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FDI, Remittances and Net ODA towards Latin America and the Caribbean (in percent of GDP) 4% 5% 6% FDI Source: on the basis of WDI, World Bank 03% 01% 00% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 19 70 19 72 19 74 19 76 19 78 19 80 19 82 19 84 19 86 19 88 19 90 19 92 19 94 19 96 19 98 20 00 20 02 20 04 20 06 20 08 20 10 20 12 6 remittances ODA Portfolio flows have at times been a relevant source of finance for the region but they have been volatile and during the nineties they were highly procyclical… 02% 02% 03% 03% 4% 6% 8% Real GDP, yoy % change, left axis Private portfolio flows, net, in % of GDP (right axis) 7 Source: on the basis of WEO, IMF -02% -01% -01% 00% 01% 01% -4% -2% 0% 2% 19 80 19 81 19 82 19 83 19 84 19 85 19 86 19 87 19 88 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 20 08 20 09 20 10 20 11 20 12 20 13 Even though a larger mobilization of private resources could be potentially beneficial, some very important issues arise from a financing for development perspective…  Public and private flows obey a different logic and respond to different incentives Private capital mostly driven by the profit motive (economic profitability) o Private sector will under-invest in certain areas relevant for development if the expected return -on a risk adjusted basis- underperforms other investment opportunities Public resources play a unique role, providing financing for sectors that do not attract private flows sufficiently (social profitability) But there is also space and mechanisms for public policies to gear private capital towards development objectives o Requires an adequate regulatory environment and incentive scheme  Public and private flows obey a different logic and respond to different incentives Private capital mostly driven by the profit motive (economic profitability) o Private sector will under-invest in certain areas relevant for development if the expected return -on a risk adjusted basis- underperforms other investment opportunities Public resources play a unique role, providing financing for sectors that do not attract private flows sufficiently (social profitability) But there is also space and mechanisms for public policies to gear private capital towards development objectives o Requires an adequate regulatory environment and incentive scheme New trends in financing sources have been accompanied by changes in the players channeling this finance… Some players have the potential to increase their relevance in the financing for development landscape Private philanthropy o At the global level it now amounts to nearly US$ 60 billion per year, equivalent to almost half the net ODA disbursed in one year by DAC donor countries South-South cooperation and non-DAC donor countries Private and public institutional investors: Pension Funds, Insurance Companies, Mutual Funds, Sovereign Wealth Funds, etc. oWith growing assets under management and the potential to provide long-term financing they can become important players in development finance Some players have the potential to increase their relevance in the financing for development landscape Private philanthropy o At the global level it now amounts to nearly US$ 60 billion per year, equivalent to almost half the net ODA disbursed in one year by DAC donor countries South-South cooperation and non-DAC donor countries Private and public institutional investors: Pension Funds, Insurance Companies, Mutual Funds, Sovereign Wealth Funds, etc. oWith growing assets under management and the potential to provide long-term financing they can become important players in development finance Consistently with these trends, mechanisms and instruments for development finance have also been changing…  New initiatives that use limited public concessional resources (grants) to leverage sizeable non-concessional resources (loans) Eg. (...) Latin American Investment Facility (LAIF), 2010 o Its primary objective is to finance key infrastructure projects in transport, energy, social and environmental sectors in LAC region o Uses limited funds (grants) contributed by the European Commission to leverage sizable loans from multilateral or bilateral public European Development Finance Institutions, Regional Latin American Development Banks and own contributions from partner countries in Latin America. o Since its inception (in 2010), grant contributions amounted to aprox. € 160 million, leveraging total new investments of about € 4.2 billion (i.e. 26 euros raised for every euro contributed by LAIF) Consistently with these trends, mechanisms and instruments for development finance have also been changing… (cont.)  New initiatives that use public resources to mobilize private investment towards development objectives  Eg. (...) In summary… • The financing for sustainable development architecture faces important future challenges Take charge of a widening set of development objectives and priorities While at the same time being articulated in a coherent and orderly way Take charge of policy issues that arise from the growing importance of private financing Take charge of the necessary balance that should be maintained between foreign and domestic resource mobilization • The financing for sustainable development architecture faces important future challenges Take charge of a widening set of development objectives and priorities While at the same time being articulated in a coherent and orderly way Take charge of policy issues that arise from the growing importance of private financing Take charge of the necessary balance that should be maintained between foreign and domestic resource mobilization
Language:English
Score: 956523 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de.../news/files/2.d.titelman-2.pdf
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Furthermore, Museums of Bologna have also created the video game WunderBO, to encourage players to explore the cultural heritage of Bologna. Throughout the game, players experience adventures full of puzzles, curiosities and hidden objects, while collecting ‘discoveries’ from the Medieval Museum and the Museum of Palazzo Poggi in Bologna to recompose a real Wunderkammer or ‘chamber of wonders’.
Language:English
Score: 946425.3 - https://en.unesco.org/creative...s/default/files/bologna_en.pdf
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The rationale for any regulatory response to new technologies should be grounded in the impact on consumers, societies, market players and investment flows as well as on national development as a whole. v. (...) Policy and regulation should focus on building trust and engagement: Collaborative regulation provides the space for co-creating win-win propositions, working towards regulatory objectives while increasing the engagement of industry. (...) These instruments can also enable market players to reflect on their performance and impact on the economy and development, and engage in self-regulation. 3.
Language:English
Score: 945788.7 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/C...19BestPracticeGuidelines_E.pdf
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Microsoft PowerPoint - Maarten Blokland UNESCO IHE 1 Capacity Building Experiences In the Water for African Cities Programme 3 December 2006 Maarten Blokland UNESCO-IHE Core Activities Focus on Human Resources & Institutional Development 2 UNESCO-IHE Staff and Outputs 2005 166 Staff (92 Academic, 74 Support) 300 Guest Faculty 4 Academic programmes in water and environment: - 193 MSc participants ) From 66 countries - 58 PhD fellows ) - 449 Participants in 45 Short Courses, incl. 83 in the 1st run of 6 on-line courses R&D: 231 Publications 121 Projects (Capacity Building, research, tailor made training, advisory services) Turnover of € 23 mln, financial result +€ 20,000 UNESCO-IHE Connecting the Community of 13,000 Alumni in 162 countries UNESCO-IHE Alumni Community 0 - 50 51-150 151-300 301-500 501-850 851-1200 3 UNESCO-IHE Networking activities in Africa NBCBN-RE WaterNet Water for African Cities Water for African Cities, Objectives The WAC programme (collaborative initiative of UNCHS - Habitat and UNEP) supports African countries to manage the urban water crisis and to protect the water resources Its objectives are: Operationalising an effective Water Demand Management (WDM) strategy in six demonstration cities for efficient water use by domestic users, industry and public institutions. (...) Quality Assurance Reporting MOA with cities Water for African Cities, the Contracts 5 Water for African Cities, Players and Activities 6 x WAC City Organisations CapBldg & Training Centres 1x International 2x Regional 6x Local Info Training Action Plan Technical Economic/Financial Legal/Institutional/Organisational PublicAwareness &Participation Capacity building Water for African Cities, the Target Groups Board, Council Managing Director and Deputies Top level Senior level Middle level Heads of Section, Branch Managers Directors, Heads of Department 3 3 15 Other Key Players Utility 6 Water for African Cities – the Action Planning Approach Middle Level Managers (15/city) Senior Level Managers (3/city) Top Level Managers (3/city) Cycle 1 Fall 2004 Cycle 2 Spring 2005 Nairobi Dakar Lusaka Abidjan Addis Ababa Accra Nairobi, Kenya Delft, the Netherlands Implementation Delft, the Netherlands Nairobi Nairobi Dakar Lusaka Addis Ababa Accra Abidjan Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso Action Plans Lessons Learned Water for African Cities, Training/Seminar Design Training Design: each group 2 trainings Objective: Mainstream and operationalise WDM and EM throughout the utility and beyond Upon completion of the training/seminar, the participant: appreciates the importance of WDM and EM… understands the approaches…………………... knows the methods………………………………. knows strategies across WAC……………………….. knows related activities and results………………… understands own position and role, expected contribution and required levels of cooperation…. understands and is able to design a Project Matrix using LFA and a Schedule using MS Project or equivalent……. prepares situational analysis of work situation;identifies and evaluates alternative WDM/EM projects; selects, details and implements most beneficial project(s)………. (...) Turnover of high level staff had a negative impact on the consistency in follow up and supervision Participants at different levels were not always in the same ‘hierarchical line’ Conclusions Level 1 (learning impact): learning objectives have been attained Level 2 (impact on individual performance): varies between managers, e.g. action plans not always realistic Level 3 (functional & organisational improvement): Clear indication of impact in some city organisations 8 Thank You!
Language:English
Score: 941335.2 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...rica/presentations/maarten.pdf
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Objectives | Peste des petits ruminants | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO.org العربية 中文 english français Русский Español Peste des petits ruminants Background Global Programme Current situation Resources News and events Objectives Stepwise approach Components Programme objectives The PPR GEP lays the foundation for eradicating PPR by first reducing its prevalence in the countries currently infected. (...) Over the five years of the programme, national VS will become key players in its successful implementation. Where appropriate, the programme will additionally support activities to reduce the prevalence of other prioritized small ruminant diseases (SRD), in particular those with the best chance of boosting the PPR GEP’s objectives.
Language:English
Score: 939736.5 - https://www.fao.org/ppr/global-programme/objectives/en/
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. • The sustainable, flexible and efficient agriculture and food security is a priority for the EU and its member states Food waste figures of Hungary 1,8 million tons food waste/year 33% of this is generated in households 68kg/capita/year food waste 33kg/capita/year food waste could be avoided by conscious shopping Food waste prevention in Hungary • Hungary builds on the voluntary approach and the social responsibility of the market players instead of strict and obligatory regulations • We build a food waste prevention model where the key focus is on voluntarism, and the co-operation of the governmental, non-governmental and market players • Instead of regulation it is more important to maintain the motivation of the market players with positive incentives and to enhance the co-ordination activities • Regarding the regulation it is important to eliminate the legal barriers and to map the regulatory possibilities for food waste prevention Examples that works • Simplification of the regulation of the food donation where the retail traders and producers can offer food for charity purposes. (...) Lang=en Solution oriented approach „Without Residue” project of the National Food Chain Safety Office launched in 2016 , supported by the EU LIFE programme. http://maradeknelkul.hu The objective is to define the problems and fine solutions for food loss prevention and disseminate good practices.
Language:English
Score: 937190.2 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa..._6_Ms._Terz_Krisztina_Szab.pdf
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Exercise planning 5.1 A Planning Meeting is held at least 3 months prior to an exercise, allowing participating agencies to negotiate the exercise objectives, determine the impact area, and, if necessary, design the volcanic and meteorological activity messages to serve the objectives. (...) VAAC, MET, ATM, AIS, AO, etc); b) Negotiate the specific objectives of each exercise (during Planning Meeting); c) Assists in the design of the exercise scenario which serves the objectives; d) Prepares the content of messages which are the result of the exercise scenario; e) Provides input to the Exercise Directive; f) Initiates and oversees the exercise operation; g) Submits Initial Exercise Report to Exercise Leader; and h) Provides input during the Debrief Meeting. 2) The Directing Staff have the following post exercise duties: a) Present the exercise lessons learnt and follow-up recommendations within their own particular specialist area; and b) Advises and instructs exercise participants (players) and new Directing Staff members, and facilitates appropriate renewal of Directing Staff. (...) VAAC, MET Watch Office, ACC, AO, etc). 3. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The negotiated objectives of the exercise. 4.
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Score: 937099.8 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...2013/atm-met-tf1/WP04_AppB.pdf
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The local and external players: roles and interaction > III. Challenges and outcome > IV. (...) The local and external players: roles and interaction  One of the more interesting features of the decision-making process leading to the establishment of the G20 was that it involved intensive interaction between public and private domestic actors and between these actors and external players. (...) The G20 tries to strike a balance between the interests of trade liberalization and the development objectives of its members. Cairns is more focused on trade liberalization.
Language:English
Score: 936474.9 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...sp_e/casestudies_e/case7_e.htm
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Summary of « Women as Economic Players in Sustainable Development », sponsored by GWIT with the support of CIDA and the Summary of Session on “Women as Economic Players in Sustainable Development” Organized by Geneva Women in International Trade (GWIT) With the support of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and the Women Ambassadors in Geneva This well-attended, groundbreaking event – the first-ever session on gender and trade at a WTO Symposium – was intended to draw the attention of the WTO and the multilateral trading system to the significant contributions that women make in international trade and to highlight the impact of trade liberalisation on women. (...) GWIT President Cherise Valles then noted that the specific objective for this session was to put these issues on the table and to lay a clear marker for further discussion of this issue at the multilateral trade level.
Language:English
Score: 934420.7 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...e/symp03_gwit_background_e.doc
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In order to support this objective, the Working Party also recommended to establish a team experts to consider the “list of issues of concern and suggestions” brought forward during the Forum (see annex ) and other relevant market surveillance issues. 8. (...) Market surveillance is important for the protection of human health, safety and other legitimate objectives. Since different approaches to the concept and its implementation are pursued within the UNECE region, communication is seen as indispensable between all players, including public authorities, economic operators and consumers/users; 2. (...) Efforts should be made to ensure consumers or users confidence regarding the safety of products and other legitimate objectives specified in legislation; 5. Efforts should be made to explore ways to raise awareness and give greater visibility to market surveillance activities among all relevant players, including manufacturers (and in particular, SMEs), suppliers and consumers.
Language:English
Score: 933976.5 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trade/ctied7/trd-03-007e.doc
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