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Joint ITU-T/ OASIS Workshop and Demonstration of Advances in ICT Standards for Public Warning Français  |  Español   Print Version   Home : ITU-T Home : Workshops and Seminars   Joint ITU-T/ OASIS Workshop and Demonstration of Advances in ICT Standards for Public Warning   Geneva, 19-20 October 2006   Contact: tsbworkshops@itu.int Introduction ITU-T is hosted a Workshop and Demonstration of Advances in ICT Standards for Public Warning in collaboration with the OASIS (Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards) at the ITU headquarters in Geneva, 19-20 October 2006. Objectives The specific objectives for the Workshop and Demonstration were: To review progress concerning public warning since 2003, including the Tampere Convention To demonstrate the availability and effectiveness of interoperable technologies based on the OASIS Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) content standard which is applicable to all alerts and notifications in disasters and emergency situations To identify existing standardization gaps, including authorization and authentication of public warnings and the attendant implications for public policy To prepare an action list for filling gaps and promoting public warning standardization, and identify key players that could collaborate in such work.  
Language:English
Score: 912998.8 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/worksem/ictspw/index.html
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The local and external players and their roles > III. Challenges faced and the outcome > IV. (...) Nevertheless, despite hardships and obscurities, many of the objectives sought through Decree No. 6 were achieved. (...) In this interplay, ideally, the first objective move to enter or to act within the WTO parameters should be coming from the grass-roots players, that is the domestic industries.
Language:English
Score: 912895.3 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...p_e/casestudies_e/case29_e.htm
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Presentation title (Arial 44 pt, bold middle-aligned) 9 November 2021 COVAX Pillar Strategy for 2022 and beyond DRAFT CONTENT PENDING FURTHER CONSULTATION 2 In the last 15 months, COVAX has made significant progress and is a primary player in the global vaccine response As of November 8 COVAX has shipped 463 million vaccines Tackled need to harmonize and revamp procurement terms (model I&L) and established the COVAX No Fault Compensation scheme for AMC. Introduced first EULs for vaccines and the COVAX Humanitarian Buffer COVAX made it possible for the first vaccine deliveries in lower and lower- middle income countries to take place within 38 days from introduction in the first few high-income countries (HICs) Ensured the sufficient ramp-up of manufacturing capacity, establishing the COVAX Marketplace for critical input supplies, and planning for regional manufacturing hubs 463m doses Innovative mechanisms 38 days Manufacturing Taskforce COVAX assessed and supported the roll-out planning process in >100 countries with the development of National Deployment and Vaccination Plans R&D support enabled access to a portfolio of 13 vaccines/candidates across 4+ technology platforms 13 vaccines >100 countries So far, COVAX has been able to raise >$12.3B for across the value chain to date The fair and equitable allocation mechanism was established across partners, ready in time to allocate doses globally, with shipments now to 144 participants 12.3Bn Global allocation DRAFT | CONTENT PENDING FURTHER CONSULTATION As of 8 November 2021 3 Major shifts have happened since the creation of COVAX Current situation (November 2021)Mid-2020 expectations Significant ramp up in global supply (>5Bn to date), thanks to established players as well as emerging manufacturers (India, China, Russia). (...) AU/AVAT) Access not equitable; bilateral deals spread across income groups; conc- entrated in HICs/UMICs; supply to HICs/UMICs prioritised by manufacturers Aspiration for large centralised pooled procurement to effectively compete for early doses making bilateral deals largely about scaling up beyond initial access Supply, procurement and access Rapid development, high success rates for multiple platforms; several vaccines from established players, biotechs and emerging manufacturers; emerging safety questions Continued data gaps including e.g. need for boosters, safety in sub-groups, duration of protection, pediatric use, & interchangeability (mix & match) Unknown / under-estimated probability of success for vaccines’ efficacy Ambitious planning for EUL in 2020 despite traditionally long development timelines Science and R&D Disease progression uneven, possibly due to demographics and non- pharmaceutical interventions; impact of variants on epidemiology and vaccines and other countermeasures is uncertain Initial simplifying assumption to not fully reflect global variability and anticipated viral evolution Pandemic / viral evolution In-country delivery an urgent topic for many AMCs – heterogeneous situation across countries with varying types of challenges and levels of absorption and key challenges including limited predictability of supply, in- country inequities, lack of management capacity, large healthcare workforce needs, gaps in cold chain and service delivery or vaccine confidence issues Urgency around securing supply with less emphasis on building the capacity to deliver it In-country delivery DRAFT | CONTENT PENDING FURTHER CONSULTATION 4 COVAX Pillar strategic priorities – ambition levels Actively managed portfolio of effective, affordable & scalable vaccines Advancing equitable access & fair allocation Increased support and innovative solutions to in- country delivery for AMC92 Robust foundation for countries’ vaccination coverage ambitions DRAFT | CONTENT PENDING FURTHER CONSULTATION Support countries' individual goals and situations in light of the global vaccination target of 70% 5 COVAX calls upon the world and its partners to help deliver on its goals and strategic priorities for 2022 and beyond a Support its contribution objective through funds, dose donations, or other forms of partnership Ask manufacturers and governments to prioritise the delivery of COVAX doses, on or ahead of agreed timelines, facilitate tech transfers and the development of a geographically diversified supply chain, and the global provisioning of primary course doses before boosters b Increase data and information sharing, improving transparency on the access to and uptake of COVID-19 vaccines globally, looking across all sources of supply d Ensure all possible efforts are made to prepare, fund, and execute the major delivery programs required to absorb this volume e Foster highly active collaboration between all mechanisms focused on equity in support of those participants with the highest needs. f c Ensuring critical existing and emerging R&D questions and evidence gaps are tackled equitably and systematically to support outcomes and policy development in the AMC92 DRAFT | CONTENT PENDING FURTHER CONSULTATION
Language:English
Score: 911432.6 - https://www.unicef.org/supply/...tegy-update-Lada-Georgieva.pdf
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WORLD WATER DAY March 22nd, 2021 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM GMT+2 Programme Background The United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/47/193 of 22 December 1992 by which 22 March of each year was declared World Day for Water, to be observed starting in 1993, in conformity with the recommendations of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) contained in Chapter 18 (Fresh Water Resources) of Agenda 21.The World Water Day is held annually on 22 March as a means of focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. The objectives of the World Water Day are: • To celebrate water and raising awareness of the 2.2 billion people living without access to safe water. • To encourage member states to take action to tackle the global water crisis and achieving Sustainable Development Goal 6: water and sanitation for all by 2030. • To provide an opportunity to the key players and stakeholders in the water and sanitation sector to learn more about water related issues, to be inspired to tell others and take action to make a difference. (...) In celebrating the World Water Day, UNESCO Regional Office for Southern Africa in collaboration with Waternet Trust, will hold a regional online roundtable discussion with a variety of players in the field in order to gather opinions and comments about water and what it means to them.
Language:English
Score: 911353.9 - https://en.unesco.org/sites/de.../world_water_day_e_flyer_2.pdf
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REGIONAL INTEGRATION IN LATIN AMERICA AND DYNAMIC GAINS FROM MACROECONOMIC COOPERATION
How do players choose their strategies in that type of games? (...) This is called the maximin principle, or security level that a player can guarantee independently of what other players do. (...) A Nash equilibrium is produced when no single player can obtain higher utility by changing its own part (strategy) if other players stick to their parts.
Language:English
Score: 910951.3 - HTTP://DACCESS-ODS.UN.ORG/ACCE...GET?OPEN&DS=LC/L.1933-P&LANG=E
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“ San Diego, 9-11 May 2006 11 ITU-T IPTV Players: Content Provider Consumer Joint ITU-T Workshop and IMTC Forum 2006 “H.323, SIP: is H.325 next? (...) “ San Diego, 9-11 May 2006 13 ITU-T IPTV Players: Service Provider Consumer Joint ITU-T Workshop and IMTC Forum 2006 “H.323, SIP: is H.325 next? (...) “ San Diego, 9-11 May 2006 24 ITU-T IPTV Players: Consumer Consumer Joint ITU-T Workshop and IMTC Forum 2006 “H.323, SIP: is H.325 next?
Language:English
Score: 910055.7 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...5/presentations/s4p3-levin.pdf
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It depends only on the market players (broadcaster and multiplex service provider). The players define the capacity which belongs to one SD or HD channel. (...) Market players (cable, IPTV and DTH operators) are active and they promote their service while they educated the viewers.
Language:English
Score: 910055.7 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/tech...sition/Hungary/Hungary_Web.pdf
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Open Pluggable Specification :– An integrated modular DS media player solution that interconnects with the display panel via a standard mating internal connector interfaceinternal connector interface Functional Block Diagram Docking Board Power Supply Unit TMDS DisplayPort Pluggable module 8 0 p in JA E T X 2 5 Board Panel Control Board USB for Touch-screen, Camera, RFID device etc HDMI/DVI Audio UART Panel 8 0 p in JA E T X 2 4 Legend: Display panel components DP Sink Audio 3*USB 2.0 Power DisplayPort UART Control Signals DC+12~+19V Legend: Display panel components Pluggable Module Prototype Compact dimension (mm): 180 119 30 1st Fan-less solution for up to Intel® Core™ i7 LV Processor (25W) 200 119 X Intel® Active Management Technology (AMT6.0) enabled for OOB remote manageability Interconnect Features 1.JAE TX25 Plug & TX24 Receptacle Connectors Blind-mate type - higher tolerance on mating misalignment 80 pin circuits – 40 top and 40 bottom contacts 500 Insertion Lifecycle 2. Supported Interfaces Power HDMI/DVI and DisplayPort AudioAudio USB2.0/3.0 UART OPS Control Signals OPS Technologies Value Added Made Easy Lower Total Cost of Ownership Increased Return of Investment O P E X I M P A C T Installation & Usage •Higher Implementation Cost Upgradability O P S S O L U T IO N Simplify Installation • Less cabling • Space saving • Consolidated H/W, Image Sensor, NFC, Touch etc Seamless Upgradability Improved OPEX with OPS O P E X I M P A C T •Difficult to Upgrade Reliability •Connection & Wiring Reliability Serviceability •Hard to Access & O P S S O L U T IO N Seamless Upgradability • Modularity and Scalability • Interchangeable Improved Reliability • Less cabling with JAE Connector • Reduced liability - Less tangible components e.g Power Supply Improved Serviceability Open Pluggable Specification (OPS)9 •Hard to Access & Maintenance O P S S O L U T IO N Improved Serviceability • Active management capability • Easy swap OPS modules • HW KVM for POP and HDMI CEC for POD Agenda • Digital Signage Open Pluggable Specification (OPS) Introduction • Digital Signage Open Pluggable Specification (OPS) Update OPS Business Model • EBM designs, manufactures & ships pluggable modules based on Open Pluggable Specification • Industry Alliance EBMs/OEMs/Standard Bodies Embedded Open Pluggable Specification •SI/Network Operators EBMs/OEMs/Standard Bodies Embedded Board Manufacturer (EBM) • Co-develop • Provide samples for test and Validation De-facto Standard • Buys pluggable module from Intel’s enabled EBMs • Integrates module into OEM displays Display OEM DS DISPLAY OEM: • Faster TTM on new DS player adoption/migration • Better product scalability and offering • Easier & faster distribution for the market OPS Standardization Benefits EBM & IA ODM: • Increase high volume business opportunities • Driving standard reference design for pluggable module – high volume lower costs ECOSYSTEM & DS ADOPTERS:ECOSYSTEM & DS ADOPTERS: • Increased reliability between DS Player & display • Space saving + easier deployment • Modularity and scalability • Improved maintenance process OPS Plug Fest Update • Objective: • Ensure OPS modules produced by ODMs/OEMs can work seamlessly with OPS displays for OPS broad market engagementengagement • Date: Jan 9th -10th, 2012 (two-day event) • Time: 9:30AM – 16:30PM • Venue: Regent Hotel, Taipei • Participants as of Dec. 1, 2011 • 6 OPS module manufactures • 8 OPS display manufactures http://edc.intel.com/Applications/Digital-Signage/OPS/ To download the spec and for more information on OPS go to: Questions on OPS? (...) Reliability • Connection & Wiring Reliability Extra cabling Space consuming Compromised Reliability Extra Logistics Fragmented DVD Player PC Challenges 4. Serviceability • Hard to Access & Maintenance Media Player Save Operating Expenditure (OPEX) with Digital Signage Open Pluggable Specification (OPS)
Language:English
Score: 907235.9 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../06/5B/T065B00000B0063PDFE.pdf
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Microsoft PowerPoint - Maarten Blokland UNESCO IHE 1 Capacity Building Experiences In the Water for African Cities Programme 3 December 2006 Maarten Blokland UNESCO-IHE Core Activities Focus on Human Resources & Institutional Development 2 UNESCO-IHE Staff and Outputs 2005 166 Staff (92 Academic, 74 Support) 300 Guest Faculty 4 Academic programmes in water and environment: - 193 MSc participants ) From 66 countries - 58 PhD fellows ) - 449 Participants in 45 Short Courses, incl. 83 in the 1st run of 6 on-line courses R&D: 231 Publications 121 Projects (Capacity Building, research, tailor made training, advisory services) Turnover of € 23 mln, financial result +€ 20,000 UNESCO-IHE Connecting the Community of 13,000 Alumni in 162 countries UNESCO-IHE Alumni Community 0 - 50 51-150 151-300 301-500 501-850 851-1200 3 UNESCO-IHE Networking activities in Africa NBCBN-RE WaterNet Water for African Cities Water for African Cities, Objectives The WAC programme (collaborative initiative of UNCHS - Habitat and UNEP) supports African countries to manage the urban water crisis and to protect the water resources Its objectives are: Operationalising an effective Water Demand Management (WDM) strategy in six demonstration cities for efficient water use by domestic users, industry and public institutions. (...) Quality Assurance Reporting MOA with cities Water for African Cities, the Contracts 5 Water for African Cities, Players and Activities 6 x WAC City Organisations CapBldg & Training Centres 1x International 2x Regional 6x Local Info Training Action Plan Technical Economic/Financial Legal/Institutional/Organisational PublicAwareness &Participation Capacity building Water for African Cities, the Target Groups Board, Council Managing Director and Deputies Top level Senior level Middle level Heads of Section, Branch Managers Directors, Heads of Department 3 3 15 Other Key Players Utility 6 Water for African Cities – the Action Planning Approach Middle Level Managers (15/city) Senior Level Managers (3/city) Top Level Managers (3/city) Cycle 1 Fall 2004 Cycle 2 Spring 2005 Nairobi Dakar Lusaka Abidjan Addis Ababa Accra Nairobi, Kenya Delft, the Netherlands Implementation Delft, the Netherlands Nairobi Nairobi Dakar Lusaka Addis Ababa Accra Abidjan Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso Action Plans Lessons Learned Water for African Cities, Training/Seminar Design Training Design: each group 2 trainings Objective: Mainstream and operationalise WDM and EM throughout the utility and beyond Upon completion of the training/seminar, the participant: appreciates the importance of WDM and EM… understands the approaches…………………... knows the methods………………………………. knows strategies across WAC……………………….. knows related activities and results………………… understands own position and role, expected contribution and required levels of cooperation…. understands and is able to design a Project Matrix using LFA and a Schedule using MS Project or equivalent……. prepares situational analysis of work situation;identifies and evaluates alternative WDM/EM projects; selects, details and implements most beneficial project(s)………. (...) Turnover of high level staff had a negative impact on the consistency in follow up and supervision Participants at different levels were not always in the same ‘hierarchical line’ Conclusions Level 1 (learning impact): learning objectives have been attained Level 2 (impact on individual performance): varies between managers, e.g. action plans not always realistic Level 3 (functional & organisational improvement): Clear indication of impact in some city organisations 8 Thank You!
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Score: 907173.6 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...iles/documents/1455maarten.pdf
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WHO | 11-15 November 2007 [an error occurred while processing this directive] Home Who we are What we do Countries Resources Events Media centre Partnership information   Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health > The Partnership work in countries printable version 11-15 November 2007: Previous page | 1 , 2 ,3, 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 , 12 Objectives and results   Contents Health Care Professionals meet in Malawi Background Objectives and results Meeting activities Advocacy "One MNCH Plan" development Addressing the human resources crisis Quality improvement Organizational strengthening Country groups work Closing session List of presentations Overall objective The overall objective of this workshop is to increase the contribution of HCP Associations to national MNCH plans through a strengthened participation in policy and programme development and an increased alignment of activities to the national targets regarding the achievement of MDGs 4 and 5 (reducing child mortality by 2/3 and maternal mortality by ¾ by 2015). Specific objectives Strengthen the role of HCP associations as advocates for MNCH and in policy dialogue ( being an effective player in dealing with legislative barriers, improving drug use policies, advocating for MNCH funding ) Explore HCP associations role in promoting one country MNCH plan ( working together and as good partners with the public sector to make this effective ) Develop the role of HCP associations in quality improvement ( training, continuing education, monitoring / supervision, standards of care, regulation and accreditation issues ) Increase HCPA joint activities to address the human resources crisis with respect to MNCH ( staff deployment and retention,, new cadre development, delegation ) Strengthen organizational aspects of HCP associations to enable them to develop more fully their roles in the areas mentioned in objectives 1 – 4, and establish better partnering between associations and with the public sector ( leadership, defining vision-plans-responsibilities, understanding how to work with the public sector, working with other associations , harnessing energies of members ).
Language:English
Score: 900955.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/coun...ries/hcp_malawi/en/index2.html
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