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D.180 : Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Français   Español     Home : ITU-T : Publications : Recommendations : D Series : D.180 Recently posted  -  Search Recommendations     D.180 : Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions Recommendation D.180 In force components Number Title Status D.180 (09/05)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   In force     Superseded and Withdrawn components Number Title Status D.180 (11/88)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Superseded D.180 (03/93)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Superseded D.180 (09/95)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Superseded D.180 (06/98)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Superseded D.180 (12/99)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Superseded D.180 (06/02)   Occasional provision of circuits for international sound- and television-programme transmissions   Superseded D.180 Amendment 1 (06/04)     Superseded   Top  -  Feedback  -  Contact us  -  Copyright © ITU  2008 All Rights Reserved Contact for this page :  ITU-T Publications Updated : 2010/05/11  
Language:English
Score: 967300.8 - https://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-D.180
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 – UNODA     مرحبا بكم في الأمم المتحدة العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español اللغة العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru   Download PDF English Overview Occasional Paper No. 13 is the third in a series of publications produced by the Office for Disarmament Affairs compiling the rich set of presentations and power points made by participants in three regional seminars on implementing Security Council resolution 1540 (2004) that took place in 2006. Occasional Paper No. 11 deals with the seminar held in Beijing in March for Asia and the Pacific and Occasional Paper No. 12 with the seminar held in Accra, Ghana in November for the African region.
Language:English
Score: 926319.2 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ations/occasionalpapers/no-13/
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 – UNODA     Welcome to the United Nations. العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru   Download PDF English Overview Occasional Paper No. 13 is the third in a series of publications produced by the Office for Disarmament Affairs compiling the rich set of presentations and power points made by participants in three regional seminars on implementing Security Council resolution 1540 (2004) that took place in 2006. Occasional Paper No. 11 deals with the seminar held in Beijing in March for Asia and the Pacific and Occasional Paper No. 12 with the seminar held in Accra, Ghana in November for the African region.
Language:English
Score: 910441.6 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ations/occasionalpapers/no-13/
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 – UNODA     欢迎来到联合国 العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru   Download PDF English Overview Occasional Paper No. 13 is the third in a series of publications produced by the Office for Disarmament Affairs compiling the rich set of presentations and power points made by participants in three regional seminars on implementing Security Council resolution 1540 (2004) that took place in 2006. Occasional Paper No. 11 deals with the seminar held in Beijing in March for Asia and the Pacific and Occasional Paper No. 12 with the seminar held in Accra, Ghana in November for the African region.
Language:English
Score: 910441.6 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ations/occasionalpapers/no-13/
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 – UNODA     Добро пожаловать в ООН العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru   Download PDF English Overview Occasional Paper No. 13 is the third in a series of publications produced by the Office for Disarmament Affairs compiling the rich set of presentations and power points made by participants in three regional seminars on implementing Security Council resolution 1540 (2004) that took place in 2006. Occasional Paper No. 11 deals with the seminar held in Beijing in March for Asia and the Pacific and Occasional Paper No. 12 with the seminar held in Accra, Ghana in November for the African region.
Language:English
Score: 910441.6 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ations/occasionalpapers/no-13/
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 – UNODA     Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru   Download PDF English Overview Occasional Paper No. 13 is the third in a series of publications produced by the Office for Disarmament Affairs compiling the rich set of presentations and power points made by participants in three regional seminars on implementing Security Council resolution 1540 (2004) that took place in 2006. Occasional Paper No. 11 deals with the seminar held in Beijing in March for Asia and the Pacific and Occasional Paper No. 12 with the seminar held in Accra, Ghana in November for the African region.
Language:English
Score: 910441.6 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ations/occasionalpapers/no-13/
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 – UNODA     Bienvenue aux Nations Unies العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 13, December 2007 United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru   Download PDF English Overview Occasional Paper No. 13 is the third in a series of publications produced by the Office for Disarmament Affairs compiling the rich set of presentations and power points made by participants in three regional seminars on implementing Security Council resolution 1540 (2004) that took place in 2006. Occasional Paper No. 11 deals with the seminar held in Beijing in March for Asia and the Pacific and Occasional Paper No. 12 with the seminar held in Accra, Ghana in November for the African region.
Language:English
Score: 910441.6 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ations/occasionalpapers/no-13/
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation Benefits and risks of flexible working arrangements: Findings from international research Gianni Rosas, ILO Senior Employment Specialist and Director for Italy and San Marino Flexible working arrangements and parental responsibilities sharing: New perspectives in Italy and Europe – Rome, 4-5 December 2017 This presentation • Definition of telework/ICT-mobile work (T/ICTM), scope and methodology of the study • Incidence and intensity of T/ICTM work • The effects of T/ICTM on working time, work-life balance, health and well-being and performance • Conclusions and policy implications Definition, scope and methodology DEFINITION: Telework/ICT-mobile work (T/ICTM) includes all work performed by workers using Information and Communications Technologies outside the employer’s premises WORKER CATEGORIES: (i) regular home-based teleworkers; (ii) T/ICTM high-mobile workers; (iii) occasional T/ICTM workers; and (iv) workers always at employer’s premises 15 COUNTRIES: (i) Europe: Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom; and other Regions: Argentina, Brazil, India, Japan and the United States METHODOLOGY: (i) joint ILO-EUROFOUND national questionnaires on incidence and effects of T/ICTM plus policy responses; and analysis of micro-data of European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS 2015) Incidence of T/ICTM work (1) 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Home based teleworker High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM Share of T/ICTM employees in 2015 (EU28) Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Incidence of T/ICTM Work (2) • Increase in T/ICTM in recent years, particularly in places other than home • T/ICTM more common among professionals and managers, but is also significant among clerical support and sales workers • In general men are more likely to perform T/ICTM than women, although the latter carry out more regular home-based telework than the former. • The typical T/ICTM worker is employed full time, high- skilled and works more from home than from other places Effects of T/ICTM: Working Time (1) The main findings of the national studies are that T/ICTM workers: • Work longer hours than average employees in the country • Experience more atypical work schedules (e.g. evenings, weekends) but also perform personal tasks during normal working hours • Have greater working-time autonomy/”time sovereignty” Effects of T/ICTM: Working Time (2) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Men Women Men Women Men Women Ment Women Always at employer premise Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM % o f e m p lo ye e s in t h e E U 2 8 Working hours in the main job 48 or more 41-47 35-40 21-34 20 or less Percentage of employees by type of T/ICTM, gender and working hours, EU28 Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Work-life balance (1) Most of the national studies report: • An overall positive effect of T/ICTM work on work-life balance • A “blurring of the boundaries” with more work-home and home-work interference • A better work–life balance for home-based teleworkers, while the ‘high-mobile’ workers face more negative outcomes. • A more positive balance for partial and occasional forms of T/ICTM than the higher frequency ones • Shorter hours of work and a slightly better work-life balance for women that men Effects of T/ICTM: Work-life balance (2) 10 10 63 62 47 38 29 27 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Always at employer premises Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM % o f e m p lo ye e s in t h e E U 2 8 Over the last 12 months, how often have you worked in your free time to meet work demands? (at least several times a month) Employees reporting working in their free time to meet work demands by type of T/ICTM and gender, EU28 (%) Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Work-life balance (3) 63 58 74 69 75 73 82 75 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Always at employer premises Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM % o f e m p lo ye e s in t h e E U 2 8 Arranging to take an hour or two off during working hours to take care of personal or family matters is very or fairly easy Employees reporting that it is very or fairly easy to take time off during working hours to take care of personal or family matters, by type of T/ICTM and gender, EU28 (%) Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Health and well-being (1) The national studies report: • Increased flexibility and autonomy, as well as work intensification and stress • Blurring boundaries and stress (in most EU national studies) • Commuting and related stress reduction (Brazil, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, UK, USA) • Isolation (Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Netherlands, UK) • Challenges relating to ergonomics (Finland, Spain, the Netherlands) – more research needed Effects of T/ICTM: Health and well-being (2) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM Always at employer's premises Yes, mainly positively Yes, mainly negatively Percentage of employees reporting that work affects their health (positively or negatively) by T/ICTM group, EU28 Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Health and well-being (3) Always at the employers premise, HIGH ICT Regular home-based teleworker, HIGH ICT High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM Always at the employers premise, LOW ICT Regular home-based teleworker, LOW ICT High mobile, LOW ICT Occasional mobile, LOW ICT 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 A u to n o m y Intensity Indices of autonomy and intensity in relation to working outside the employer’s premises and frequency of use of ICTs Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Performance The national studies identified the following effects of T/ICTM on performance: • A general positive effect also related to productivity increases due to technological innovation • Positive impact due to autonomy, work-life balance, motivation • Some performance drawbacks due to lack of ICT skills, managerial behaviour (especially “command and control”), lack of rest periods Conclusions • Growing incidence of T/ICTM work but substantial differences across countries, occupations, sectors and in terms of frequency for workers • Men are more likely to perform T/ICTM than women, but women perform more regular home-based telework • Longer, more “porous” working hours, including supplemental working hours, BUT reduced commuting time and more working time autonomy • Overall, better work-life balance but more work-home and home-work interference due to blurring of work-life boundaries • Women doing T/ICTM tend to work shorter hours than men and seem to achieve slightly better work–life balance • Greater work intensity but more working time autonomy appears to offset the greater intensity, except for “high mobile” T/ICTM workers • More stress for some T/ICTM workers, especially ICT-mobile workers • Lack of attention to ergonomics and the potential for isolation • Overall positive effects on individual performance/productivity • Partial (part-time) telework and occasional ICT-mobile work seem to produce the most positive balance in relation to the effects of T/ICTM work Some policy implications • Strengthen positive effects of T/ICTM and reduce negative ones (e.g. promoting partial or part-time work, while restricting informal/supplemental work and long hours for high-mobile) through legislation and collective agreements • Include T/ICTM work in policies for inclusive labour markets (e.g. older workers, workers with family and other responsibilities, persons with disabilities) • Introduce policy measures to tackle the negative effects on working conditions for those engaged in different types of T/ICTM work • Adjust working time regulations (e.g. address supplemental work and ensure respect of minimum rest periods) • Address major challenge of OSH prevention and application of legislation to T/ICTM (e.g. training for both employees and managers on risks and effective use of ICTs for remote work) Questions/comments Contact ILO Office for Italy and San Marino Via Panisperna, 28 – Rome Email: rome@ilo.org Web: www.ilo.org/rome www.lavorodignitoso.org Twitter: @LavoroDignitoso mailto:rome@ilo.org http://www.ilo.org/rome http://www.lavorodignitoso.org/
Language:English
Score: 905466.9 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...enericdocument/wcms_740086.pdf
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation Benefits and risks of flexible working arrangements: Findings from international research Gianni Rosas, ILO Senior Employment Specialist and Director for Italy and San Marino Flexible working arrangements and parental responsibilities sharing: New perspectives in Italy and Europe – Rome, 4-5 December 2017 This presentation • Definition of telework/ICT-mobile work (T/ICTM), scope and methodology of the study • Incidence and intensity of T/ICTM work • The effects of T/ICTM on working time, work-life balance, health and well-being and performance • Conclusions and policy implications Definition, scope and methodology DEFINITION: Telework/ICT-mobile work (T/ICTM) includes all work performed by workers using Information and Communications Technologies outside the employer’s premises WORKER CATEGORIES: (i) regular home-based teleworkers; (ii) T/ICTM high-mobile workers; (iii) occasional T/ICTM workers; and (iv) workers always at employer’s premises 15 COUNTRIES: (i) Europe: Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom; and other Regions: Argentina, Brazil, India, Japan and the United States METHODOLOGY: (i) joint ILO-EUROFOUND national questionnaires on incidence and effects of T/ICTM plus policy responses; and analysis of micro-data of European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS 2015) Incidence of T/ICTM work (1) 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Home based teleworker High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM Share of T/ICTM employees in 2015 (EU28) Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Incidence of T/ICTM Work (2) • Increase in T/ICTM in recent years, particularly in places other than home • T/ICTM more common among professionals and managers, but is also significant among clerical support and sales workers • In general men are more likely to perform T/ICTM than women, although the latter carry out more regular home-based telework than the former. • The typical T/ICTM worker is employed full time, high- skilled and works more from home than from other places Effects of T/ICTM: Working Time (1) The main findings of the national studies are that T/ICTM workers: • Work longer hours than average employees in the country • Experience more atypical work schedules (e.g. evenings, weekends) but also perform personal tasks during normal working hours • Have greater working-time autonomy/”time sovereignty” Effects of T/ICTM: Working Time (2) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Men Women Men Women Men Women Ment Women Always at employer premise Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM % o f e m p lo ye e s in t h e E U 2 8 Working hours in the main job 48 or more 41-47 35-40 21-34 20 or less Percentage of employees by type of T/ICTM, gender and working hours, EU28 Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Work-life balance (1) Most of the national studies report: • An overall positive effect of T/ICTM work on work-life balance • A “blurring of the boundaries” with more work-home and home-work interference • A better work–life balance for home-based teleworkers, while the ‘high-mobile’ workers face more negative outcomes. • A more positive balance for partial and occasional forms of T/ICTM than the higher frequency ones • Shorter hours of work and a slightly better work-life balance for women that men Effects of T/ICTM: Work-life balance (2) 10 10 63 62 47 38 29 27 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Always at employer premises Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM % o f e m p lo ye e s in t h e E U 2 8 Over the last 12 months, how often have you worked in your free time to meet work demands? (at least several times a month) Employees reporting working in their free time to meet work demands by type of T/ICTM and gender, EU28 (%) Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Work-life balance (3) 63 58 74 69 75 73 82 75 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Always at employer premises Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM % o f e m p lo ye e s in t h e E U 2 8 Arranging to take an hour or two off during working hours to take care of personal or family matters is very or fairly easy Employees reporting that it is very or fairly easy to take time off during working hours to take care of personal or family matters, by type of T/ICTM and gender, EU28 (%) Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Health and well-being (1) The national studies report: • Increased flexibility and autonomy, as well as work intensification and stress • Blurring boundaries and stress (in most EU national studies) • Commuting and related stress reduction (Brazil, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, UK, USA) • Isolation (Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Netherlands, UK) • Challenges relating to ergonomics (Finland, Spain, the Netherlands) – more research needed Effects of T/ICTM: Health and well-being (2) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Regular home-based telework High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM Always at employer's premises Yes, mainly positively Yes, mainly negatively Percentage of employees reporting that work affects their health (positively or negatively) by T/ICTM group, EU28 Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Health and well-being (3) Always at the employers premise, HIGH ICT Regular home-based teleworker, HIGH ICT High mobile T/ICTM Occasional T/ICTM Always at the employers premise, LOW ICT Regular home-based teleworker, LOW ICT High mobile, LOW ICT Occasional mobile, LOW ICT 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 A u to n o m y Intensity Indices of autonomy and intensity in relation to working outside the employer’s premises and frequency of use of ICTs Source: Elaboration data EWCS 2015 Effects of T/ICTM: Performance The national studies identified the following effects of T/ICTM on performance: • A general positive effect also related to productivity increases due to technological innovation • Positive impact due to autonomy, work-life balance, motivation • Some performance drawbacks due to lack of ICT skills, managerial behaviour (especially “command and control”), lack of rest periods Conclusions • Growing incidence of T/ICTM work but substantial differences across countries, occupations, sectors and in terms of frequency for workers • Men are more likely to perform T/ICTM than women, but women perform more regular home-based telework • Longer, more “porous” working hours, including supplemental working hours, BUT reduced commuting time and more working time autonomy • Overall, better work-life balance but more work-home and home-work interference due to blurring of work-life boundaries • Women doing T/ICTM tend to work shorter hours than men and seem to achieve slightly better work–life balance • Greater work intensity but more working time autonomy appears to offset the greater intensity, except for “high mobile” T/ICTM workers • More stress for some T/ICTM workers, especially ICT-mobile workers • Lack of attention to ergonomics and the potential for isolation • Overall positive effects on individual performance/productivity • Partial (part-time) telework and occasional ICT-mobile work seem to produce the most positive balance in relation to the effects of T/ICTM work Some policy implications • Strengthen positive effects of T/ICTM and reduce negative ones (e.g. promoting partial or part-time work, while restricting informal/supplemental work and long hours for high-mobile) through legislation and collective agreements • Include T/ICTM work in policies for inclusive labour markets (e.g. older workers, workers with family and other responsibilities, persons with disabilities) • Introduce policy measures to tackle the negative effects on working conditions for those engaged in different types of T/ICTM work • Adjust working time regulations (e.g. address supplemental work and ensure respect of minimum rest periods) • Address major challenge of OSH prevention and application of legislation to T/ICTM (e.g. training for both employees and managers on risks and effective use of ICTs for remote work) Questions/comments Contact ILO Office for Italy and San Marino Via Panisperna, 28 – Rome Email: rome@ilo.org Web: www.ilo.org/rome www.lavorodignitoso.org Twitter: @LavoroDignitoso mailto:rome@ilo.org http://www.ilo.org/rome http://www.lavorodignitoso.org/
Language:English
Score: 905466.9 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...enericdocument/wcms_740086.pdf
Data Source: un
Giornata mondiale per l’eliminazione del lavoro minorile 2021: Music for rights, concerto in occasione della Giornata mondiale per l’eliminazione del lavoro minorile Salta al contenuto principale International Labour Organization Promuovere la giustizia sociale e il lavoro dignitoso La OIL è un'agenzia specializzata delle Nazioni Unite English Cercare sul ilo.org Cercare sul ilo.org OIL-Roma Origine e mandato L’OIL e l’Italia Convenzioni ratificate L’OIL e San Marino Convenzioni ratificate Aree tematiche Norme internazionali del lavoro e documenti in italiano Link utili Contatti OIL-Roma Music for rights, concerto in occasione della Giornata mondiale per ... Giornata mondiale per l’eliminazione del lavoro minorile 2021 Music for rights, concerto in occasione della Giornata mondiale per l’eliminazione del lavoro minorile In occasione della Giornata mondiale per l’eliminazione del lavoro minorile del 12 giugno, SONG-Sistema in Lombardia e Rete delle scuole ad indirizzo musicale della città metropolitana di Milano (SMIM) Milano, in collaborazione con l’Ufficio per l’Italia e San Marino dell’Organizzazione Internazionale del Lavoro (OIL), organizzano il concerto Music for rights (la musica per i diritti).  (...) Per molti giovani studenti di musica di Milano, il concerto sarà la prima occasione per esibirsi nuovamente su un palcoscenico dal vivo.
Language:English
Score: 901610.7 - www.ilo.org/rome/eventi...WCMS_800073/lang--it/index.htm
Data Source: un