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The Recommendations for the Online Gaming Industry on Assessing Impact on Children – compiled with extensive inputs from the industry – highlight some of the key child rights considerations for online gaming companies of all kinds, from game developers, publishers, distributors, platforms, esports companies and streaming services. They build on a  UNICEF Discussion Paper on Online Gaming and Child Rights  published in 2019 and extensive engagement with the online gaming community. (...) "We welcome the UNICEF guidance document helping industry associations, formal and non-formal educational institutions and game developer studios and publisher to mainstream child right considerations." – Jari-Pekka Kaleva, COO of the European Games Developer Federation These recommendations aim to guide the online gaming industry on embedding child rights within internal processes with a goal of providing the best possible experience for all children looking to enjoy gaming online.
Language:English
Score: 1394366.7 - https://www.unicef.org/partner...stry-assessing-impact-children
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Recommendations for the Online Gaming Industry Assessing the impacts of the online gaming industry on children UNICEF Armenia/Anush Babajanyan VII Highlights To explore both positive and potentially negative aspects of children’s online gaming, UNICEF Innocenti and UNICEF Child. Rights and Business unit published a Discussion Paper on Child Rights and Online Gaming in August 2019. This paper is a part of a series of similar papers tackling child rights issues within the digital sector. While preparing this paper and after its publication, UNICEF has engaged extensively with the online gaming industry in order to better understand and confirm the risks and opportunities for child rights; to identify best practices and leaders; and ultimately to be able to offer the online gaming sector a rights-based framework to understand and manage its impacts on children.
Language:English
Score: 1380116.8 - https://www.unicef.org/armenia...dations-online-gaming-industry
Data Source: un
Representatives of more than 100 educational institutions and youth organisations all over the Republic attended the online Conference ‘Educational Games for Everyone’, dedicated to the International Children’s Day. (...) Under the hat of Guguta]. The championship games take place online and attracted over 150 teams from all over the country. (...) ‘Thanks to the Project all those interested will be able to organise and conduct educational games in teams, both online and traditionally – offline.
Language:English
Score: 1374441.6 - https://www.unicef.org/moldova...-non-formal-education-republic
Data Source: un
Thank you for the opportunity to brief you on the crucial issue of online gaming, radicalization, and extremism. I represent the Extremism and Gaming Research Network (EGRN), which brings together over 50 world-leading counter-extremism organizations and researchers including RUSI, ISD, Moonshot, GIFCT, UNDP, and M&C Saatchi World Services, to develop insights and solutions for the exploitation of online gaming by violent extremist organizations. b. (...) COVID-19 has led to a surge in online gaming and has become a lifeline during isolation. (...) Examine the correlation between online gaming and offline behavior. iv. Look at specific forms of in-game hate speech and radicalization, especially for non-English speaking audiences. v.
Language:English
Score: 1358687.9 - https://www.un.org/securitycou...alking_points_23_mar_22_v3.pdf
Data Source: un
COVID-19 caused an explosion in online gaming among all age groups, pointing out that gaming has become a central element of entertainment in the 21st century, and one of the fastest growing industries in the world. (...) However, as with other online activities in which children participate, negative experiences can also be experienced during gaming. (...) The conference will present the first national research on the impact of the gaming industry on children conducted by UNICEF through its U-Report platform, based on the Recommendations for the online gaming industry on assessing impact on children .
Language:English
Score: 1356784 - https://www.unicef.org/serbia/...esponsible-gaming-and-children
Data Source: un
Co-view and co-play with your child online. This will help you better understand what they are doing and why they enjoy an app, game or website, as well as providing a great opportunity to start conversations about online safety. 3. (...) For a healthy balance, encourage offline as well as online games and activities, such as home exercise, playing board games, drawing and reading books. If your child is online gaming, it is important to be aware of risks, including: • spending too much time gaming, which can have negative impacts on your child’s health, ability to study, and social and emotional wellbeing • cyberbullying and grooming through online or in-game chat • games with gambling-like elements which can normalise gambling for young people • costs of in-game spending.
Language:English
Score: 1355972.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/C...0the%20COVID-19%20pandemic.pdf
Data Source: un
Although some major sporting events were regrettably postponed (such as the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games), many people have still been able to follow their sporting passion, as league or cup sports play out in empty stadiums, but to massive online and TV followings much bigger than ever before. In this pandemic, others have turned to online gaming as a means of staying in touch with friends. Early on in the pandemic, we heard sensationalist reports about how Fortnite was ‘breaking the Internet’ in Italy, as young people turned to online games for amusement and entertainment, but also – vitally – to stay in touch with friends, as restrictions on physical contact were introduced.
Language:English
Score: 1351035.2 - https://www.itu.int/en/osg/dsg...speeches/Pages/2020-08-03.aspx
Data Source: un
Dialogica includes instructions for conducting educational games and 17 ready-made games on Sustainable Development Goals, as well as a separate ‘Stop Bullying’ game. (...) Important: children with special needs can also participate in edutainment activities. An educational game can be conducted as: a school lesson (30-45 minutes) a component part of your event program (20-60 minutes) a stand-alone event (90-180 minutes) an online event (30-90 minutes) Ассоциация интеллектуальных игр Республики Молдова Dinu Putere, a youth leader from Abaclia village, Basarabeasca district: ‘I participated in online trainings on the use of the Guide, and as part of my homework I conducted a game for young people in Abaclia. (...) Conducting an educational game Everything you need to know Have a look Find out more Press release 27 October 2020 More than 200 teams participated in an educational online game celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations.
Language:English
Score: 1348439.6 - https://www.unicef.org/moldova...-educational-games-adolescents
Data Source: un
It is a booming industry and an ever-expanding community. Video games bring people together online across national borders, languages, gender, ethnicity, and age. The sheer scale and exponential development of video games is an indication of the potential and reach that these games hold. (...) Al-Qaida and Daesh for instance developed video games adapted from popular first-person shooter games.
Language:English
Score: 1346311.3 - https://www.un.org/counterterr...ert-roundtable-video-games.pdf
Data Source: un
Check your privacy settings or ask a trusted/knowledgeable adult or friend for help and always log out when using a public computer. Online gaming can be fun and exciting but irresponsible and excessive gaming practices can lead to risks and bullying while gaming Sitting for hours in front of the computer amounts to an unhealthy lifestyle. (...) It is more important than just playing online games. Do’s Don’t Fun, enjoyment and the thrill of playing games should not become an addiction. (...) Nobody should pressure you into playing games that you are not comfortable with. Do’s Don’t Connecting with strangers and sharing personal details makes you vulnerable to online abuse and harassment.
Language:English
Score: 1344341.8 - https://www.unicef.org/india/media/2251/file
Data Source: un