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Although some major sporting events were regrettably postponed (such as the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games), many people have still been able to follow their sporting passion, as league or cup sports play out in empty stadiums, but to massive online and TV followings much bigger than ever before. In this pandemic, others have turned to online gaming as a means of staying in touch with friends. Early on in the pandemic, we heard sensationalist reports about how Fortnite was ‘breaking the Internet’ in Italy, as young people turned to online games for amusement and entertainment, but also – vitally – to stay in touch with friends, as restrictions on physical contact were introduced.
Language:English
Score: 1203242.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/osg/dsg...speeches/Pages/2020-08-03.aspx
Data Source: un
It is a booming industry and an ever-expanding community. Video games bring people together online across national borders, languages, gender, ethnicity, and age. The sheer scale and exponential development of video games is an indication of the potential and reach that these games hold. (...) Al-Qaida and Daesh for instance developed video games adapted from popular first-person shooter games.
Language:English
Score: 1200604.1 - https://www.un.org/counterterr...ert-roundtable-video-games.pdf
Data Source: un
Check your privacy settings or ask a trusted/knowledgeable adult or friend for help and always log out when using a public computer. Online gaming can be fun and exciting but irresponsible and excessive gaming practices can lead to risks and bullying while gaming Sitting for hours in front of the computer amounts to an unhealthy lifestyle. (...) It is more important than just playing online games. Do’s Don’t Fun, enjoyment and the thrill of playing games should not become an addiction. (...) Nobody should pressure you into playing games that you are not comfortable with. Do’s Don’t Connecting with strangers and sharing personal details makes you vulnerable to online abuse and harassment.
Language:English
Score: 1197695.1 - https://www.unicef.org/india/media/2251/file
Data Source: un
More than 200 teams participated in an educational online game celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations. (...) About 230 teams played an online educational game dedicated to the 75th anniversary of the United Nations. (...) This Guide will facilitate such games in both online and offline formats. It is also accompanied by 70 quizzes on the Sustainable Development Goals and Stop Bullying, which will help to engage adolescents in dialogue on topics such as Quality Education, Eradication of Poverty, Zero Hunger, Climate Actions and others.
Language:English
Score: 1196424.2 - https://www.unicef.org/moldova...e-celebrating-75th-anniversary
Data Source: un
INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION COUNCIL WORKING GROUP ON CHILD ONLINE PROTECTION Document : WG-CP-2/11 Date : 10 June 2010 English only 2nd meeting – Geneva, 11 June 2010 Portugal comments The Source of Online Threats to Youth and Children As requested at the first meeting of the Council Working Group on Child Online Protection (hereinafter referred as “CWG-CP”) in March 2010, this report provides the sources of threats to address cyberthreats and protect children online. (...) Online technologies in this report covers a number of areas including, importantly, access to the internet via fixed networks as well as online content and services accessed via mobile phones, game consoles and other new devices. (...) Conduct · Facilitation and promotion of risky sexual interactions between children themselves, including encouraging them to take and post pictures of themselves or others ( sexting ) which, aside from being harmful, may also be illegal. · Normal sexual development and experimentation online can sometimes result in the inadvertent production and distribution of CAM, exposing the child and his or her friends to possible legal ramifications. · Ease with which children may place information about themselves in the public domain, or post pictures, videos or text which might compromise their personal safety or jeopardize a number of career options in the future. · Online solicitations, including sexual solicitation · Internet-initiated offline (sexual) meeting/ relationship · Statutory sex crime or kidnapping (offline) · Online (sexual) harassment · Sexual abuse · Disclosure of personal information · Post or transmission of self-created images, text, or video · Exposure to bullying and allowing or promoting an environment in which children and young people are encouraged to bully others. · Cyberbullying (offenders/victims) · Online harassment · Threaten, embarrass, or humiliate youth and children · Physical/psychological assault, depression or substance abuse · Enticement to commit illegal activities without awareness and acknowledgement. · Internet-initiated crimes · Infringing intellectual property rights over copyright protected files (illegal downloads/file-share) · Piracy of software, music or movies, e-books, etc. · Defamation crimes · Hacking, distributing spyware and viruses Commerce · Enable to access to or acquisition of age inappropriate goods and services, which they could not typically purchase in person from a shop. · Exposure to scams, identity thefts, fraud and similar threats which are economic in nature or are rooted in inadequate data protection or privacy laws. · Selling/bposure uying illegal products, such as drugs, weapons, etc. · Selling/buying sexual activities · Unauthorized payment (stealing parent’s credit card) · Advertising products prohibited to youth and children · Advertising without limitations on time and content Excessive use · Facilitation or promotion of obsessive behaviour or excessive use which may have deleterious effects on children’s and young people’s health or social skills, or both. · Games and gaming over the Internet often feature in this type of online behaviour which in some countries is referred to as a form of addiction . · Internet/online game addictions · Unauthorized payment for buying online game money · Buying and selling of unauthorized game items or money · Isolation from the real world · Omitting to eat or sleep resulting in physical harm to themselves · Contact with harmful content in online games · Excessive cost (high usage charges) Societal activities · Creation of a new digital divide among youth and children, both in terms of those who have ready and convenient access to it at home, school and elsewhere, and those who do not; and between those who are confident and proficient users of it and those who are not.
Language:English
Score: 1184129 - https://www.itu.int/council/gr...hreats_Portugal%20comments.doc
Data Source: un
Games and gaming have evolved from dedicated, single-game units to massively multiplayer online role-player games with millions of players. (...) Massively multiplayer online (role-playing) games: MMOGs and MMORPGs Massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) are video games capable of supporting hundreds or thou- sands of players simultaneously in one or several persistent worlds. (...) People began playing casual games online from the early days of the Internet.
Language:English
Score: 1180637.4 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../23/01/T23010000140002PDFE.pdf
Data Source: un
Online games encourage players to stay mentally and physically healthy at home Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) In order to help inspire millions of online gamers to lead an active lifestyle and look after their mental health, WHO has encouraged online gaming companies to invite their users to take WHO’s #HealthyAtHome challenge. (...) “We welcome efforts by the online gaming companies, such as Playrix, to encourage their large online communities to take the necessary steps for better health and well-being,” said Andy Pattison, Team Lead of Digital Channels at the World Health Organization.
Language:English
Score: 1179960.3 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...and-physically-healthy-at-home
Data Source: un
THE NEW INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AND WOMEN: ESSENTIAL REFLECTIONS
Seductions and alienation in video games. The first steps in technological education .................. 21 V. (...) Obviously, this depends on the games being accompanied by some form of activity or stimulus to encourage such reflection. (...) A fascinating initiative in this connection is the Turing Game, a game created by the Georgia Institute of Technology for understanding identity issues online.
Language:English
Score: 1179025.8 - HTTP://DACCESS-ODS.UN.ORG/ACCE...GET?OPEN&DS=LC/L.1742-P&LANG=E
Data Source: ods
But for parents who worried about the time their children spend on social media and online games  before  the pandemic, the figurative ‘jump’ into screens can also cause more concern or even distress. (...) These include talking to children about their online experiences; making sure they do not play games intended for an older audience; and observing their general mood and happiness as they play. (...) With restricted outdoor movement, the WHO has recommended  active video games and online exercise classes  as a way to stay healthy at home.
Language:English
Score: 1178716.8 - https://www.unicef.org/bulgari...king-screen-time-time-covid-19
Data Source: un
ISSUES THAT THE SECRETARIAT WOULD LIKE TO BRING TO THE ATTENTION OF THE PARTIES
The launches were widely publicized, including by mainstream and gaming media outlets and children’s media and websites. The animation and the game featured in more than 600 articles covering 32 countries. The animation has already been watched more than 1 million times, and the game has been downloaded more than 37,000 times for iOS and Android mobile phone use.
Language:English
Score: 1178094.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...P/OZL.PRO.WG.1/43/INF/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods