Home

Results 1 - 10 of 307,125 for poor credit. Search took 2.894 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
Efficiency vs equity in lending to the poor IFAD’s thematic study on rural finance in China Demand for credit is high in rural China, even at higher interest rates. Many resource-poor households are constrained not by limited capacity to borrow but by insufficient supply and availability of credit. (...) RCCs need to be able to design products that meet the requirements of resource-poor households whilst generating enough income to cover the higher costs involved in supplying credit to rural areas.
Language:English
Score: 1220614.8 - https://www.ifad.org/documents...9a-7da2-43a4-a499-e11bbc08600c
Data Source: un
Data gathered by Safaricom regarding the customer’s use of airtime, airtime credit, e-Money, and other variables is then analysed using a credit-scoring algorithm, after which CBA decides whether to grant a loan and sets the limit for approved applications. In 62 response to rapid uptake of DFS-enabled credit and savings in Kenya, this model is being replicated in other countries, such as Tanzania and Uganda. (...) Historically, most for-profit formal financial SPs have avoided poor and unbanked customers because they have not been profitable to serve.
Language:English
Score: 1211128.7 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...y/files/basic-html/page22.html
Data Source: un
The evaluation highlighted the need for a strategic change, from considering credit as input-supply towards a comprehensive approach at the three levels of the financial system (macro, meso and micro), to achieve a sustainable provision of financial services for the rural poor. (...) Accessing savings opportunities, according to the study, appears to have small but much more consistently positive effects for poor people, and bears fewer downside risks for clients than credit does. (...) In 2014 and during the two years after completion, 2015-2016, Lesotho Post Bank substantially increased its savings and credit outreach to rural and urban areas. Lesotho case study (rural financial intermediation) Source: ESR case study based on Project Performance Evaluation Lesotho (2017). 24 INCLUSIVE FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR THE RURAL POOR Stand-alone rural finance projects: advantages and disadvantages Source: IFS Evaluation Synthesis.
Language:English
Score: 1190770.3 - https://www.ifad.org/documents...97-10ab-b5cf-460b-43494d994d23
Data Source: un
Informal lenders provide the bulk of the loans to rural households in many countries. Their dominance as credit source is even greater among poor rural households. (...) In Rwanda, CARE is helping mobilize the rural poor into village savings and credit associations and linking them to the existing network of credit unions in the country. 23 Weather-index- based insurance for agriculture Weather-indexed risk management prod- ucts represent an innovative alternative to the traditional crop insurance programmes for smallholder farmers in developing coun- tries. (...) Ndoshoboye (2007), “Extending the outreach of Rwandan Peoples’ Banks to the rural poor through village savings and credit associations”, case study prepared for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO); and M.
Language:English
Score: 1188058.6 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...rends2008/ruraldevelopment.pdf
Data Source: un
Customers can also use DFS-enabled credit services to borrow for consumption or business purposes. 28 To promote DFS uptake by poor and unbanked consumers, the following elements need to be properly addressed: • Design and value proposition: As noted earlier, poor and unbanked consumers seek services that help them to address their needs, including consumption smoothing, saving small lump sums, addressing income shocks, and borrowing for consumption or business purposes. • Convenience: Services should be accessible locally (and remotely, if possible). (...) Education and literacy Most poor and unbanked consumers have low levels of formal education. (...) Gender-related disparities Poor women face particular challenges accessing DFS.
Language:English
Score: 1176605.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...y/files/basic-html/page16.html
Data Source: un
Rural women in Senegal sell processed mangos and yams: With just a little credit, poor producers can expand their businesses and incomes. (...) Such interest has not only made larger loans available, but also has made more credit and financial services available to the poor, especially women (see page 10). (...) Until now, no investor has lost a penny of principal.” Too poor for loans Not all people are ready for credit, Ms.
Language:English
Score: 1174348.6 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...mall-loans-widen-horizons-poor
Data Source: un
In Bangladesh, for instance, a study (cited in IFAD, 2001b) noted that only “26% of the hard-core poor households and 45% of the absolute-poor households belonged to a credit NGO. (...) Some NGOs (in India and Bangladesh), for instance, have helped poor women’s groups purchase or lease in land using government subsidized credit (see also, Agarwal, 1998). (...) While the notion of self-help is important in any transformative strategy, linking it to credit narrows its reach, since it often does not include the very poor; and it narrows its scope and potential.
Language:English
Score: 1173401.7 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...ower/documents/Agarwal-EP2.pdf
Data Source: un
But are they reinventing the wheel? Informal credit facilities have always existed. According to a 1998 report by the International Food Policy Research Institute, Rural finance and poverty alleviation , about 72 percent of the poor in Nepal engage in financial transactions. Borrowing during bad times or the planting season, and saving or repaying loans in good times or after the harvest, are integral to poor people's lives, said the report. Credit sources include friends and family, village moneylenders and suppliers of seeds or fertilizer who make loans 'in kind' in return for part of the harvest. (...) Also, in agricultural communities a disaster like a flood or drought usually hits lenders as well as borrowers, making credit scarce just when it is needed most. The poor will always need informal credit arrangements.
Language:English
Score: 1167772.9 - https://www.fao.org/worldfoods...lish/newsroom/focus/focus5.htm
Data Source: un
Finally, there was some discussion of micro credit as an instrument to alleviate poverty. An intervention in this respect emphasized that micro credit should not be regarded as an instrument for all poor people, but only for those of the poor who have the capacity and willingness to repay their loans. For the rest of the poor, other instruments should be used to alleviate their situation, but not micro credit. (...) While 70 per cent of Latin America’s poor live in rural areas, rural micro entrepreneurs normally lack access to formal credit.
Language:English
Score: 1167675.4 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...c2005-Summary-Santiago-Eng.pdf
Data Source: un
What are expected benefits to the rural poor? What are the expected benefits to the rural poor? (...) Design credit based products rather than grant products –long term sustainability to be ensured. Diversification of credit based products. Community based Risk Mitigation Enhance Seed Capital infusion to SHG’smicro enterprises.
Language:English
Score: 1163470.3 - https://www.ifad.org/documents...f6-b0e2-4f52-b291-7baee3071bb5
Data Source: un