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We affirm the a priori rights of parents in the education of their children as provided for in the  Universal Declaration of Human Rights and we also regard this right as non‐negotiable    Saint Lucia interprets all elements of this document which relate to minors, adolescents, and  youth in reference to the rights and duties of parents. To succeed in developing our countries,  we must ensure that parents are supported and enabled to raise their children according to  their values, traditions, and norms.    
Language:English
Score: 693801.37 - https://www.un.org/development...d_2011_cpd44_item9_stlucia.pdf
Data Source: un
Leave policies: Maternity, paternity and parental leaves paid at a high level of wage replacement and for moderate durations appear to have a positive influence on fertility behaviour. Excessively long parental leave entitlements may result in serious human capital deterioration, and they may be ineffective in removing the forced choice between having a career and childbearing. Parental leave entitlements that are not paid at sufficiently high rates tend to be similarly ineffective because they do not provide the necessary income security.
Language:English
Score: 691601.17 - https://www.un.org/development..._201511_policy_brief_no._1.pdf
Data Source: un
The unresolved work-life balance Inflexible work schedules make it difficult for parents, especially mothers, to reconcile work and family responsibilities. (...) Mothers and fathers can also take parental leave for up to 10 months. If fathers take parental leave for at least three months (even if not consecutive), the couple gets an additional “bonus” month. Parental leave is not well compensated, however, providing only 30 per cent of the pre-existing salary.
Language:English
Score: 691601.17 - https://www.un.org/development...201511_policy_brief_no._10.pdf
Data Source: un
Grandparents who provide childcare enable young parents to hold paid jobs. Taking care of frail parents keeps women out of the workplace and leaves them with reduced or no pension. (...) Multigenerational model of parent-child relations P C C P C P Omega Alpha G1 G2 Gn-1 Gn Janus When multiple parent-child links are considered, there is typically a pessimistic tone. (...) Simultaneous care for parents and care for children among mid-life British women.
Language:English
Score: 691521.5 - https://www.un.org/development...npd_egm_200508_09_hagestad.pdf
Data Source: un
Two- parent households are less prevalent in countries that have suffered high rates of adult mortality due to HIV/AIDS, including Swaziland, Namibia and South Africa, where less than half of households with children have two parents present. 6. (...) Percentage of households with children under age 15 years having two parents present or with one parent present, circa 2010 Data source: United Nations Database on Household Size and Composition 2017. (...) Note: Regional averages weighted according to the number of households with households.2 69 72 80 86 69 24 24 18 11 23 4 3 3 2 7 Northern America Latin America and the Caribbean Europe Asia Africa Two parents present One parent present (mother) One parent present (father) Percentage of households with children under 15 years 14 13 8 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Africa Asia Latin America and the Caribbean Europe and the United States P e rc e n ta g e 4 POPFACTS, No. 2017/2 October 2017 8.
Language:English
Score: 691003.76 - https://www.un.org/development...020/Jan/un_2017_factsheet2.pdf
Data Source: un
The report is also focused on the potential of digital technologies […] Technology Use and Families: Implications for Work-family Balance and Parenting Education This background report by Susan Walker – an Associate Professor of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota – examines the status of technology use and its impact on families and focuses on two key contexts that offer societal support to families: work-family balance and parenting education. (...) Especially families, where parents have been managing the care and education of children while juggling the new demands of working […] “Families and Migration” side event of the 60th Commission for Social Development (CSocD60), 9 February 2022 Preparations for the thirtieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family, 2024 Implementation of the objectives of the International Year of the Family and its follow-up processes Technology Use and Families: Implications for Work-family Balance and Parenting Education Digital Technologies, Families and the Impact on COVID-19 2021 International Day of Families: Families and New Technologies Family-oriented Priorities, Policies and Programmes Covid-19 and Families Publications Technology Use and Families: Implications for Work-family Balance and Parenting Education Family-oriented Priorities, Policies and Programmes in the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda Family Policies for Poverty Reduction, Work-Family Balance and Intergenerational Solidarity Men in Families and a Family Policy in Changing World BROWSE PUBLICATIONS Meetings and Events "Families and Migration" side event of the 60th Commission for Social Development (CSocD60), 9 February 2022 Virtual Expert Group Meeting on “Families in Development: Focus on Modalities for IYF +30, Parenting Education and the Impact of COVID-19 , 16-18 June 2020 International Day of Families Observance LEARN MORE International Observances Preparations for the thirtieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family, 2024 Twentieth Anniversary of the International Year of the Family (IYF) 2014 International Year of the Family (IYF) 1994 LEARN MORE Issues Anti-Poverty Family-Focused Policies Family-Oriented Anti-Poverty Policies Work-Family Balance Policies Policies and Programmes Supporting Intergenerational Relations Family policies in Latin America Resources Commission for Social Development Twentieth Anniversary of the IYF 2014 International Year of the Family (IYF) 1994 International Day of Families Tenth Anniversary of the IYF 2004 Technical Assistance UN Trust Fund   Social Media DISD e-Brochure Facebook Instagram Solidarity Day Twitter YouTube More DISD Social Media News UNSDN News on Family DESA News ECOSOC News UN News Centre UN Webcast on Family United Nations Copyright Fraud Alert Privacy Notice Site Index Terms of Use
Language:English
Score: 687517.04 - https://www.un.org/development/desa/family/
Data Source: un
My delegation continually emphasized the essential role of parents and the family, access to food, basic healthcare, education, and vocational training for employment. Unfortunately some delegations attempted to disregard the role of parents as if to somehow suggest that they are ill-equipped to raise their children. (...) My delegation expresses grave dismay at these various attempts against children, born and unborn, parents, and the family, by way of a document which is supposed to be on adolescents and youth, defined as young as 10 years of age by some UN offices and agencies.
Language:English
Score: 681480.5 - https://www.un.org/development...45_statement_holysee_item8.pdf
Data Source: un
And it is fear that basically took my parents over, that they could no longer rely on anyone else. (...) We moved after several incidents. MF: Your parents saw that it was not good. ST: No, it was not. (...) I have promised her I am taking her to her parents and I’m going to take her to her parents.
Language:English
Score: 680568.65 - https://www.un.org/en/awake-at...ight/S2-E4-born-to-help-others
Data Source: un
More than one half of children under age 3 are cared for by their parents, primarily by their mothers, and another one third are cared for by their grandparents. (...) Starting in 2002, the government provided up to two years’ unpaid parental leave for parents of children under age 3. Applications for parental leave were minimal, however, as most workers were unwilling to take leave without any salary compensation.
Language:English
Score: 675707.86 - https://www.un.org/development...201511_policy_brief_no._17.pdf
Data Source: un
Intergenerational mobility • Intergenerational income mobility in income is often measured by intergenerational earnings elasticity (IEE) – the likelihood that someone will inherit their parents' relative position of income level • IEE ranges from 0 (total mobility: no relationship between parent and child’s income) to 1 (no mobility: child’s income determined by parent’s income). • Intergenerational earnings elasticity varies significantly across countries, ranges from a low of 0.15 in Denmark to a high of 0.67 in Peru. • Countries with low levels of inequality have some of the greatest mobility, while countries with high levels of inequality have some of the lowest mobility. Intergenerational mobility • The influence of family background on an individual’s attainment may be the product of many factors – parenting, parental investment in social capital, etc. • Successful, wealthy and educated parents have more capital to invest in their children – private education, neighbourhoods with the best schools. • Poorer families have less to invest in their children – in monetary terms and – in terms of social capital • Spatial/residential segregation also plays a role – poorer families have less access to quality employment and education options Intergenerational mobility: The Great Gatsby Curve 10 Estimates of intergenerational earnings elasticity between father and son earnings 11 Recent Trends in Inequality: Education • The last 50 years have seen convergence in educational attainment between developed and developing countries • Among the global population aged over 15, the average years of schooling more than doubled – from 3.12 years in 1950 to 7.9 years in 2010 • The average number of years of schooling increased from: – 2.0 to 7.2 years in developing countries – 6.1 to 11.3 years in advanced economies • Education inequality within regions has been declining Gini index of education of the population aged 15 and over (1950-2010) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 World Advanced countries Developing countries East Asia and the Pacif ic Europe and Central Asia Latin America and the Caribbean Middle East and North Africa South Asia Sub-Saharan Africa Percentage of youth with completed lower secondary education by ethnicity and area of residence, latest available data since 2011, Rural areas Percentage of youth with completed lower secondary education by ethnicity and area of residence, latest available data since 2011, Urban areas Recent Trends in Inequality: Health • There has also been convergence in life expectancy at birth across major areas and geographical regions: – improvements in standards of living, nutrition, public hygiene, levels of education and technology • The absolute gap in life expectancy at birth between the more and the less developed regions shrank from 23 years in 1950- 1955 to 10 years in 2005-2010. • Most regions have experienced significant declines in child mortality, with exception of sub-Saharan Africa – However, regional gaps in child mortality still remain significant 16 Recent trends in the proportion of children stunted by ethnic group - Ghana, 1998-2014 Recent trends in the proportion of children stunted by ethnic group - Peru, 2000-2014 Labour force participation by disability status in selected countries, latest available data since 2000 Tackling Inequalities: Policies matter • A universal approach to social policy is key to inclusive development – it addresses the underlying causes of exclusion and social injustice. • Leaving no one behind also requires special or targeted measures that address the unique needs and vulnerabilities of excluded groups. • Leaving no one behind also calls for institutional change.
Language:English
Score: 674385.55 - https://www.un.org/development...les/2016-egm_amson_sibanda.pdf
Data Source: un