisfy people’s dietary needs should be put in place, including the provision of food and nutrition assistance, as appropriate, Emphasizing the need to urgently assist countries that are disproportionally affected by climate change and are facing drought, plague, starvation and famine-related threats that could affect millions of people, most of whom are women and children, Stressing the need to increase official development assistance devoted to agriculture, both in real terms and as a share of total official development assistance, and recognizing that small and medium-sized farmers in developing countries need to receive technical, technology transfer and capacity-building support, Recognizing the importance of the protection and preservation of agrobiodiversity in guaranteeing food security and the right to food for all, A/HRC/46/L.11 3 Reaffirming the role of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations as the key United Nations agency for rural and agricultural development and its work in supporting the efforts of Member States to achieve the full realization of the right to food, including through its provision of technical assistance to developing countries in support of the implementation of national priority frameworks, Acknowledging the contribution of relevant interagency mechanisms, such as the tripartite collaboration among the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the World Organization for Animal Health and the World Health Organization, in promoting cooperation and guidance towards safe and sustainable food supplies and practices, Looking forward to the contribution of the Food Systems Summit, to be held in 2021, to the realization of the right to food, 1. (...) Also reaffirms the right of everyone to have access to safe, sufficient and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, so as to be able to fully develop and maintain his or her physical and mental capacities; 3. (...) Reaffirms the need to ensure that programmes delivering safe, sufficient, nutritious and culturally accepted food are inclusive and accessible to persons with disabilities; 15.
Language:English
Score: 1297898 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/46/L.11&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE RIGHT TO FOOD :DRAFT RESOLUTION / BELARUS, CHINA, CUBA, EGYPT, HAITI, IRAN (ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF), MALAYSIA, MEXICO, MONACO, NICARAGUA, PAKISTAN, PARAGUAY, PERU, PHILIPPINES, PORTUGAL, SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC, THAILAND, TURKEY, VENEZUELA (BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF) AND YEMEN
.: Limited 27 March 2020 Original: English A/HRC/43/L.12 2 Stressing the importance of the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and its Framework for Action, adopted at the second International Conference on Nutrition, held in Rome on 21 November 2014, Acknowledging that the right to food has been recognized as the right of every individual, alone or in community with others, to have physical and economic access at all times to sufficient, adequate and nutritious food, in conformity with, inter alia, the culture, beliefs, traditions, dietary habits and preferences of individuals, and that is produced and consumed sustainably, thereby preserving access to food for future generations, Reaffirming that a peaceful, stable and enabling political, social and economic environment at both the national and international levels is the essential foundation that will enable States to give adequate priority to food security and poverty eradication, Determined to take new steps forward in the commitment of the international community with a view to achieving substantial progress in the realization of the right to food through an increased and sustained effort of international cooperation and solidarity, with a view to building a community of shared future for humanity, Reiterating, as in the Rome Declaration on World Food Security and the Declaration of the World Food Summit: five years later, that food should not be used as an instrument of political or economic pressure, and reaffirming in this regard the importance of international cooperation and solidarity, and the necessity of refraining from unilateral measures that are not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations and that endanger food and nutrition security, Reaffirming that food security is a national responsibility, and that any plan for addressing food security challenges must be nationally articulated, designed, owned and led, and built on consultation with all key stakeholders, and recognizing the commitment to strengthening the multilateral system in the channelling of resources and in the promotion of policies dedicated to fighting hunger and malnutrition, Recognizing the complex character of food insecurity and its likely recurrence owing to a combination of several major factors, such as the effects of the global financial and economic crisis, environmental degradation, desertification and the impact of global climate change, as well as poverty, natural disasters, armed conflicts, drought, excessive volatility in commodity prices and the lack in many countries of the appropriate technology, investment and capacity-building necessary to confront its impact, particularly in developing countries, including land-locked developing countries, least developed countries and small island developing States, and the need for coherence and collaboration between international institutions at the global level, Expressing its deep concern at the number and scale of human-made and natural disasters, diseases and pest infestations, as well as the negative impact of climate change, and their increasing impact in recent years, which have, in combination with other factors, resulted in substantial loss of life and livelihood and threatened agricultural production and food and nutrition security, in particular in developing countries, Recognizing in particular the need to urgently assist certain African countries that are facing drought, plagues, starvation and famine-related threats that could affect millions of people, most of whom are women and children, Stressing the need to increase official development assistance devoted to agriculture, both in real terms and as a share of total official development assistance, and recognizing that small and medium-sized farmers in developing countries need to receive technical, technology transfer and capacity-building support, Recognizing the importance of the protection and preservation of agrobiodiversity in guaranteeing food security and the right to food for all, Recognizing also the role of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations as the key United Nations agency for rural and agricultural development and its work in supporting the efforts of Member States to achieve the full realization of the right to food, including through its provision of technical assistance to developing countries in support of the implementation of national priority frameworks, A/HRC/43/L.12 3 Looking forward to the fifty-third session of the Commission on Population and Development, which will consider the theme “Population, food security, nutrition and sustainable development’, and noting that the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development prescribed that measures should be taken to strengthen food, nutrition and agricultural policies and programmes, 1. (...) Also reaffirms the right of everyone to have access to safe, sufficient and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, so as to be able to fully develop and maintain his or her physical and mental capacities; 3. (...) Reaffirms the need to ensure that programmes delivering safe, sufficient, nutritious and culturally accepted food are inclusive and accessible to persons with disabilities; 11.
Language:English
Score: 1297898 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/43/L.12&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE RIGHT TO FOOD :RESOLUTION / ADOPTED BY THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL ON 19 JUNE 2020
.: General 1 July 2020 Original: English A/HRC/RES/43/11 2 Acknowledging that the right to food has been recognized as the right of every individual, alone or in community with others, to have physical and economic access at all times to sufficient, adequate and nutritious food, in conformity with, inter alia, the culture, beliefs, traditions, dietary habits and preferences of individuals, and that is produced and consumed sustainably, thereby preserving access to food for future generations, Reaffirming that a peaceful, stable and enabling political, social and economic environment at both the national and international levels is the essential foundation that will enable States to give adequate priority to food security and poverty eradication, Determined to take new steps forward in the commitment of the international community with a view to achieving substantial progress in the realization of the right to food through an increased and sustained effort of international cooperation and solidarity, with a view to building a community of shared future for humanity, Reiterating, as in the Rome Declaration on World Food Security and the Declaration of the World Food Summit: five years later, that food should not be used as an instrument of political or economic pressure, and reaffirming in this regard the importance of international cooperation and solidarity, and the necessity of refraining from unilateral measures that are not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations and that endanger food and nutrition security, Reaffirming that food security is a national responsibility, and that any plan for addressing food security challenges must be nationally articulated, designed, owned and led, and built on consultation with all key stakeholders, and recognizing the commitment to strengthening the multilateral system in the channelling of resources and in the promotion of policies dedicated to fighting hunger and malnutrition, Recognizing the complex character of food insecurity and its likely recurrence owing to a combination of several major factors, such as the effects of the global financial and economic crisis, environmental degradation, desertification and the impact of global climate change, as well as poverty, natural disasters, armed conflicts, drought, excessive volatility in commodity prices and the lack in many countries of the appropriate technology, investment and capacity-building necessary to confront its impact, particularly in developing countries, including land-locked developing countries, least developed countries and small island developing States, and the need for coherence and collaboration between international institutions at the global level, Expressing its deep concern at the number and scale of human-made and natural disasters, diseases and pest infestations, as well as the negative impact of climate change, and their increasing impact in recent years, which have, in combination with other factors, resulted in substantial loss of life and livelihood and threatened agricultural production and food and nutrition security, in particular in developing countries, Recognizing in particular the need to urgently assist certain African countries that are facing drought, plague, starvation and famine-related threats that could affect millions of people, most of whom are women and children, Stressing the need to increase official development assistance devoted to agriculture, both in real terms and as a share of total official development assistance, and recognizing that small and medium-sized farmers in developing countries need to receive technical, technology transfer and capacity-building support, Recognizing the importance of the protection and preservation of agrobiodiversity in guaranteeing food security and the right to food for all, Recognizing also the role of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations as the key United Nations agency for rural and agricultural development and its work in supporting the efforts of Member States to achieve the full realization of the right to food, including through its provision of technical assistance to developing countries in support of the implementation of national priority frameworks, Looking forward to the fifty-third session of the Commission on Population and Development, which will consider the theme “Population, food security, nutrition and sustainable development”, and noting that the Programme of Action of the International A/HRC/RES/43/11 3 Conference on Population and Development prescribed that measures should be taken to strengthen food, nutrition and agricultural policies and programmes, 1. (...) Also reaffirms the right of everyone to have access to safe, sufficient and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, so as to be able to fully develop and maintain his or her physical and mental capacities; 3. (...) Reaffirms the need to ensure that programmes delivering safe, sufficient, nutritious and culturally accepted food are inclusive and accessible to persons with disabilities; 11.
Language:English
Score: 1297898 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...open&DS=A/HRC/RES/43/11&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Investing in the future: A universal benefit for Sri Lanka's children February 2020 UNICEF Sri Lanka working paper UNICEF Sri Lanka/ Earl Jayasuriya Highlights While the lives of children have improved significantly over the past decades in Sri Lanka, the majority of them are living in low-income families and, as a result, face challenges in accessing adequate, nutritious food and a good home learning environment. (...) Author(s) Stephen Kidd, Louise Moreira Daniels, Bjorn Gelders, Diloá Athias and Madeleine Cretney Publication date February 2020 Languages English Download Download file (PDF, 3,51 MB) Related topics Child rights Sri Lanka More to explore Press release 08 December 2021 Young People Speak Out to Reimagine a Better Future as UNICEF Marks 75 Years Visit the page Press release 09 September 2020 The Mayor of Batticaloa and UNICEF sign agreement to establish Sri Lanka’s first Child-Friendly Municipality Visit the page Press release 27 May 2020 UNICEF supports MOE to provide home-based learning for lower primary students during COVID-19 lock-down. Visit the page Press release 20 February 2020 SRI LANKA RANKS 68 OUT OF 180 IN NEW GLOBAL ‘CHILD FLOURISHING‘ INDEX Visit the page Footer UNICEF Sri Lanka What we do Research and reports Stories Take action About us Child-centered approach Children in Sri Lanka Sign the petition Work with us Become a donor Social Footer Secondary Legal Contact us Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 1292922.3 - https://www.unicef.org/srilank...al-benefit-sri-lankas-children
Data Source: un
This will also involve the power to grow, harvest, store, and eat their own plant protein crops, staples, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices and other elements of a nutritious,  appropriate plant-based diet.      c) Are there any disadvantages or gaps you see in the current structure   The structure does not identify the most important people in bringing food sovereignty:  the people who are currently impoverished and denied access to a basic living income, and good farm land;  the people who are currently locking in the system of artificially  breeding animals to farm, thus depriving impoverished people of food;  the people who are hoarding the land, money and other resources which communities need to secure their own nutritious, appropriate food supply.     2) With respect to the content of the different sections of the CoC:     a) What are the general guiding principles that you think are important for section 2.1?   (...) Every one has the right to a  sustainable, nutritious, appropriate plant-based diet.       b) What are the specific guiding principles and practices do you think are important for sections 2.2.1(a, b& c), 2.2.2 and 2.2.3?   (...) Food 're-distribution' as a charitable endeavour completely misses the key principle: the right to sustainable, nutritious, appropriate plant-based food must supersede any perception that non-humans or humans can be exploited for profit.     2.2.2.  
Language:English
Score: 1253118.4 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ar/comment/9590
Data Source: un
This will also involve the power to grow, harvest, store, and eat their own plant protein crops, staples, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices and other elements of a nutritious,  appropriate plant-based diet.      c) Are there any disadvantages or gaps you see in the current structure   The structure does not identify the most important people in bringing food sovereignty:  the people who are currently impoverished and denied access to a basic living income, and good farm land;  the people who are currently locking in the system of artificially  breeding animals to farm, thus depriving impoverished people of food;  the people who are hoarding the land, money and other resources which communities need to secure their own nutritious, appropriate food supply.     2) With respect to the content of the different sections of the CoC:     a) What are the general guiding principles that you think are important for section 2.1?   (...) Every one has the right to a  sustainable, nutritious, appropriate plant-based diet.       b) What are the specific guiding principles and practices do you think are important for sections 2.2.1(a, b& c), 2.2.2 and 2.2.3?   (...) Food 're-distribution' as a charitable endeavour completely misses the key principle: the right to sustainable, nutritious, appropriate plant-based food must supersede any perception that non-humans or humans can be exploited for profit.     2.2.2.  
Language:English
Score: 1253118.4 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/comment/9590
Data Source: un
For example, during the initial weeks of lock-down, the treatment of severe wasting ground to a halt in India and Nepal, while a fear of infection and lack of protective equipment for health workers led to an estimated 40 per cent and 75 percent decline in admissions to treat severe wasting in children in Afghanistan and Bangladesh respectively. (...) The heads of the four United Nations agencies appeal to governments, the public, donors and the private sector to protect children’s right to nutrition by: Safeguarding access to nutritious, safe and affordable diets as a cornerstone of the response to COVID-19 by protecting food producers, processors and retailers; discouraging trade bans; and designating food markets as essential services;  Investing decisively in support for maternal and child nutrition by protecting breastfeeding, preventing the inappropriate marketing of infant formula, and securing children and women’s access to nutritious and diverse foods; Re-activating and scaling up services for the early detection and treatment of child wasting while expanding other life-protecting nutrition services; Maintaining the provision of nutritious and safe school meals by reaching vulnerable children through home delivery, take-home rations, cash or vouchers when schools are closed; and Expanding social protection to safeguard access to nutritious diets and essential services among the poorest and most affected households, including access to fortified foods.
Language:English
Score: 1253118.4 - https://www.unicef.org/nepal/p...er-wasting-south-asia-year-due
Data Source: un