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Joint ITU-CTIF-GISFI Workshop on Education about Standardization Committed to connecting the world Search for: ITU General Secretariat Radiocommunication Standardization About ITU-T Events All Groups Standards Resources BSG Study Groups Regional Presence Join ITU-T Development ITU Telecom Members' Zone Join ITU Joint ITU-CTIF-GISFI Workshop on Education about Standardization Rollup Image You are here ITU > Home > ITU-T > Workshops and Seminars > ITU-GISFI-CTIF Standards Education Workshop > 2013 Share Page Content 20 Atlantic City, New Jersey, 25 June, 2013 Contact: tsbworkshops@itu.int Introduction Recognizing the important role international standards play in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) field, and the key contribution academia makes by producing standards-minded graduates, the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T), Aalborg University’s Center for TeleInFrastruktur (CTIF), and the Global ICT Standardization Forum for India (GISFI) are organizing the Joint ITU-CTIF-GISFI Workshop on Education about Standardization to be held on 25 June 2013. Objectives  The objective of the workshop is to collect elements to assist in the creation of guidelines for a Syllabus on Education about Standardization. Target audience The event targets an audience of ITU Academia Members and other academic institutions, research centres and laboratories; international, regional and national standards development organizations (SDOs); international organizations and industry associations; and all other interested regional bodies, government representatives, private-sector players and individuals. This workshop also builds on the outcomes of the Joint ITU-GISFI-DS-CTIF Standards Education Workshop held on 8-9 October 2012 and the Joint ITU-IECIE-CTIF-GISFI workshop held on 25 April, 2013 in Kyoto, Japan, with the objective of exploring the standardization curricula currently offered by different academic institutions.  
Language:English
Score: 992995.9 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W.../sew/201306/Pages/default.aspx
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Developed by the Open Ended Working Group of the BC in association with the major players in the mobiles handset market and research institutions. Standards and Guidelines Applicable to E-Waste Management - MPPI The overall objective of MPPI was to promote the objectives of the Basel Convention in the area of the environmentally sound management of end-of-life mobile phones. (...) Further Information on the MPPI Guidelines can be found at http :// www.basel.int/Implementation/TechnicalAssistance/Partnerships/MPPI/Overview/tabid/3268/Default.aspx Standards and Guidelines Applicable to E-Waste Management - PACE Programme of Action of Computing Equipment (PACE) Also developed under the Basel Convention View is to develop a series of standards and guidelines for the ESM of used and end-of-life computer equipment, specifically desktops and laptops Like the MPPI, the PACE Guidelines are being developed by a tripartite Working Group made up of members of the BC OEWG, the major players in the Computer industry and research institutions, but also includes stakeholder interest groups like BAN.
Language:English
Score: 992845.9 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W...ining/S1P1%20Ahmed%20Khan.pptx
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. • Strengthening the regulation of infrastructure sharing and the search for dynamic mechanisms and spectrum sharing, as well as flexibility and agility in formalities and authorizations associated with new infrastructure projects in which the different market player types can participate as partners. • Implementing practices such as “regulatory sandboxes” as a means of promoting innovation in digital infrastructure investment. (...) Similarly, collaborative national and international regulation, a multistakeholder approach comprising as many players in the technological ecosystem as possible, is important as it will allow for a global vision and coverage and should, therefore, be pursued at all stages of the regulatory process, i.e. all the way from design to implementation. (...) In the light of all of the above, IFT developed its Roadmap 2021-2025,1 in which one of the objectives is identified as “promoting the development of the digital ecosystem and adopting new technologies and digital use cases” with a view to meeting the demands of the current environment.
Language:English
Score: 992845.9 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/C...tion_14_IFT_Mexico_English.pdf
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I would like to thank all of them also for the support they provided during the Workshop to moderate the interesting discussions in the various roundtables on the WRC-23 issues at stake. The other key players were of course the Chairmen and Representatives of the main six regional groups and various stakeholders, who have also supported the preparation and have participated in the roundtables of this Workshop. (...) For this reason, this Workshop has already fulfilled one its main objectives. Another main objective achieved at this Workshop is to clearly identify the responsible persons, leaders and key-players for the various agenda items of WRC- 23, to be able to further discuss with them in the coming months.
Language:English
Score: 992845.9 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/D...ctor%20BR%20-%2015.12.2021.pdf
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OUTCOMES OF THE GAP ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSING SECTOR IN WESTERN BALKAN COUNTRIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY OUTCOMES OF THE GAP ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSING SECTOR IN WESTERN BALKAN COUNTRIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY ECE/ENERGY - 8th Session of the Group of Experts on Energy Efficiency Analysis objective and approach • Analysis focused on energy efficiency in Multi-Apartment Buildings – one of the largest energy user in each country, with a substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement, but also the most difficult to implement • Provide comparative gap analysis with the benchmarked best practices from the regions that have made substantial progress in MAB refurbishing (e.g., Slovakia); • Review of current housing policies, institutional structures, energy efficiency policies, reform agendas, as well as the banking sector landscape in the selected Western Balkans countries • Identify opportunities for legislative and regulatory improvements, capacity building, and financing models for developing enabling environment for energy efficiency investment by HOAs • Help focusing on the principal issues hindering energy efficiency improvement by future development assistance programming, policies and regulations • Help banking industry better understand the residential energy efficiency market size, potential and risks Residential housing energy efficiency in Western Balkans Main stakeholders, main issues Homeowners HOAs & Maintenance Co’s  Ageing building stock in urgent need of renovation  Need for capacity building for Home-owner associations (HOAs) and private building maintenance companies performing routine maintenance and capital renovation  Lack of resources for comprehensive renovation, insufficient level of fees, poor enforcement of fees  Limited institutional capacities in management, financing, energy efficiency Government Sources and Types of Financing  Ministries, agencies, municipalities  Insufficient legal-regulatory framework,, poor enforcement  Lack of national housing policy or building renovation strategy  Discrepancies between state and local government responsibilities • National housing and energy related funds • Municipal budgets, subsidies • International/bilateral donors grants • International financial institutions loans • Commercial banks/credit institutions loans • Green funds and non-governmental institutions loans and grants • “Unintended” impact of subsidies, grants and soft loans  Privatization gave households their ownership over real estate in all Western Balkan countries  Multi-apartment Building (MAB) households are responsible for O&M and repair of buildings, including energy efficiency improvements.  Mixed incomes / affordability  Decision-making is difficult Analysis Revelations – obvious and not that obvious • Virtually all energy efficiency implementations has grant component to “get the energy efficiency investment engine started” – for the last 3 decades !! • Very similar in each Western Balkan country, energy efficiency investment is hindered by several complex, interrelated issues, such as insufficient legal and regulatory environment, subsidized energy prices, low capacity for implementation, banking industry reluctance • Banks perceive lending to HOAs as extremely high risk due to multiple decision- makers/accountability, HOA legal status, low maintenance fees, irregular payments, difficult payment enforcement, lack of collateral • Rehabilitation of residential buildings in Western Balkans is Euro 4 bln market - single largest untapped market with large potential for CO2 reduction, job creation, positive impact on energy poverty, housing affordability, homelessness • Such level of investment cannot be funded by only public funds – it requires private, commercially based funding, not distorting market by grants and subsidies • Complex solution must include provisions for assisting vulnerable population 5 Recommended actions and next steps Governments Continue reform in housing, energy efficiency, banking regulations Develop clear strategies in prioritizing and financing building renovation Carefully target public/municipal finance for leveraging commercial EE lending in Building renovation (grants, guarantees, support schemes) Enroll (existing/new) public agencies in promotion and facilitation Learn from best practices: Slovakia, Romania, Poland, Croatia Hungary, Baltics Donors Streamline technical assistance for policy reform Strengthen the capacities of market players; particularly the HOAs for better creditworthiness Help design tailor made support mechanisms, support in development, implementation and monitoring of high-quality projects in building EE renovation Raise awareness of all players on the benefits of EE renovation Seek targeted use of grants for improving bankability of investments, financing building reinforcement/accessibility, subsidizing socially vulnerable households Seek pooled financing by multiple donors/IFIs Financial Institutions Provide affordable, tailor-made financing for building renovation to HOAs Partner with government in setting up guarantee facilities Require elimination of distortionary grant subsidies and aim for gradual commercialization of building EE investment finance Work with central banks/treasuries to design flexible financing products (project finance, unsecured lending, factoring) Partner with private sector (ESCOs) to manage and minimize risks 6 Andrew Popelka Senior Energy Advisor, Energy and Infrastructure Division Bureau for Europe and Eurasia U.S. Agency for International Development T 202-567-4514 | apopelka@usaid.gov https://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PA00X3QN.pdf Report can be accessed at: Thank you https://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PA00X3QN.pdf OUTCOMES OF THE GAP ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSING SECTOR IN WESTERN BALKAN COUNTRIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY Analysis objective and approach Residential housing energy efficiency in Western BalkansMain stakeholders, main issues Analysis Revelations – obvious and not that obvious Recommended actions and next steps Slide Number 6
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Score: 992845.9 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...lysis%20of%20the%20housing.pdf
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For 2014 we have decided on a rebrand to focus on the future and kickstart the discussions between all players that, it is increasingly clear, are essential to moving more swiftly towards intelligent and autonomous driving. It is why we have reshaped the event to include two high-level sessions that will engage key industry players and other stakeholders with a view to tackling some of the obstacles facing rollout of these technologies. (...) UNECE is an important player in this field and a key partner for our work as we me move forward.
Language:English
Score: 992241.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/t.../Pages/FutureNetworkedCar.aspx
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Why a paper on land banking? 2. Objectives 3. Approaches 4. Governance – institutional and legal framework 5. (...) Why a paper on land banking? 2. Objectives 3. Approaches 4. Governance – institutional and legal framework 5. (...) Why a paper on land banking? 2. Objectives 3. Approaches 4. Governance – institutional and legal framework 5.
Language:English
Score: 992022.4 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...cuments/LANDNET/2012/04_en.pdf
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YOUR LOGO Page  6 Start-Up Guide for the Technopreneur  Introduction of Conceptual Tools for Financial Planning & Strategic Decision-Making  Efficient Fund-Raising for Minimal Dilution & Loss of Decision-Making Control  Negotiating Tactics & Strategies  Introduction to Startup Governance  Devising a Financial Strategy & Plan Financial Planning, Strategy, Fund-Raising & Negotiations YOUR LOGO Page  7 Bootstrapping Strategies for Tech Startups  Re-Define the term bootstrapping as a Strategy  Three Vital Resources for Startups: Financial, Relational & Knowledge-Based  Minor & Major Bootstrapping Opportunities  Devising a Bootstrapping Strategy & Plan Acquiring Vital Resources in a Cost-Effective Manner YOUR LOGO Page  8 Building Startup Ecosystems  Introducing the Vibrancy Rating  Development Stages of a Startup Ecosystem  Narrative on the Development of the Thai Startup Community  Proper Role of each Startup Ecosystem Player  Innovative Venture Policy Proposal Vibrancy Rating: Measure the Progress of Startup Ecosystem Development YOUR LOGO Page  9 Dictums of Startup Ecosystem Stakeholder Engagement Value of Building a Vibrant Startup Community  The value of building a vibrant startup community is to allow the other stakeholders, particularly the public sector and corporate community, to leverage the innovations of Entrepreneurs via partnership or acquisition.  Beware of use of vanity metrics Primary Source of Innovation is from Entrepreneurs  There is a difference between strong technical talent and the Innovative Talent to be sought  Innovative Talent are not looking for jobs  Innovative talent must be sourced both locally and abroad YOUR LOGO Page  10 Dictums of Startup Ecosystem Stakeholder Engagement Entrepreneurs are the Rightful Risk-Takers  Accept & Appreciate that it is the Entrepreneurs who are assuming and absorbing much of the risks risks associated with innovation. (...) Availability of Vital Resources to Startups  The focus of Ecosystem Building for all Stakeholders is to ensure that all three vital resources for startups (Financial, Relational and Knowledge-Based) are available from diverse and competing sources YOUR LOGO Page  11 The Six Stakeholders in a Startup Ecosystem Entrepreneurs Investors Startup Organizations Universities Corporate community 1 2 3 4 5 Government6 Optimal Roles YOUR LOGO Page  12 Startup Players Entrepreneurs Investors Primary Role is to Develop Innovations  Assume the leadership role in building the local startup community  Have regional and global ambitions  Foster a “we are all in the same boat” spirit d’corps  Establish both online and offline forums for mutual support and develop a community consciousness  Establish an organized and unified voice for the community  Promote the startup community as a whole Primary Role of Investors is to select those Investment-Grade ventures worthy of the support of all Stakeholders  Provide sufficient investment capital for success  Make Strategic Introductions  Offer management expertise  Insist on good governance  Market-driven allocation of resources  Trailblaze paths to Exit Opportunities Optimal Roles YOUR LOGO Page  13 Startup Players Startup Organizations Universities The Primary Role of Startup Organizations is too provide “no strings attached” resources that they particularly possess that are vital to startups in an impartial manner  Provide access to global networks  Disseminate best startup practices  Organize Community-Building Events Primary Role is to produce a large local Innovative Talent Pool  Establish Advanced Technology R&D Facilites  Entrepreneurial Awareness Programs  University Incubator Programs  Monetize University Sponsored Research by partnering with local startups capable of commercializing it rather than licensing it out to an entity that often pigeon-holes the technology Optimal Roles YOUR LOGO Page  14 Startup Players Corporate Community Government Primary Role is to provide a sufficient runway for local startups to scale first domestically and then globally by allowing access to vast client base, IT infrastructure and distribution network  Startups are not your competitors they are a means to enhance your competitiveness  Devise a Corproate Startup Engagement (CSE) Strategy  Provide industry and management expertise  Ensure startup interests adequately represented in Buisness Chambers The Primary Role of Government is to get out of the way by creating a favorable regulatory and business environment for cash-starved entrepreneurs  Offer Incentives for startups in all funding stages and all supporting stakeholders (i.e. IV Proposal)  Public Funding not to compete with Private Funding  Avoid the use of vanity metrics  Quality over Quantity of Startups  Public Incubators with appropriate KPIs Optimal Roles YOUR LOGO Page  15 Stakeholder Collaborative Factors Decision-Making Processes Resources Alignment of Interests Risk Tolerance Empathy YOUR LOGO Page  16 Avenues of Engagement  Engagement with other Stakeholders and the startup ecosystem as a whole needs to be approached in the following manners: Strategic- Considering one’s strategic self-interests and Resources that can be contributed Opportunistic- Collaborative Opportunties often present themselves unexpectantly, assume many forms and on varied scales Pro-Active- Become a lead organizer, actively seek and actively participate in collaborative events and entities Entrepreneurs Startup Organizations Universities Investors Corporations Government Strategic, Opportunistic & Pro-Active YOUR LOGO Page  17 Concluding Remarks: Stakeholder Engagement The objective is for all stakeholders to leverage the innovations of local startups to enhance the global competitiveness of the entire economy Each of the Six Startup Ecosystem Players have Optimal Roles Mutual Empathy among Stakeholders is required for effective collaboration Be Strategic, Opportunisitic & Pro-Active regarding Stakeholder Engagement 1 2 3 4 5 The Focus is ensuring the availability of the three vital Resources required of Entrepreneurs- Financial, Relational and Knowledge- Based.
Language:English
Score: 991121.9 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R...0in%20Startup%20Ecosystems.pdf
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Under his leadership, STEM has become the preferred platform for in-depth analysis of network costs and profitability for global players such as Ericsson, Siemens and Cable & Wireless. (...) This up-to-the-minute insight allows him to guide further software development, enhancing the functionality and flexibility of STEM to meet the long-term objectives of the industry. His latest model initiative, to examine the costs of migrating voice and data services to a common NGN platform, follows models commissioned to address various topical issues including ADSL, MAN, 3G and WLAN.
Language:English
Score: 991111 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/tech...007/Bios/CV_Moscow_RBailey.pdf
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Abstract: Over the last decade, the Caribbean region, led by Jamaica, engaged in a process of strategic reform of its telecommunications policy, de-constructing an environment of monopoly service provision and embracing multi-player markets and mobile competition. This strategic change delivered widespread access to mobile phones, to users in all segments of the Caribbean market, where, in line with many other regions of the world, voice telephony became ubiquitous. (...) The presentation will argue that this is required to meet wider educational, commercial and development objectives in making the region more globally competitive.
Language:English
Score: 991111 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/fina...pdf/session9_Dunn_Abstract.pdf
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