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W President, European Aviation M NGAP Montreal 1st – eting the future foreting the future for ngineering Williams Maintenance Training Committee – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Cont EAMTC i• EAMTC overview • Findd • Train and Qualify • Retain • Conclusion• Conclusion NGAP Montreal 1st – tents – 4th March 2010 EAMTC EAM • An industry body dedicated to i t t i i European Aviation Maintenance Training C maintenance training • Established 1984 • Registered 2007 as a non- profit Foundation in The Netherlands • Main objectives NGAP Montreal 1st – MTC • Members from training & associated domains (OEM Airlines MRO Committee domains (OEM, Airlines, MRO, Basic & Type training schools, Courseware / Training media providers etc)providers etc) • To promote and harmonise cross- border training • Improve aviation safety through trainingtraining Represent the aircraft maintenance training industry at EASA – 4th March 2010 EAMTC EAM • Secondary objectives European Aviation Maintenance Training C • Benefits NGAP Montreal 1st – MTC Be recognised as the expert in aviation maintenance training Committee g Exchange information between members Cooperate with other related organisationsorganisations Improve training quality & effectiveness Inform members of new learning technologies Act as an advisory body to membersAct as an advisory body to members Propose amendments towards EASA on behalf of the members To discuss NPA with EASA Safety through training Share experience & work done Interact with leading playersInteract with leading players EASA contact Help shape European aviation training legislation – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Fin Next generation Profile J b i t d killJob associated skills NGAP Montreal 1st – nd computer literate/human machine interface skillsinterface skills “human skills”, literate, numerate, communicators, team players skill of hand - as important as in the past Increasing emphasis on composite materialsp – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Fin Compete for To find the people we need Compete for trainees/employees with other “attractive” industries • Mature industry image as perceived by the general l tipopulation NGAP Montreal 1st – nd IT, banking, insurance, law, g medicine etc Raise the profile of our work to show it in its best lightit in its best light We need people at all levels Make our industry inviting, welcoming open and accessiblewelcoming, open and accessible – hard work – dirty – oil and grease – cold and wet/environmental Shift k– Shift work – family/social issues around travel away from home as part of the job – Interesting – 4th March 2010 Interesting EAMTC Fin • Seen as “oil and grease” Promote industry image Construction Industry/Building site workers Other outdoor professions y g – surveyors – engineers Environment workers Researchers Sports industry workers and players HealthHealth – Paramedics Police NGAP Montreal 1st – nd E it tExcitement Hi-tech Opportunities and scope of activities/professionsactivities/professions – other outdoor professions have a high perception in the community Horticulture/Agricultureg – Horticultural experts – Forestry experts – Veterinarians Infrastructure – Bridges/Structural engineers – Electrical engineers – Telephone engineersTelephone engineers – Telecommunications engineers – Road surveyors/engineers – Rail surveyors/engineers – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Fin Some of the issues Licensing requirements Economic and structural changes in the industrychanges in the industry Societal trends making the g job less attractive than in years past 'Mechanics Wanted', Air Transport World, October 2008 NGAP Montreal 1st – Mechanics Wanted , Air Transport World, October 2008 nd S d iStructured, progressive Relentless pressure on costs Business cycle makes aviation lessBusiness cycle makes aviation less attractive than some sectors Time for us to update our image – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and Manpower To meet OEM projected sales NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify For a/c flying today T t ith d i /Target moves with advances in a/c technology – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and SAFETY i N 1 i it Today and tomorrow • SAFETY is our No1 priority • Evolution of specialisations NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify • Keep doing well what we do well• Keep doing well what we do well • Improve other areas (e.g. following procedures, human error) • Development linked to the evolution of aircraft technology Ai f E i (B1)– Airframe, Engine (B1) – Electrical, Instruments, Radio, Radar, Auto Pilot, Compass (B2) – Merging of “trades”/specialisationsMerging of trades /specialisations – HMI – Changing skill of hand – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and Focus on all areas train are & p ra ct ic al Certifying staff App in g th eo ry & Technicians ip s co m bi n pp re nt ic es h Fitters/MechanicsAp NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify ning participation rates of those with tertiary education often 5 or 10 times higher than those of the low-skilled proved Type Training Skill Approved Basic Training Skill of Hand - Practical – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and K l d kill ttit d Training, Qualifying and Licensing • Knowledge, skills, attitude • Role of theRole of the instructional/assessment staff • Licensing requirements NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify • Exams, competence assessments, attitude (interpersonal/soft skill competencies, less objective, less bl t t k tmeasurable, not task or type specific) • Train staff to meet new roles • Coach/Facilitator • Competence assessmentp • Structured, accessible • Emphasis on competence as well as knowledgeknowledge • Ease of transfer of previously owned knowledge, skills – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and • Different methods for different Support for training • Different methods for different countries Government/industry liaison Individual ownership Recognition of prior learningRecognition of prior learning NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify • “self-starter”• self-starter • free market • State sponsored • Co-financedCo financed • Incentive programmes • education systems/syllabi that suit industry/society needs • Lifelong learning • Encourage individual responsibility h l d• help to reduce costs – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and • Training/adult learning Promote & fund training/learning g g • Challenge to find solutions where financial constraints are an obstacle to investment and participation in learning • Give choice to individuals NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify • could be private (company or individual) and/or government co- financed • Employers and individuals could h t i i t d ld bshare training cost and could be linked to prevent “poaching” • Company networks, large enterprises provide training to small ones or pool the resources amongones or pool the resources among firms with different training capacities – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Train and • Global collaboration at the Qualification process evolution Global collaboration at the technical level NGAP Montreal 1st – d qualify • ICAO, regulatory authorities, training , g y , g bodies Arrange regionally Promote harmonisationPromote harmonisation Inclusive - free and open to all Encourage free participation and h i f i f tisharing of information EAMTC, Europe’s largest maintenance training foundation, ready to play its part – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Ret More fl id than in the past Workforce mobility More fluid than in the past Changing valuesChanging values Link academic and practical Encourage “upwards mobility” NGAP Montreal 1st – tain • Can train and re train• Can train and re-train • Move between jobs E l k b t d l• Employees seek best deal • Traditional employee sources no longer there • Ensure due credit is given to practical skills • Transfer of previously owned k l d d killknowledge and skills – 4th March 2010 EAMTC Retain – P t ti l b i Encourage participation in training • Potential barriers • Ease time arrangements • Develop lifelong learning • Provide flexible alternatives NGAP Montreal 1st – – re-train Lack of motivation• Lack of motivation • lack of time • financial constraints • Tracking methods • LMS• LMS • Instructor-group sessions • co-ordination between education and employment • Self-starters • Part-time learning • Distance learning – 4th March 2010 • Distance learning EAMTC Concl • To find the people we need • Training • Qualification • RetainRetain NGAP Montreal 1st – usion • Upgrade our image • Make our industry one that is• Make our industry one that is attractive, accessible and encourages upwards mobility • Focus on all levels • Ensure accessibility • Will evolve with a/c design• Will evolve with a/c design • Increasing attention on competence Promote harmonisation• Promote harmonisation • Remove barriers to training • Ensure flexibility for individuals – 4th March 2010 EAMTC THANK Refs: ITQI Report 2008 OECD Promoting Adult Learning – ISBN 92-64-01092-0 – © OECD 20 NGAP Montreal 1st – http://www.oecd.org/document/57/0,3343,en_2649_39263238_36675 K YOU 005 EAMTC www.eamtc.org – 4th March 2010 769_1_1_1_1,00.html
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Score: 989959.8 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...r%20aircraft%20engineering.pdf
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Current global spending on W&S = $30 B/Year Ø External aid: 17% Ø Int’l private sector: 9% Ø Domestic public sector: 69% Ø Domestic private sector: 5% To achieve Int’l targets; additional $25 B/year required Ø $8 B for water supply Ø $17 B for sanitation CHALLENGE 3 Inadequate Capital Investments 6 CHALLENGE 4 Ensuring Sustainability Sustainability of water infrastructure Sustainability of water resource Issues of water quality KEY PLAYERS IN PROVISION OF W&S SERVICES IN URBAN AREAS State/City Governments (Municipalities) Public Utilities Privately Operated Utilities Small Scale Water Providers Community Based Organizations 7 GENERAL STATE OF PUBLIC WATER UTILITIES 1. (...) ACCOUNTABILITY BARRIERS FOR PUBLIC WATER UTILITIES Unclear expectations—multiple principals with multiple goals The “Not Me” syndrome Confusion between cause and effect 9 MULTIPLE PRINCIPALS WITH MULTIPLE OBJECTIVES Multiple Principals Fuzzy Goals and Objectives Parliament Finance Ministry Planning Ministry Admin. (...) Public utilities will remain the leading player 2. These utilities could be turned around 3.
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Score: 987427 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...sia/presentations/chaudhry.pdf
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Why a paper on land banking? 2. Objectives 3. Approaches 4. Governance – institutional and legal framework 5. (...) Why a paper on land banking? 2. Objectives 3. Approaches 4. Governance – institutional and legal framework 5. (...) Why a paper on land banking? 2. Objectives 3. Approaches 4. Governance – institutional and legal framework 5.
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Score: 986360.7 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...cuments/LANDNET/2012/04_en.pdf
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Developed by the Open Ended Working Group of the BC in association with the major players in the mobiles handset market and research institutions. Standards and Guidelines Applicable to E-Waste Management - MPPI The overall objective of MPPI was to promote the objectives of the Basel Convention in the area of the environmentally sound management of end-of-life mobile phones. (...) Further Information on the MPPI Guidelines can be found at http :// www.basel.int/Implementation/TechnicalAssistance/Partnerships/MPPI/Overview/tabid/3268/Default.aspx Standards and Guidelines Applicable to E-Waste Management - PACE Programme of Action of Computing Equipment (PACE) Also developed under the Basel Convention View is to develop a series of standards and guidelines for the ESM of used and end-of-life computer equipment, specifically desktops and laptops Like the MPPI, the PACE Guidelines are being developed by a tripartite Working Group made up of members of the BC OEWG, the major players in the Computer industry and research institutions, but also includes stakeholder interest groups like BAN.
Language:English
Score: 985448 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W...ining/S1P1%20Ahmed%20Khan.pptx
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OUTCOMES OF THE GAP ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSING SECTOR IN WESTERN BALKAN COUNTRIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY OUTCOMES OF THE GAP ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSING SECTOR IN WESTERN BALKAN COUNTRIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY ECE/ENERGY - 8th Session of the Group of Experts on Energy Efficiency Analysis objective and approach • Analysis focused on energy efficiency in Multi-Apartment Buildings – one of the largest energy user in each country, with a substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement, but also the most difficult to implement • Provide comparative gap analysis with the benchmarked best practices from the regions that have made substantial progress in MAB refurbishing (e.g., Slovakia); • Review of current housing policies, institutional structures, energy efficiency policies, reform agendas, as well as the banking sector landscape in the selected Western Balkans countries • Identify opportunities for legislative and regulatory improvements, capacity building, and financing models for developing enabling environment for energy efficiency investment by HOAs • Help focusing on the principal issues hindering energy efficiency improvement by future development assistance programming, policies and regulations • Help banking industry better understand the residential energy efficiency market size, potential and risks Residential housing energy efficiency in Western Balkans Main stakeholders, main issues Homeowners HOAs & Maintenance Co’s  Ageing building stock in urgent need of renovation  Need for capacity building for Home-owner associations (HOAs) and private building maintenance companies performing routine maintenance and capital renovation  Lack of resources for comprehensive renovation, insufficient level of fees, poor enforcement of fees  Limited institutional capacities in management, financing, energy efficiency Government Sources and Types of Financing  Ministries, agencies, municipalities  Insufficient legal-regulatory framework,, poor enforcement  Lack of national housing policy or building renovation strategy  Discrepancies between state and local government responsibilities • National housing and energy related funds • Municipal budgets, subsidies • International/bilateral donors grants • International financial institutions loans • Commercial banks/credit institutions loans • Green funds and non-governmental institutions loans and grants • “Unintended” impact of subsidies, grants and soft loans  Privatization gave households their ownership over real estate in all Western Balkan countries  Multi-apartment Building (MAB) households are responsible for O&M and repair of buildings, including energy efficiency improvements.  Mixed incomes / affordability  Decision-making is difficult Analysis Revelations – obvious and not that obvious • Virtually all energy efficiency implementations has grant component to “get the energy efficiency investment engine started” – for the last 3 decades !! • Very similar in each Western Balkan country, energy efficiency investment is hindered by several complex, interrelated issues, such as insufficient legal and regulatory environment, subsidized energy prices, low capacity for implementation, banking industry reluctance • Banks perceive lending to HOAs as extremely high risk due to multiple decision- makers/accountability, HOA legal status, low maintenance fees, irregular payments, difficult payment enforcement, lack of collateral • Rehabilitation of residential buildings in Western Balkans is Euro 4 bln market - single largest untapped market with large potential for CO2 reduction, job creation, positive impact on energy poverty, housing affordability, homelessness • Such level of investment cannot be funded by only public funds – it requires private, commercially based funding, not distorting market by grants and subsidies • Complex solution must include provisions for assisting vulnerable population 5 Recommended actions and next steps Governments Continue reform in housing, energy efficiency, banking regulations Develop clear strategies in prioritizing and financing building renovation Carefully target public/municipal finance for leveraging commercial EE lending in Building renovation (grants, guarantees, support schemes) Enroll (existing/new) public agencies in promotion and facilitation Learn from best practices: Slovakia, Romania, Poland, Croatia Hungary, Baltics Donors Streamline technical assistance for policy reform Strengthen the capacities of market players; particularly the HOAs for better creditworthiness Help design tailor made support mechanisms, support in development, implementation and monitoring of high-quality projects in building EE renovation Raise awareness of all players on the benefits of EE renovation Seek targeted use of grants for improving bankability of investments, financing building reinforcement/accessibility, subsidizing socially vulnerable households Seek pooled financing by multiple donors/IFIs Financial Institutions Provide affordable, tailor-made financing for building renovation to HOAs Partner with government in setting up guarantee facilities Require elimination of distortionary grant subsidies and aim for gradual commercialization of building EE investment finance Work with central banks/treasuries to design flexible financing products (project finance, unsecured lending, factoring) Partner with private sector (ESCOs) to manage and minimize risks 6 Andrew Popelka Senior Energy Advisor, Energy and Infrastructure Division Bureau for Europe and Eurasia U.S. Agency for International Development T 202-567-4514 | apopelka@usaid.gov https://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PA00X3QN.pdf Report can be accessed at: Thank you https://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PA00X3QN.pdf OUTCOMES OF THE GAP ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSING SECTOR IN WESTERN BALKAN COUNTRIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY Analysis objective and approach Residential housing energy efficiency in Western BalkansMain stakeholders, main issues Analysis Revelations – obvious and not that obvious Recommended actions and next steps Slide Number 6
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Score: 985448 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...lysis%20of%20the%20housing.pdf
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. • Strengthening the regulation of infrastructure sharing and the search for dynamic mechanisms and spectrum sharing, as well as flexibility and agility in formalities and authorizations associated with new infrastructure projects in which the different market player types can participate as partners. • Implementing practices such as “regulatory sandboxes” as a means of promoting innovation in digital infrastructure investment. (...) Similarly, collaborative national and international regulation, a multistakeholder approach comprising as many players in the technological ecosystem as possible, is important as it will allow for a global vision and coverage and should, therefore, be pursued at all stages of the regulatory process, i.e. all the way from design to implementation. (...) In the light of all of the above, IFT developed its Roadmap 2021-2025,1 in which one of the objectives is identified as “promoting the development of the digital ecosystem and adopting new technologies and digital use cases” with a view to meeting the demands of the current environment.
Language:English
Score: 985448 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/C...tion_14_IFT_Mexico_English.pdf
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I would like to thank all of them also for the support they provided during the Workshop to moderate the interesting discussions in the various roundtables on the WRC-23 issues at stake. The other key players were of course the Chairmen and Representatives of the main six regional groups and various stakeholders, who have also supported the preparation and have participated in the roundtables of this Workshop. (...) For this reason, this Workshop has already fulfilled one its main objectives. Another main objective achieved at this Workshop is to clearly identify the responsible persons, leaders and key-players for the various agenda items of WRC- 23, to be able to further discuss with them in the coming months.
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Score: 985448 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/D...ctor%20BR%20-%2015.12.2021.pdf
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Joint ITU-CTIF-GISFI Workshop on Education about Standardization Committed to connecting the world Search for: ITU General Secretariat Radiocommunication Standardization About ITU-T Events All Groups Standards Resources BSG Study Groups Regional Presence Join ITU-T Development ITU Telecom Members' Zone Join ITU Joint ITU-CTIF-GISFI Workshop on Education about Standardization Rollup Image You are here ITU > Home > ITU-T > Workshops and Seminars > ITU-GISFI-CTIF Standards Education Workshop > 2013 Share Page Content 20 Atlantic City, New Jersey, 25 June, 2013 Contact: tsbworkshops@itu.int Introduction Recognizing the important role international standards play in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) field, and the key contribution academia makes by producing standards-minded graduates, the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T), Aalborg University’s Center for TeleInFrastruktur (CTIF), and the Global ICT Standardization Forum for India (GISFI) are organizing the Joint ITU-CTIF-GISFI Workshop on Education about Standardization to be held on 25 June 2013. Objectives  The objective of the workshop is to collect elements to assist in the creation of guidelines for a Syllabus on Education about Standardization. Target audience The event targets an audience of ITU Academia Members and other academic institutions, research centres and laboratories; international, regional and national standards development organizations (SDOs); international organizations and industry associations; and all other interested regional bodies, government representatives, private-sector players and individuals. This workshop also builds on the outcomes of the Joint ITU-GISFI-DS-CTIF Standards Education Workshop held on 8-9 October 2012 and the Joint ITU-IECIE-CTIF-GISFI workshop held on 25 April, 2013 in Kyoto, Japan, with the objective of exploring the standardization curricula currently offered by different academic institutions.  
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Score: 985127 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W.../sew/201306/Pages/default.aspx
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Open Pluggable Specification :– An integrated modular DS media player solution that interconnects with the display panel via a standard mating internal connector interfaceinternal connector interface Functional Block Diagram Docking Board Power Supply Unit TMDS DisplayPort Pluggable module 8 0 p in JA E T X 2 5 Board Panel Control Board USB for Touch-screen, Camera, RFID device etc HDMI/DVI Audio UART Panel 8 0 p in JA E T X 2 4 Legend: Display panel components DP Sink Audio 3*USB 2.0 Power DisplayPort UART Control Signals DC+12~+19V Legend: Display panel components Pluggable Module Prototype Compact dimension (mm): 180 119 30 1st Fan-less solution for up to Intel® Core™ i7 LV Processor (25W) 200 119 X Intel® Active Management Technology (AMT6.0) enabled for OOB remote manageability Interconnect Features 1.JAE TX25 Plug & TX24 Receptacle Connectors Blind-mate type - higher tolerance on mating misalignment 80 pin circuits – 40 top and 40 bottom contacts 500 Insertion Lifecycle 2. Supported Interfaces Power HDMI/DVI and DisplayPort AudioAudio USB2.0/3.0 UART OPS Control Signals OPS Technologies Value Added Made Easy Lower Total Cost of Ownership Increased Return of Investment O P E X I M P A C T Installation & Usage •Higher Implementation Cost Upgradability O P S S O L U T IO N Simplify Installation • Less cabling • Space saving • Consolidated H/W, Image Sensor, NFC, Touch etc Seamless Upgradability Improved OPEX with OPS O P E X I M P A C T •Difficult to Upgrade Reliability •Connection & Wiring Reliability Serviceability •Hard to Access & O P S S O L U T IO N Seamless Upgradability • Modularity and Scalability • Interchangeable Improved Reliability • Less cabling with JAE Connector • Reduced liability - Less tangible components e.g Power Supply Improved Serviceability Open Pluggable Specification (OPS)9 •Hard to Access & Maintenance O P S S O L U T IO N Improved Serviceability • Active management capability • Easy swap OPS modules • HW KVM for POP and HDMI CEC for POD Agenda • Digital Signage Open Pluggable Specification (OPS) Introduction • Digital Signage Open Pluggable Specification (OPS) Update OPS Business Model • EBM designs, manufactures & ships pluggable modules based on Open Pluggable Specification • Industry Alliance EBMs/OEMs/Standard Bodies Embedded Open Pluggable Specification •SI/Network Operators EBMs/OEMs/Standard Bodies Embedded Board Manufacturer (EBM) • Co-develop • Provide samples for test and Validation De-facto Standard • Buys pluggable module from Intel’s enabled EBMs • Integrates module into OEM displays Display OEM DS DISPLAY OEM: • Faster TTM on new DS player adoption/migration • Better product scalability and offering • Easier & faster distribution for the market OPS Standardization Benefits EBM & IA ODM: • Increase high volume business opportunities • Driving standard reference design for pluggable module – high volume lower costs ECOSYSTEM & DS ADOPTERS:ECOSYSTEM & DS ADOPTERS: • Increased reliability between DS Player & display • Space saving + easier deployment • Modularity and scalability • Improved maintenance process OPS Plug Fest Update • Objective: • Ensure OPS modules produced by ODMs/OEMs can work seamlessly with OPS displays for OPS broad market engagementengagement • Date: Jan 9th -10th, 2012 (two-day event) • Time: 9:30AM – 16:30PM • Venue: Regent Hotel, Taipei • Participants as of Dec. 1, 2011 • 6 OPS module manufactures • 8 OPS display manufactures http://edc.intel.com/Applications/Digital-Signage/OPS/ To download the spec and for more information on OPS go to: Questions on OPS? (...) Reliability • Connection & Wiring Reliability Extra cabling Space consuming Compromised Reliability Extra Logistics Fragmented DVD Player PC Challenges 4. Serviceability • Hard to Access & Maintenance Media Player Save Operating Expenditure (OPEX) with Digital Signage Open Pluggable Specification (OPS)
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Score: 984949.2 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../06/5B/T065B00000B0063PDFE.pdf
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For 2014 we have decided on a rebrand to focus on the future and kickstart the discussions between all players that, it is increasingly clear, are essential to moving more swiftly towards intelligent and autonomous driving. It is why we have reshaped the event to include two high-level sessions that will engage key industry players and other stakeholders with a view to tackling some of the obstacles facing rollout of these technologies. (...) UNECE is an important player in this field and a key partner for our work as we me move forward.
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Score: 983993.8 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/t.../Pages/FutureNetworkedCar.aspx
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