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These techniques are (but not limited to) a) defining of the internal and the external context where the role and the influence of the organization and relevant stakeholders are analyzed in the area of road-traffic safety, and b) the concept of Traffic Safety Performance Indicators which enables the organization to understand the process that leads to accidents/injuries and thereby facilitates the definition of the road-traffic safety objectives and targets. (...) An open system also means there are difficulties when identifying the interfaces between organizations involved in road-traffic safety. Since such a multitude of actors are influencing road traffic safety, both designers and users, the interface between each individual organization and the system is extremely important to identify and agree about. (...) There is a lack of road traffic safety management principles which have to be identified and used by top management in order to lead the organization towards systematic improved performance.
Language:English
Score: 1024451.5 - https://unece.org/DAM/trans/do...2007/ac11/AC11-2007-inf10e.pdf
Data Source: un
Since then it has been observed and promoted worldwide by several non-governmental organization (NGOs), including RoadPeace, the Association for Safe International Road Travel (ASIRT) and the European Federation of Road Traffic Victims (FEVR) and its associated organizations. (...) WHO, FEVR and RoadPeace have jointly developed a book, World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims: a guide for organizers , to provide practical guidance to people or groups on how to plan and organize events on this day. (...) All those concerned with road traffic crashes and their consequences are encouraged to use this guide to organize annual events in different parts of the world to ensure that the advocacy opportunity of this day is fully realized.
Language:English
Score: 1008152.05 - https://www.who.int/roadsafety/projects/world_day/en/
Data Source: un
Document    TWENTY-SEVENTH WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY   GENEVA, 7-23 MAY 1974          WHA27.59 Prevention of road traffic accidents   WHA27.59 Prevention of road traffic accidents   The Twenty-seventh World Health Assembly,   Noting with great concern the extensive and serious individual and public health problems resulting from road traffic accidents;   Recognizing that the use of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs contributes significantly to the heavy toll taken by road traffic accidents;   Believing that effective solutions require the coordinated efforts of international organizations and agencies, the Member States, regional and local authorities, and the world citizenry;   Declaring that the World Health Organization has a responsibility to provide leadership, guidance and technical assistance to Member States in the fields of improving road traffic safety in so far as human and medical factors are involved; and   Recalling resolution WHA19.36,   1. (...) RECOMMENDS that the World Health Organization should encourage and assist the development of improved programmes in the field of traffic safety; and   3. REQUESTS the Director-General:   (1) to study, in consultation with other intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations, means:   (a) of developing appropriate standards relating to the medical aspect of the licensing of drivers; Document   (b) of developing increasingly effective educational and other programmes designed to encourage responsible use of vehicles and roads; and (c) of promoting and coordinating further research required on human and medical factors involved in traffic accidents;   (2) to convene as soon as possible a group of experts to study the influence of alcohol and psychotropic drugs and their interaction on driver skills and traffic accidents; and   (3) to report to the Executive Board and to the Twenty ninth World Health Assembly on developments on these matters.  
Language:English
Score: 1005149.8 - https://www.who.int/violence_i...ublications/en/WHA2759_eng.pdf
Data Source: un
Road traffic injuries are projected to be the 5th leading cause of death globally by 2030. (...) To reverse global deaths and injuries from road traffic crashes, the five-year program will focus on ten low-and middle-income countries that have a high burden of road traffic injuries and fatalities, representing almost half (48%) of traffic deaths globally. (...) Ministers and senior officials from international road safety organizations in more than 100 countries will convene to draw attention to road traffic injuries and their impact on health and development globally.
Language:English
Score: 1002126.3 - https://www.who.int/roadsafety...nce/announcement_bloomberg.pdf
Data Source: un
S6_P3_Dickerson International Telecommunication Union ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 The Future PacketThe Future Packet--Based Based Network Network –– Issues & Issues & QuestionsQuestions Keith Dickerson Head of Standards, BT 2 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 Scope o Problems with Current Transport Layer Protocols o FPBN Requirements o FPBN Architecture o Questions 3 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 Problems with current transport layer protocols o Need to support different traffic types o Need to protect control and management planes from user-plane traffic o Need to guarantee and charge for Service Level Agreements o Need to ensure emergency services get through o Need to provide adequate security o Need to identify and locate faults o Need to monitor performance 4 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 FPBN Requirements (1) o provide both connectionless & connection-oriented services o support both public and private network services o support an appropriate range of QoS including best effort and guaranteed services o allow a smooth migration from current cl-ps and co- ps networks o interwork with current cl-ps and co-ps networks o support arbitrary network topologies The FPBN shall: 5 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 FPBN Requirements (2) o secure, protect and transport customer traffic as appropriate to the requirements of the service o detect, and recover from, facility and equipment failures and performance degradation o offer comprehensive OAM functions for each plane o secure the internal control and management plane traffic from attack o offer performance and behavior isolation between different traffic sources and types o support lawful intercept 6 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 FPBN Requirements (3) o be able to monitor the traffic conditions and bill for the service delivered o be able to distinguish between urgency and importance o support services that require in-order delivery of packets o support out-of-band control and management planes o attempt to keep traffic flowing while recovering from failures o only deliver traffic from the intended source to the intended destination(s) 7 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 FPBN Architecture? OOB control/management CL-PS core OOB control/management CO-PS core Traffic goes either CL-PS or CO-PS depending on service 8 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 Virtual Router Resource Partition Virtual Router UNIUNI per Class Routing/Queuing V V V VV V V V V V VVV V V Physical Router 9 dates ITU-T ITU-T Workshop on NGN (jointly organized with IETF) Geneva, 1-2 May 2005 Questions o Can FPBN provide QoS cost-effectively for all services?
Language:English
Score: 999219.3 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...presentations/s6-dickerson.pdf
Data Source: un
A/RES/64/255 2 Nations Road Safety Collaboration as a consultative mechanism whose members provide Governments and civil society with good practice guidelines to support action to tackle the major road safety risk factors and support their implementation, Recognizing the work of the United Nations regional commissions and their subsidiary bodies in increasing their road safety activities and advocating increased political commitment to road safety, and in this context welcoming the conclusions and recommendations of the project “Improving global road safety: setting regional and national road traffic casualty reduction targets”, implemented by the United Nations regional commissions to assist low- and middle-income countries in setting and achieving road traffic casualty reduction targets, Acknowledging the Ministerial Declaration on Violence and Injury Prevention in the Americas signed by the Ministers of Health of the Americas during the Ministerial Meeting on Violence and Injury Prevention in the Americas, held in Mérida, Mexico, on 14 March 2008, the Doha Declaration and other outcomes of the workshop on building the Arab Mashreq road safety partnership organized by the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia in Doha on 21 and 22 October 2008, 2 the conclusions and recommendations of the Economic Commission for Europe conference on the theme “Improving Road Traffic Safety in South-Eastern Europe: Setting Regional and National Road Traffic Casualty Reduction Targets”, held in Halkida, Greece, on 25 and 26 June 2009, the workshop on setting regional and national road traffic casualty reduction targets in the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia region organized by the Commission, in collaboration with the United Arab Emirates National Authority for Transportation, in Abu Dhabi on 16 and 17 June 2009, the conference on the theme “Make Roads Safe Africa” organized by the Economic Commission for Africa in Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania, on 8 July 2009, the Ministerial Declaration on Improving Road Safety in Asia and the Pacific, adopted at the Ministerial Conference on Transport organized by the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific in Busan, Republic of Korea, from 6 to 11 November 2006, 3 and the recommendations of the Expert Group Meeting on Improving Road Safety organized by the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific in Bangkok from 2 to 4 September 2009, noting, in particular, the usefulness of compiling guidelines outlining best practices in road safety improvement in the region, as well as the outcomes of expert group meetings on improving road safety organized by the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific in 2008 and 2009, Acknowledging also a number of other important international efforts on road safety, including the report of the International Transport Forum of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development entitled Towards Zero: Ambitious Road Safety Targets and the Safe System Approach, the International Conference on Road Safety at Work, held in Washington, D.C., from 16 to 18 February 2009, and the conference on the theme “Road Safety at Work”, held in Dublin on 15 June 2009, which highlighted the importance of fleet safety and the important role of the private sector in addressing driving behaviour concerns among their workers, Noting all national and regional initiatives to raise awareness of road safety issues, _______________ 2 See E/ESCWA/EDGD/2008/5. 3 E/ESCAP/63/13, chap. (...) Invites all Member States to set their own national road traffic casualty reduction targets to be achieved by the end of the Decade, in line with the plan of action; 8. (...) Encourages Governments, public and private corporations, non-governmental organizations and multilateral organizations to take action, as appropriate, to discourage distractions in traffic, including texting while driving, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality owing to road crashes; 11.
Language:English
Score: 999117.5 - https://www.who.int/violence_i...UN_GA_resolution-54-255-en.pdf
Data Source: un
On World Health Day 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank jointly launched the World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention. (...) As an aid to countries in planning events for the Day, the European Federation of Road Traffic Victims and WHO have developed a guide entitled World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims: A Guide For Organizers. (...) These organizations have collaborated with other partners to produce a number of products which, by portraying the human side of road traffic crashes, fill an important gap.
Language:English
Score: 998836.9 - https://www.who.int/roadsafety/news/un_sg_report_2007_en.pdf
Data Source: un
The tactical use of any given airspace by the SAAF, as flying training areas, and by ATNS for routing civil air traffic, is conducted on an hourly basis. This arrangement is successful due to both organizations having a mature understanding of FUA, correct attitude and information regarding both organizations’ objectives, continuous contact and communication at executive and senior management level as well as existence of formal agreements. (...) This is advantageous since air traffic volumes are generally low at air force bases and military controllers can be better prepared for radar courses at civil aerodrome units. 2.6 Both organizations have realised that areas of improvement are possible, and that this relationship can be expanded. (...) As part of this strategy, the recruitment tools for both the organizations will be harmonized. Training syllabus for both aerodrome and approach radar control courses will be standardised. 2.8 The Air Traffic Management infrastructure needs of the two organizations are similar in many areas.
Language:English
Score: 995464.1 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...tion%20in%20South%20Africa.pdf
Data Source: un
On World Health Day 2004, publication of the World Health Organization/World Bank World Report On Road Traffic Injury Prevention helped catalyse action. (...) In the resolution, the Assembly invited the regional commissions and WHO to organize jointly the first United Nations Global Road Safety Week and invited Member States and the international community, to recognize the third Sunday in November of every year as the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. 8. (...) A workshop on setting regional and national road traffic casualty reduction targets in the ESCWA region was held in June 2009, organized by ESCWA, in collaboration with the United Arab Emirates National Authority for Transportation and with the active participation of the WHO Regional Office for the Eastern A/64/266 11 09-44973 Mediterranean.
Language:English
Score: 994979 - https://www.who.int/roadsafety...utions/download/A64_266_en.pdf
Data Source: un
Review of international traffic exchange procedures under the bilateral system • 2. (...) Industry evolution: Wholesale organization • 6. The wholesale market • 7. Implications 3 Review of ITU bilateral system • Traditionally, traffic is exchanged between operators on a bilateral basis defined within ITU-T Recommendation D.150. (...) O H D 21 HUBBING • O does not have a TAR agreement with D • H and D may operate on the basis of – declaration – billing O H D O H D 22 HUBBING • The originating operator does not declare its traffic to the destination • The operator at the destination no longer knows the origin of the traffic O D O H D 23 HUBBING • The transit centres have been set up as hubs. • They are able to aggregate traffic towards given destinations, offering termination prices that give them a margin beyond the accounting rate shares in force for those destinations. • This is what constitutes the wholesale market for international traffic. • New hubbing offers are put on the market every month, so that operators are obliged to practise least-cost routing. • Forwarding traffic via hubs is simpler and less expensive than doing so through conventional transit and share agreements. • It is estimated that 30% of worldwide traffic was handled by hubs in 2005. 24 HUBBING • Tentative definition: “The routing of traffic in hubbing mode consists in routing traffic to final destinations via a transit centre (hub), with payment being made, solely to the latter, of the termination prices indicated in its hubbing offer.” • An organization which decides to forward its traffic in hubbing mode must: – monitor quality – obtain guarantees on CLI transmission – try to obtain quality commitments – strive to find the best quality at the best price – keep an eye on profits. 25 Evolution of the industry and organization of wholesale • The world of telecommunications is becoming increasingly complex. – From the bilateral system defined by ITU, with secure rules guaranteeing the exchange of international traffic, we have passed to a system dominated by the least-cost routing market, subject to neither regulation nor the law. – From an exchange relationship in which the origin, destination, and transit centre (if any) were clearly defined, along with their respective share of the fee, we have moved to a situation in which multi-POP operators use whatever means they can to attract the largest possible amount of traffic to a given destination (regardless of its origin) in a wholesale market. 26 Evolution of the industry and organization of wholesale – From a market controlled by approximately 200 incumbent operators, we have moved to one in which a large number of operators (over 4 000) compete for international traffic, but without elasticity. – From a world dominated by fixed telephony, we have entered a world of telecommunications dominated by mobile networks, the main factor of growth in international traffic. • These developments have had significant repercussions on most of our countries, with the traffic exchange market subject to strong wholesale pressure. 27 DEFINITION OF WHOLESALE MARKET • It is an operator-to-operator market HUB HUB 28 The wholesale market • A market for wholesale selling and buying of international traffic • Used to purchase traffic intended for various destinations, in hubbing mode • Providers publish their offers in the form of hubbing lists or A to Z lists • The lists give the prices offered for different destinations, and break down prices for each specific destination by: – fixed – mobile (different networks) – for fixed, may be broken down further by metropolitan and provincial. 29 The wholesale market • Competition between the providers has led to a price war that has kept strong pressure on the termination shares. • Numerous hubbing offers are published every month, making it necessary to identify the best offer (in terms of service quality and price) for least-cost routing. • This means that an appropriate organization is needed to optimize selling and buying. • Also, least-cost routing tools must be acquired. • Major importance should be attached to numbering plans (sale of networks).
Language:English
Score: 994666.9 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/fina...07/hubbing_saliou_toure_en.PDF
Data Source: un