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Alhawi further indicates that the UNRWA DT’s deliberate rejection of evidence confirms its bias for the benefit of corrupt people within the Agency. Likewise, the Dean’s decision not to place him in the post after it had become vacant was evidence of malice against him. 6. (...) Furthermore, the UNRWA DT ignored his testimony that the number of students in the Department of English was fixed and he pointed out that if the incumbent had not suddenly resigned only two days after THE UNITED NATIONS APPEALS TRIBUNAL Judgment No. 2019-UNAT-938 6 of 9 taking up the role, she would still be teaching a course filled with students. (...) Alhawi’s submissions as to the number of students and classes were not previously submitted into evidence nor were they supported by the record.
Language:English
Score: 1043405.5 - www.un.org/en/internalj...at/judgments/2019-UNAT-938.pdf
Data Source: oaj
The allegations arose after a friend of Student A – Student B – informed his parents that Student A had been sexually exploited by the Applicant in the 2006/2007 school year (...) ” … The Investigation Committee interviewed 37 people, including members of the Fact Finding Committee, the Applicant’s current and former colleagues (head teachers, teachers, and school attendants), and the Applicant’s students and their families. (...) One of the [persons with the name of Student C] is currently a classmate of the Complainant and has a cousin by the name of [same name as Student D].
Language:English
Score: 1019434.8 - www.un.org/en/internalj...at/judgments/2014-UNAT-442.pdf
Data Source: oaj
People may practice creating and recognizing categorization. (...) By making predictions beforehand, people may have a chance to choose alternative solutions if their own model fails. – Explain (summarize, describe, discuss, define, etc.): The typical problems of learning are what students do not understand. (...) They should be exposed to other people (teachers and students) models. By communicating with each other, they must be informed of common pitfalls and misinterpretations and be ready to restructure their knowledge.
Language:English
Score: 930721.8 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page132.html
Data Source: un
The event was organized by the United Nations Remember Slavery Programme, which is managed by the Department of Global Communications’ Education Outreach Section, in collaboration with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Associated Schools Network, and Links, Inc., a youth branch affiliated with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). It brought together around 500 students from the New York metropolitan area, Kenya and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. (...) King of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines with student presenters and Kimberly Mann. Photo/DGC EOS   DPI hosts 10th Annual Global Student Videoconference on Slavery     The Tenth Annual Global Student Videoconference on the Transatlantic Slave Trade at United Nations Headquarters on 27 April, gave students from the United States, Mexico and the United Republic of Tanzania an opportunity to learn about the struggle of people of African descent towards freedom and equality. (...) Angela Missouri Sherman-Peter, Permanent Observer of CARICOM to the United Nations, led the students in an exercise highlighting the achievements of people of African descent.
Language:English
Score: 927320.6 - https://www.un.org/en/rememberslavery/student-conference
Data Source: un
The event was organized by the United Nations Remember Slavery Programme, which is managed by the Department of Global Communications’ Education Outreach Section, in collaboration with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Associated Schools Network, and Links, Inc., a youth branch affiliated with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). It brought together around 500 students from the New York metropolitan area, Kenya and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. (...) King of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines with student presenters and Kimberly Mann. Photo/DGC EOS   DPI hosts 10th Annual Global Student Videoconference on Slavery     The Tenth Annual Global Student Videoconference on the Transatlantic Slave Trade at United Nations Headquarters on 27 April, gave students from the United States, Mexico and the United Republic of Tanzania an opportunity to learn about the struggle of people of African descent towards freedom and equality. (...) Angela Missouri Sherman-Peter, Permanent Observer of CARICOM to the United Nations, led the students in an exercise highlighting the achievements of people of African descent.
Language:English
Score: 927320.6 - https://www.un.org/en/node/136579
Data Source: un
Let’s meet them and learn more about their work!   Aseel Soboh — UNRWA Student, and a member of the first-ever UNRWA Agency-wide Student Parliament   “ Like young people everywhere, young Palestine refugees are like all young men and women, are changemakers. ”   Aseel  Soboh  is a 17-year-old  Palestine refugee living in Lebanon ,  a  United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA)  Student  and a member of the first-ever UNRWA Agency-wide Student Parliament.   (...) UNRWA student parliamentarians contribute to SDGs in different ways through the activities they  organise  in their schools and local communities, such as awareness raising activities on the needs of children with disabilities, environmental initiatives, such as recycling projects, others on planting the school garden, activities to support elderly people in the community, activities to enhance students’ civic engagement and participation, and most recently COVID-19 awareness-raising campaigns.   (...) Check Out Abdullah’s Remarks at the Forum Read more on  organization :   Visit UNRWA website: https://www.unrwa.org/ Twitter: @ UNRWA   Instagram: @youifmsa   Facebook: @unrwa Learn more about UNRWA Student Parliaments:   https://www.unrwa.org/what-we-do/human-rights-education   Learn more about UNRWA and the SDGs :  https://www.unrwa.org/sdg_2020   Discover the Stories of Other Young People UNITED NATIONS A-Z Site Index | Contact | Copyright | FAQ | Fraud Alert | Privacy Notice | Terms of Use Page load link
Language:English
Score: 920061.5 - https://www.un.org/youthenvoy/...-the-decade-of-action-aseel-2/
Data Source: un
Involving all students in developing discipline and bullying policies · protecting the right of people with disabilities to community and family life through moving people out of long-stay institutions into the community · providing good healthcare, including accessible health, hygiene and nutrition programmes to ensure students are not held back by poor health or lack of suitable care · providing rehabilitation and habilitation services early on, to support students’ independence and wellbeing · equipping people with disabilities with the skills and confidence to get a job and participate in public and political life · ensuring that people with disabilities are not excluded from any cultural, leisure, sports or play activities · working with other countries and making inclusive education part of all international plans and programmes. (...) Services could also include training for students and their families and assessing students’ needs and arranging suitable support · having an expert teacher on hand within an education setting to support other teachers and students · building partnerships with other education institutions to share working practices · working with the wider community of parents, people with disabilities and disability organizations Other support and training Staff from a number of other organizations will need support and training on matters such as their responsibilities under the law and the rights of people with disabilities. (...) Working in partnership with people with disabilities and families Students with disabilities and, where relevant, their families should be seen as partners in inclusive education.
Language:English
Score: 917174.9 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...cation-PlainEnglishVersion.doc
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation 12-15 September, 2017 Colombo, Sri Lanka Pete Argent , ITU Expert ITU-TRCSL Training on ICTs for promoting Innovation & Entrepreneurship A New ICT Education Framework 2 Agenda  Case Study: Technology Entrepreneurship Training in Sydney, Australia  Modern Course Design Methodologies  Attracting new students About me • IBM Software Consultant for 10 years • Entrepreneur at heart • Started teaching coding 2013 • Love teaching and giving people the power that comes with creating technology. 3 Technology Entrepreneurship Training in Sydney, Australia A case study 4 Case Study • Student demographics • Student motivations • A holistic approach: From idea to launch 5 Student demographics 6 Student demographics • What types of people are interested in learning how to build their own technology enterprise? (...) 21 Fast pace of change • Technology is improving and changing every day • If teachers have trouble keeping up – how will students be able to? • ONE SOLUTION: Teach students how to teach themselves or “Learn how to learn”. 22 Augmented intelligence • No one can know everything • Knowing how to find the information you need is important • Search skills & recognising quality articles/tutorials/websites • Reading and Understanding documentation • Using Q&A websites like StackOverflow and Quora • Finding and following tutorials • Keeping abreast of news, have an interest in what is going on outside your bubble • Teaching others helps you learn 23 Traditional vs Modern Course Design • In some industries, qualifications are becoming less important than demonstrable experience. • Traditionally creative industries like music, art and design have long been like this. • It is now being seen in programming. 24 Traditional vs Modern Course Design • Teaching students the information to pass exams is being seen as an inferior methodology. • Practical, real world projects that prepare students for the work they will be doing can produce superior outcomes. 25 Outcomes that impact peoples’ lives • In Australia, Universities seem to only care about their students graduating – not whether they have the skills required to secure a job. • This can sometimes be due to the academics having limited real world work experience and not keeping up with changing technologies. 26 Outcomes that impact peoples’ lives • Our goal should be to focus on delivering impactful outcomes for students. • To have started an online business that has a growing customer base. • To have a well paid job in their chosen career path. 27 Teaching methodologies • Quality course design, development • Passionate teachers • Buddy system • Gamification • Built in peer support systems • Experts and mentors • Feedback loops & continual improvement 28 Quality course design and development • Consider • situational factors • impactful outcomes • themes of course • Plan activities that challenge students to discover information and skills on their own and in teams. • Less lecturing and more discussions – no spoon feeding of information 29 Real world projects • Challenging students to find a real world project to work on is powerful. • We ask students to find a local business owner who needs a website. • Experience finding and working with a client • Helping local community • Adds to student’s portfolio • Gains confidence 30 Passionate teachers • We all recognise that a teacher’s role in class is not just to impart information. • It is our job to inspire our students to want to learn, to work hard and be successful. • Learning should be fun! If we focus on making sure our students are having fun, we have fun too! 31 Buddy system • In some classes it is a great idea to have a buddy system. • Students form pairs to provide additional accountability and support. • Higher achievement by all. 32 Gamification • A great tool to encourage participation and adoption of personal qualities that are preferred by employers. • We give award points for: • Quality code • Agility • Collaboration • Leadership • Community participation • A quality prize and recognition is important. 33 Peer support systems • Chat boards like Slack • Peer review projects and activities • Students learn from their peers as much as from the teacher and encourages participation and collaboration. 34 Experts and mentors • Bringing in people who work in the industry allows students to connect and network and hear about different companies. • Shows them the teacher knows what they’re talking about • An excursion to a workplace is a bonus. 35 Feedback and continual improvement • Tight feedback loops – don’t wait til the end of the course to get it. • One-on-one sessions • Update course materials regularly 36 Attracting new students 37 Attracting new students • Some people already know they need to learn about technology to improve their career or start a technology focused business. • We aim to reach people who don’t realise the opportunities that are available to them from learning technology skills. 38 Activities to attract new students • Free workshops • Hackathons • Meetup groups • Primary school & high school visits • Community events • Speaking engagements • Videos and podcasts 39 40
Language:English
Score: 916598.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R...cation%20Framework%20Peter.pdf
Data Source: un
The main features of inclusive education Inclusive education involves: · commitment from leadership and everyone in an education setting to make inclusive education happen · recognizing that everyone has the ability to learn · adapting to meet the needs of each person to help them reach their full potential · training and supporting teachers and staff so they have the right attitudes and skills · welcoming all students equally – all students should feel valued, respected included and listened to · building a safe, positive learning environment, with help from students to do this · developing students’ confidence to enable them to move on to further education, training or work · developing partnerships with the wider community, including parents, teacher and student bodies and organizations of people with disabilities · closely monitoring progress in inclusive education, with help from people with disabilities and parents and carers where relevant Accessibility All parts of the education system must be accessible to people with disabilities. (...) Involving all students in developing discipline and bullying policies · protecting the right of people with disabilities to community and family life through moving people out of long-stay institutions into the community · ensuring people with disabilities can travel independently, through the use of transport, mobility aids or other support and training · providing good healthcare, including accessible health, hygiene, nutrition and sex education programmes to ensure students are not held back by poor health or lack of suitable care · providing rehabilitation and habilitation services early on, to support students’ independence and wellbeing · equipping people with disabilities with the skills and confidence to get a job and participate in public and political life · ensuring that people with disabilities are not excluded from any cultural, leisure, sports or play activities · working with other countries and making inclusive education part of all international plans and programmes. (...) Working in partnership with people with disabilities and families Students with disabilities and, where relevant, their families should be seen as partners in inclusive education.
Language:English
Score: 914402.5 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...Right_Inclusive_Education.docx
Data Source: un
According to UNESCO, "half of the world's pupils and students continue to be affected by the total or partial closure of schools and universities," which means more than 800 million young people around the world. (...) Solidarity refrigerators also store food collected by associations but on a smaller scale. Young people prefer this kind of assistance, often student-to-student, rather than conventional aid centres. (...) Often housed in cramped spaces or student bedrooms, these young people spend their days in front of a computer with very little social interaction.
Language:English
Score: 910910.8 - https://www.un.org/en/coronavi...demic-students-rely-solidarity
Data Source: un