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The big cryptocurrency global brands include Bitcoin, Litecoin, XRP, Dash, Lisk and Monero, but Bitcoin leads the pack in Africa. (...) Industry experts believe that cryptocurrency will be around for years. That Bitcoin users can send money to just about anywhere there is an internet connection for relatively small fees and with no third-party interference is an advantage that standard government-issued currencies cannot offer.  (...) Countries such as Bangladesh, Ecuador and Kyrgyzstan believe the risks outweigh the gains and have banned Bitcoin as well as initial coin offerings or ICOs, which are used by start-ups to evade the demand for capital by banks and other financing institutions.  
Language:English
Score: 1916077 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...e-next-frontier-cryptocurrency
Data Source: un
HARNESSING BLOCKCHAIN FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES
Similar moments in past technological revolutions offered windows of opportunity for some developing countries to catch up and for others to forge ahead. (...) Through initial coin offerings, a team of developers sells tokens to finance the development of a solution. Usually, a share of the tokens is distributed to the development team and initial investors. After the bitcoin price bust in 2017, initial coin offerings were scrutinized by regulators in the United States of America, and some of the initial coin offerings were considered to breach securities regulations.21 23.
Language:English
Score: 1845106.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...?open&DS=E/CN.16/2021/3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
How is Blockchain Related to Bitcoin? Bitcoin was the first application of blockchain technology, thus people often inadvertently used “Bitcoin” to mean blockchain. (...) (iv) Electronic Voting Blockchain technology can offer a more bottom-up and participatory social structure by providing a cost effective and secure e-voting system. (...) (ii) Identity over Anonymity Bitcoin thrives due to anonymity. Anyone can look at the Bitcoin ledger and see every transaction that happened, but the account information is a meaningless sequence of numbers.
Language:English
Score: 1757047.3 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...17/10/15STM_Blockchain-101.pdf
Data Source: un
Several businesses around the world present accept Bitcoins as a means of final payment. Over the last 4 years the US dollar price of Bitcoin has grown exponentially. (...) Plassaras (2013) therefore argues that the Fund could either attempt to excise indirect control of the currency or it could offer the digital currency quasi-membership status. (...) The cryptographic algorithm that governs the production of new Bitcoin for sale becomes more difficult to solve every time a new Bitcoin is produced.
Language:English
Score: 1701516.4 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...yptocurrencies_be_included.pdf
Data Source: un
THE RECORDING OF CRYPTO ASSETS IN THE SYSTEM OF NATIONAL ACCOUNTS – AN UPDATE
The term Bitcoin- like crypto assets (BLCAs) is also sometimes used to label the latter types of crypto assets6. (...) They are usually issued via initial coin offerings (ICOs) or security token offering (STO)8. (...) The term ‘altcoin’ does not seem to work either, as it is referring to all cryptocurrencies ‘alternative to bitcoin’ and therefore would exclude the Bitcoin.
Language:English
Score: 1681358.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...DS=ECE/CES/GE.20/2020/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
First, an appropriately designed, blockchain-based settlement network would offer tools to improve surveillance of transactions. (...) Second, a blockchain-based network would offer Caribbean banks the opportunity to bypass correspondent banks altogether. (...) Thus, the primary use of Bitcoin today is as a speculative asset. Newer “alt-coin” currencies have offered different variations on blockchain-based transactions, but have been challenged to gain acceptance in the marketplace and many tend to be thinly traded.
Language:English
Score: 1653804.3 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...ased_settlement_frameworks.pdf
Data Source: un
But blockchains do present some opportunities… Blockchains can be used to… • Make monitoring easier A blockchain-based settlement network can offer tools to improve surveillance of transactions, which would enable better detection of illicit financial transfers and thereby decrease risk and associated compliance costs. • Cut out the middleman A blockchain-based network may eventually offer Caribbean banks the opportunity to bypass correspondent banks altogether. Blockchain-based options for bank clearance and settlement 1) The Open Model Use Bitcoin or another commodity-like digital currency – either directly, or by building on top of their public blockchain 2) The Permissioned Model Use blockchains operated by a restricted consortium of banks and other institutions 3) The Centralized Model Central Bank-issued Digital Currencies (CBDCs) Open blockchains • Bitcoin, Ethereum, DASH…… this is where innovation comes from. • But its also the Wild West. • Pseudonymous ≠ Private Permissioned blockchains • Restricted to a limited set of participating institutions – So how is governance to be managed?
Language:English
Score: 1639301.2 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...frameworks-robert_williams.pdf
Data Source: un
The consultant, in offering his professional opinion, suggested that this rejection was overly broad, and might have been made in haste. (...) The consultant described this as a case where, possibly due to a lack of awareness of the technology, popular sentiment turned against the idea of accepting a widespread distribution of small amounts of free Bitcoin to everyone in the country. The organizers of the event had come into Dominica without an understanding of the landscape or a sense of how their service offering would be viewed, and they experienced pushback from the population. (...) They opened a period for comments and after significant issues were raised, they offered a 2.0 version of the BitLicense proposal.
Language:English
Score: 1625430.5 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...eting_report_12_march_2015.pdf
Data Source: un
The consultant, in offering his professional opinion, suggested that this rejection was overly broad, and might have been made in haste. (...) The consultant described this as a case where, possibly due to a lack of awareness of the technology, popular sentiment turned against the idea of accepting a widespread distribution of small amounts of free Bitcoin to everyone in the country. The organizers of the event had come into Dominica without an understanding of the landscape or a sense of how their service offering would be viewed, and they experienced pushback from the population. (...) They opened a period for comments and after significant issues were raised, they offered a 2.0 version of the BitLicense proposal.
Language:English
Score: 1625430.5 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...iles/events/files/lcarl461.pdf
Data Source: un
Crypto token launches in Miami to generate city revenue - ITU Hub This website will offer limited functionality in this browser. We only support the recent versions of major browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. (...) Muneeb Ali, Founder of the Stacks protocol, said: “Cities can embrace Bitcoin and crypto faster than nations – big cities with billion-dollar budgets can start to operate more like the private sector by diversifying their cash balances into Bitcoin. (...) You’ll notice some changes… We have moved ITU News, ITU Members’ zone, Join ITU and Publications to a new online home that offers an improved experience for our growing community.
Language:English
Score: 1612187.3 - https://www.itu.int/hub/2021/0...iami-to-generate-city-revenue/
Data Source: un