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STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF RELEVANT CONFERENCE RESOLUTIONS : BACKGROUND PAPER PREPARED BY THE SECRETARIAT
An up -to-date list is available to competent authorities and government agencies through an online directory.2 2. Support for anti-corruption agencies 16. (...) In November 2019, the guide entitled Reporting Mechanisms in Sport, developed in partnership with the International Olympic Committee, was launched in Switzerland. 38. (...) The Office also facilitated a side event on safeguarding sport from corruption during the eighth session.
Language:English
Score: 953237.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...DS=CAC/COSP/WG.4/2020/3&Lang=E
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Sport day - Events | United Nations Skip to main content Toggle navigation Welcome to the United Nations العربية 中文 English Français हिन्दी Português Русский Español Kiswahili International Day of Sport for Development and Peace 6 April Search the United Nations Submit Search A-Z Site Index Toggle navigation Home Background Message Events Resources UN Observances Members of the Brazilian battalion of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) play tug of war with a group of local children during a civic day event in Cité Soleil, Haiti. UN Photo/Logan Abassi Events The International Day of Sport for Development and Peace 2021 will be marked through online and social media activity in the lead up to and on the Day, Tuesday, 6 April. The Department of Global Communications , in collaboration with DESA , WHO and the co- chairs of the Group of Friends of Sport for Sustainable Development in New York - Qatar and Monaco - will coordinate social media and online messaging around the theme of recovery from the pandemic, the importance of equity in that recovery, and what is necessary to build back better for a more resilient and equitable world.
Language:English
Score: 953152.9 - https://www.un.org/en/observances/sport-day/events
Data Source: un
STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF CONFERENCE RESOLUTIONS 9/3 AND 9/6, ON THE PREVENTION OF CORRUPTION
In December 2021, in cooperation with the Youth Department of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of Tuvalu, UNODC organized a webinar to promote youth integrity through sport. 65. (...) Also in November, UNODC and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) published Legal Approaches to Tackling the Manipulation of Sports Competitions: Resource Guide. A study entitled Tackling Bribery in Sport: An Overview of Relevant Laws and Standards was launched by Task Force 4 of the International Partnership against Corruption in Sport, which is co-chaired by UNODC and IOC. On International Anti-Corruption Day, the UNODC Global Report on Corruption in Sport was launched, highlighting for the first time the global scale of corruption in sport. 71.
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Score: 953105.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...DS=CAC/COSP/WG.4/2022/4&Lang=E
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PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM BULLYING : REVISED DRAFT RESOLUTION / BRAZIL, CANADA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, COSTA RICA, CROATIA, DENMARK, ECUADOR, HONDURAS, LESOTHO, MEXICO, PARAGUAY AND THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND
A/C.3/73/L.25/Rev.1 18-19013 2/5 underscoring the importance of its implementation for ensuring the enjoyment of the rights of the child, Recognizing that the thirtieth anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the review by the high-level political forum on sustainable development of Goals 4 and 16, as well as the first global review by the General Assembly of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in 2019, each present strategic opportunities to reinforce action and accelerate progress towards the prevention and elimination of bullying and of all forms of violence against children, Welcoming the submission of the information on national implementation efforts for the report of the Secretary-General,6 and taking note of the report, as well as of the conclusions and recommendations contained therein, Recognizing the importance of international, regional and bilateral multi-stakeholder partnerships and initiatives to advance the effective protection and promotion of the rights of the child and the elimination of violence against children, including all forms of bullying, and in this regard noting with appreciation the efforts of, inter alia, the Global Partnership to End Violence against Children and the WeProtect Global Alliance, Noting the organization of expert consultations at the regional level, promoted by Member States, in order to raise awareness of the impact of bullying on the rights of the child and to share experiences and best practices, as outlined in the report of the Secretary-General, Welcoming the development of national and subnational action plans and awareness-raising campaigns and the enactment of legislation by several Member States to prevent and respond to school violence and bullying, including cyberbullying, Recognizing that bullying, including cyberbullying, can take both direct and indirect forms, from acts of physical, verbal, sexual and relational violence or aggression to social exclusion, including from peer to peer, which can inflict physical, psychological and social harm, and that, although rates differ from country to country, bullying, online or in person has a negative impact on the fulfilment of the rights of the child and is among children’s main concerns, affecting a high percentage of children and compromising their health, emotional well-being and academic work, and acknowledging the need to prevent and eliminate bullying among children, Recognizing also the importance of generating appropriate statistical information and data on bullying, disaggregated by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migration status, disability and geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts, Concerned about the occurrence of bullying in all parts of the world and the fact that children who are victimized by such practices may be at heightened risk of compromising their health, emotional well-being and academic work and for a wide range of emotional and/or physical problems, as well as potential long-term effects on the individual’s ability to realize his or her own potential, Concerned also that bullying is associated with long-lasting consequences that continue on into adulthood, Noting with concern that children who are marginalized or vulnerable, who face stigmatization, discrimination or exclusion, are disproportiona tely affected by bullying, both in person and online, __________________ 6 A/73/265. A/C.3/73/L.25/Rev.1 3/5 18-19013 Recognizing that bullying often includes a gender dimension and is associated with gender-based violence and stereotyping that negatively affects both boys and girls, Noting the risks associated with the use of new information and communications technologies and applications, including increased vulnerability to bullying, while stressing that they can create new ways to enhance education and, inter alia, foster learning and teaching on the rights of the child and can be useful tools to promote children’s protection, including with appropriate guidance from parents and legal guardians, with the best interests of the child as a primary consideration, Noting also the role that information and communications technologies play in reducing the risk of sexual exploitation and abuse, including by empowering children to report such abuses, Recalling the obligations of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of the Child to ensure that parents or, as the case may be, legal guardians, have the primary responsibility for the upbringing and development of the child as well as to take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child, and recognizing that the child, for the full and harmonious development of his or her personality, should grow up in a family environment, in an atmosphere of happiness, love and understanding, Acknowledging the distinct and important roles that parents, legal guardians, schools, civil society, sports associations, communities, State institutions and traditional and non-traditional media each play in securing children’s protection from the risks associated with bullying, including cyberbullying, and in preventing all forms of violence, including by promoting children’s online safety, Recognizing that early childhood is a critical stage for cognitive, emotional and behavioural development and that the parent-child relationship is a significant factor in predicting bullying behaviour in adolescents, as well as the existing evidence of a link between domestic violence and bullying in schools, Emphasizing that evidence-based initiatives to strengthen children’s life skills and respect for human rights, tolerance, concern for others and the responsibility to foster safety, as well as whole-school and whole-community programmes that fully respect all human rights and help to prevent and address bullying, constitute best practices that should be developed, strengthened and shared through international cooperation, Acknowledging that children are uniquely placed to inform effective solutions and responses to bullying, underlining that children’s participation and their contributions, including their views and recommendations, therefore need to be at the centre of efforts to prevent and address bullying and that their effective and meaningful participation is critical to a clear understanding of bullying and its impacts, 1. Calls upon Member States: (a) To continue to take all appropriate measures to prevent and protect children, including in school, from any form of violence, including forms of bullying, by promptly responding to such acts, and to provide appropriate support to children affected by and involved in bullying; A/C.3/73/L.25/Rev.1 18-19013 4/5 (b) To continue to promote and invest in education, including as a long-term and lifelong process by which everyone learns tolerance and respect for the dignity of others and the means and methods of ensuring such respect in all societies; (c) To address, through necessary measures, the wider economic and social inequalities that may contribute to bullying, including, poverty, gender norms and stereotypes, taking into account that risk factors are mixed and vary depending on country and context; (d) To develop and implement, as appropriate, measures and restorative practices to repair harm, restore relationships, avoid recidivism, promote the accountability of perpetrators and change aggressive behaviour; (e) To generate and analyse statistical information and data disaggregated by sex, age and other characteristics relevant in national contexts, and to provide information on disability, with regard to the problem of bullying, as a basis on which to elaborate effective public policies; (f) To adopt and strengthen, as appropriate, clear and comprehensive measures, including, where relevant, legislation, that seek to prevent and protect children from bullying, including cyberbullying, and provide for safe and child - sensitive counselling and reporting procedures and safeguards for the rights of affected children; (g) To strengthen the capacities of schools and the skills of professionals working with children in early detection and response to prevent and respond to bullying, including cyberbullying, in particular initiatives to mobilize support to prevent and address this phenomenon, and to ensure that children are informed of any existing public policies to secure their protection; (h) To continue to raise public awareness, involving family members, legal guardians, caregivers, young people, schools, formal and non-formal education settings, communities, community leaders, the media, sports organizations, athletes, parents and coaches, as well as civil society organizations, with the participation of children, regarding the protection of children from bullying; (i) To develop parenting and other skills programmes for parents, legal guardians and family members, together with social protection interventions that help to promote a nurturing family environment, reduce the risk of social exclusion and deprivation, prevent family stress and tackle negative social norms that contribute to violence against children and bullying; (j) To involve and provide children with the opportunity to participate effectively in the development of initiatives to prevent and address bullying, including available support services and safe, accessible, age- and child-sensitive, confidential and independent counselling and reporting mechanisms, guide them in promoting inclusive and responsible digital behaviour and inform them of available mental and physical health-care services and procedures in place to support them, where they exist, and encourages Member States to make such support services available, as much as possible; (k) To pay particular attention to children in vulnerable situations, including through efforts to promote mutual respect and tolerance for diversity in order to overcome stigmatization, discrimination or exclusion; (l) To continue to share national experiences and best practices for preventing and tackling bullying, including cyberbullying; 2.
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Score: 951667.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...&DS=A/C.3/73/L.25/REV.1&Lang=E
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LETTER DATED 16 APRIL 2019 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
The threat remains of international terrorist organizations increasing their indoctrination of the public for the purposes of radicalization, including online Supporters of international terrorist organizations have now established a single global system of online resources which are focused on providing religious and ideological training to future members of the extremist and terrorist underground. The global network includes online resources for virtually all operational international terrorist organizations, whose terrorist and extremist materials are published in more than 40 world languages. (...) In particular, ISIL online forums are used to discuss ways to avoid detection at border crossings and which routes are unlikely to give rise to suspicion, including through States that do not have adequate controls at their borders.
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Score: 951286.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/73/839&Lang=E
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INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR OPERATORS OF PLEASURE CRAFT
GE.17-20031(E)  ECE/TRANS/SC.3/147/Rev.4/Amend.1 ECONOMIC COMMISSION FOR EUROPE INLAND TRANSPORT COMMITTEE Working Party on Inland Water Transport International Certificate for Operators of Pleasure Craft Resolution No. 40 Revision 4 Amendment 1 UNITED NATIONS New York and Geneva, 2017 ECE/TRANS/SC.3/147/Rev.4/Amend.1 2 Amendments to Resolution No. 40, International Certificate for Operators of Pleasure Craft Resolution No. 89 (adopted by the Working Party on Inland Water Transport on 6 October 2017) The Working Party on Inland Water Transport, Considering Resolution No. 40 of the Working Party on Inland Water Transport concerning the International Certificate for Operators of Pleasure Craft (ICC), as amended by its resolutions Nos. 71 and 83 (ECE/TRANS/SC.3/147/Rev.4), Taking into account the development of the online database of ICC specimens and the latest changes concerning the issuance of ICCs, Bearing in mind the report of the Working Party on the Standardization of Technical and Safety Requirements in Inland Navigation on its fifty-first session (ECE/TRANS/SC.3/WP.3/102, paragraphs 80-84), Decides to amend the text of Resolution No. 40 and Annex IV as contained in the annex to this resolution, Requests Governments to inform the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe whether they accept this resolution, Requests the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe to place the question of the application of this resolution periodically on the agenda of the Working Party on Inland Water Transport. (...) No. 40 (acceptance) Yes/No Competent authority for authorization of ICC’s Approved body(ies) for issuing of ICC’s Germany Yes Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (Bundesministerium für Verkehr und digitale Infrastruktur) German Motor Yachting Association (Deutscher Motoryachtverband e.V.), Vinckeufer 12-14, D-47119 Duisburg; German Sailing Association (Deutscher Segler-Verband e.V.), Gründgensstr. 18, D-22309 Hamburg Netherlands Yes Stichting VAMEX Stichting VAMEX; Netherlands Royal Tourism Federation (Koninklijke Nederlandse Toeristenbond) (ANWB); Koninklijke Nederlandse Watersport Verbond (Netherlands Royal Water Sports Federation) (KNWV); Netherlands Royal Power-Boat Federation (Koninklijke Nederlandse Motorboot Club) (KNMC); Netherlands Water-Ski Federation (Nederlandse Waterskibond) (NWB) Poland Yes National Physical Culture and Sports Committee National Physical Culture and Sports Committee Serbia Yes The Ministry of Construction, Transport and Infrastructure of the Republic of Serbia The Harbour Master Office, Belgrade Slovakia Yes Transport Authority (Dopravný úrad) Transport Authority, Inland Navigation Department (Letisko M.
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Score: 950395.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../SC.3/147/REV.4/AMEND.1&Lang=E
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In Guinea, sport creates a level field for children with disabilities | UN DESA | United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Skip to Content Welcome to the United Nations Toggle navigation عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Department of Economic and Social Affairs Search UN DESA Home About UN DESA Who we are What we do Leadership DESA Divisions Advisory Board Global Online Policy Dialogue Series ECESA Conferences & Summits Organigramme Key Issues Intergovernmental Support SDG Knowledge Population Dynamics Public Institutions Sustainable Financing Social Inclusion Statistics Economic Analysis Forests News UN DESA Voice Publications Publications Working Papers Policy Briefs Multimedia Library Videos Infographics Calendar Contact Us COVID-19 Webinars Home About UN DESA Who we are What we do Leadership DESA Divisions Advisory Board Global Online Policy Dialogue Series ECESA Conferences & Summits Organigramme Key Issues Intergovernmental Support SDG Knowledge Population Dynamics Public Institutions Sustainable Financing Social Inclusion Statistics Economic Analysis Forests News UN DESA Voice Publications Publications Working Papers Policy Briefs Multimedia Library Videos Infographics Calendar Contact Us COVID-19 Webinars Home News In Guinea, sport creates a level field for children with disabilities News In Guinea, sport creates a level field for children with disabilities 15 July 2019 , New York Nearly one in every seven people in the world today – over a billion people – live with some kind of disability. (...) “It is about developing sport, fitness, recreational programmes around the world to inclusivize sport,” said Ann O’Connor, international development and research expert at UNESCO Chair. “That means, to get the people with and without disabilities playing sport, having fun and getting active.” Plan2Inclusivize empowers community volunteers and educators to practice inclusion of children with disabilities in sports and physical activities.
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Score: 949576 - https://www.un.org/development...hildren-with-disabilities.html
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DRAFT REPORT : OPEN-ENDED INTERGOVERNMENTAL WORKING GROUP ON THE PREVENTION OF CORRUPTION10TH SESSION : VIENNA, 4–6 SEPTEMBER 2019
The panellist from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) noted the activities IOC had undertaken to address corruption in sport. She underlined that in order for sport to serve as an effective vehicle to promote peace and social inclusion, it must be credible and free of corruption. She emphasized the special status of sports organizations that often involved complex public/private relations. (...) She further elaborated how IOC contributed to strengthening good governance in the national sports federations. She further informed the Group of IOC’s actions taken in order to support integrity in sport and to prevent manipulation in sports competitions, specifically underlining the joint initiatives with UNODC, such as the recent publication on Reporting Mechanisms in Sport: Practical Guide for Development and Implementation, and the establishment and operation of the International Partnership against Corruption in Sport. 20.
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Score: 949273.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...OSP/WG.4/2019/L.1/ADD.1&Lang=E
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LIST OF ISSUES AND QUESTIONS IN RELATION TO THE COMBINED SEVENTH AND EIGHTH PERIODIC REPORTS OF SPAIN
In 2014, the amount collected increased slightly. 6. In the area of sports, the High Council of Sports has made efforts to promote women’s sports, increasing the budget for programmes on women and sports. 2 In 2015, 1,302,530 euros were allocated for this purpose. (...) In order to eliminate stereotypes in the field of sports, the High Council of Sports is implementing a robust policy to increase the visibility of women’s sports. (...) A description of its work is available online.22 95. Women are still underrepresented at
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Score: 948340.4 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...CEDAW/C/ESP/Q/7-8/ADD.1&Lang=E
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UNESCO is the United Nations’ lead agency for Physical Education and Sport (PES). Why sport? Sport has historically played an important role in all societies, be it in the form of competitive sport, physical activity or play. But one may wonder: what does sport have to do with the United Nations? In fact, sport presents a natural partnership for the United Nations (UN) system, including UNESCO: sport and play are human rights that must be respected and enforced worldwide; sport has been increasingly recognized and used as a low-cost and high-impact tool in humanitarian, development and peace-building efforts, not only by the UN system but also by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), governments, development agencies, sports federations, armed forces and the media. (...) Report on the fight against discrimination and racism in football International Charter of Physical Education, Physical Activity and Sport Quality Physical Education   Message from the Director-General Resources All UNESCO Commemorations News 29 September 2020 African Youth Promoting Values of Sports during the COVID-19 Pandemic 18 June 2020 Any time is Sports Time: Online Campaign in Response to COVID-19 crisis 27 April 2020 Youth and Sport Webinar for Africa   1 of 2 next › all UNESCO applies a zero tolerance policy against all forms of harassment   WWW.UNESCO.ORG Disclaimer of use Access to Information Policy Privacy Policy UNESCO Name & Logo FAQ Environmental and Social Policies Protection of human rights : Procedure 104 Transparency Portal Scam alert Report fraud, abuse, misconduct © UNESCO 2021
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Score: 947172.5 - https://en.unesco.org/commemorations/sportpeaceday/2018
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